News / Asia

S. Korean Judge: Samsung Didn't Copy Apple

Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III, right, and Apple's iPhone 4S are displayed at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea, August 24, 2012.Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III, right, and Apple's iPhone 4S are displayed at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea, August 24, 2012.
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Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III, right, and Apple's iPhone 4S are displayed at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea, August 24, 2012.
Samsung Electronics' Galaxy S III, right, and Apple's iPhone 4S are displayed at a mobile phone shop in Seoul, South Korea, August 24, 2012.
VOA News
A South Korean court has ruled that U.S. technology giant Apple and its South Korean rival Samsung Electronics have infringed each other's patents for mobile devices.

The Seoul court said Friday that Apple infringed on two Samsung wireless patents, while Samsung violated one of Apple's design patents. It awarded small damages to each side and imposed a limited ban on the sale of each company's products in South Korea.

Notably, the court said that Samsung, now the world's largest mobile phone maker, did not copy the design of Apple's popular iPhone.

The case is part of a multibillion dollar global legal battle between the two technology powerhouses, and sets the stage for a major verdict expected to soon be delivered in a U.S. court.

Billions of dollars are at stake in the dispute that will be decided by a jury in California, not far from Apple's headquarters. The two sides wrapped up closing arguments in the case earlier this week.

As in the South Korean case, Apple claims that Samsung copied designs of its popular iPhone and iPad devices and used them to create its own line of Galaxy devices. Apple is demanding $2.5 billion in damages for what it claims are patent infringements.

Samsung contends it has proof that by 2006 - months before Apple introduced its first iPhone in early 2007 - it was developing a next generation of smartphones with a rounded rectangular body that both companies now use.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

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by: andrewborovskikh@gmail.co
August 29, 2012 12:29 PM
Who stole whose design? They both stole from Kazimir Malevich. Black Square without frills… Neat but not gaudy. What is it all about? What is the charm and charisma of this ‘masterpiece’, God bless the mark? It is no other than Malevich's prescience about the oncoming design of the 'screen devices' (smartphones, TV sets, etc.) or what would you call them :). Here you are. A new business project: a smartphone product line BlackSquare. High time you quitted the black rectangles. Square is better than rectangle. Don’t refuse a gift.
I remember myself buying my first cell phone. I liked the metallic casing of it. I liked the shape of the buttons and the joystick, the elegant centerpiece among them. I liked the grill on the speaker. All together it subconsciously reminded me of an old-fashioned TV set. Good bye, thing. Viva, the featureless black plane! Apple, Samsung, you guys kiss and make up…

by: Anonymous
August 26, 2012 2:05 AM
Before all of this I really didn't want to get an Iphone or anything else Apple because of their proprietary ways. Now after this court ruling I will MOST DEFINATELY NOT buy an Apple product again. In fact I will be bugging all of my friends to change over to Android in the future and never go with Apple again. You want to be proprietary Apple? Then be proprietary by yourself, the world spins without you.

by: msbpodcast from: Jersey City, NJ, USA
August 24, 2012 10:09 AM
Closing the barn door after the horse has been flogged to death.

The jury is already sequestered.
In Response

by: Sophie from: WI
August 25, 2012 9:41 PM
Funny! So, does this mean my Galaxy SIII that swims along here in Atlanta on good ole AT&T's 4G LTE will have to be put to death?

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