News / Africa

Violence, Floods Impact Millions in S. Sudan: UN Official

  • UN Assistant Secretary General Kyung-Wha Kang (L.) is welcomed to Bor, capital of Jonglei state in South Sudan, by Gabriel Deng Ajak, the Relief and Rehabilitation Commission Director for the state.
  • Kang meets with women in Pibor County, where tens of thousands of people have been displaced by violence. 
  • A woman in Twic East County tells the story of how her family was impacted by cattle raids as Kang (R.) listens.
  • The UN Mission in South Sudan helped to medevac hundreds of wounded to Bor, the capital of Jonglei state, after inter-ethnic clashes in July. Kang said local leaders and the South Sudanese army must take the lead to end the violence in the new nation.

Top UN Official Visits South Sudan

Andrew Green
— A top United Nations official on Wednesday said millions of South Sudanese are in need of humanitarian assistance as natural disasters and violence rake the world's newest nation.

"Though the overall humanitarian situation has improved in several areas of South Sudan in the past year, millions of people are still in dire need of help," Assistant Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs Kyung-Wha Kang said in a statement released in Juba at the end of a four-day visit to South Sudan.

"In Jonglei State’s Pibor County, violence has displaced tens of thousands of people, who need protection, basic services, and access to safety and security so that they can resume their livelihoods," Kang said in the statement.

Tens of thousands more across South Sudan have been displaced by flooding caused by months of heavy rain. The U.N. said in a report released early this month that a quarter of the more than 223,000 South Sudanese affected by the floods were in Jonglei.

Humanitarian agencies and the South Sudanese authorities have launched an appeal for $1.1 billion to meet the needs of 3.1 million South Sudanese in 2014, Kang said.

On Tuesday, when Kang visited Jonglei state, a local leader asked her to press the U.N. to establish a base there to protect residents.

Twic East Commissioner Dau Akoi Jurkuch said seven cattle raids have claimed nearly 100 lives and displaced thousands in the county this year alone.

"Where is the UN in this situation? We have been suffering and the UN is not intervening,” Akoi said as he made his plea.

But Kang said the U.N. Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), which has 7,000 peacekeepers in the country, does not have the manpower to intervene in every attack in South Sudan. Instead, she said, the South Sudanese army, backed by local leaders, needs to take the lead in stopping attacks.

A first step toward ending the violence would be to work to end the distrust between different communities and ethnic groups, which Kang said "fuels violence and the rebel movement."

Unless a "cycle of trust" is built, she said, "I think we will see very little in terms of the outcome of assistance."

Kang also traveled to the state capital of Jonglei, Bor, and to Pibor, the heart of a rebellion led by David Yau Yau.

South Sudan's Humanitarian Affairs Undersecretary, Clement Taban Dominic, who traveled with Kang to Jonglei, said unrest in the state and elsewhere in South Sudan has prevented the government from delivering much-needed services to the people.

That would change if the violence stopped, he said.

"If we have peace, we will get all the services that we need -- the health services, the education services and anything that we need to develop our people in this great country,"  said Taban.

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Comments
     
by: Paulo miathiang from: northern America
November 21, 2013 10:24 PM
it's true what kang said all make real senses. indeed we have to have a plant in order to have a better country which we all fought for. as a matter off there is no trust; we all need to build amongst ourselves a trust, love and a way forwards the development of ours young nation otherwise the rest of the rest in our country will remain poorer and poorer, in which the nation may never settle to its feet if the issues of the imbalance is not brought to its trust. so failing to do so may branches into many different routes. 1. unknowingly. we are around the triangle tribalism war where by its can not be avoid. Having said that, we do have no politician who really know what political mean and the befits of it to her/his citizen. therefore; we only have tribalistic leaders and the hatred politician who carried two people arguemeets to the public.
2. second; we are in big big problem at the moment; because, if we do not think twice about the futuristic of our youngest nation in a way jobs need to be created to keep all youth busy. for that reason castle raiding will stop and robbing will also diminish.
3. taking accountability of our country will need all of us to honour one another wherever tribalis can be avoid. however, to keep our country or youth away from creating Somalia acts we really have to keep contemplating how to keep everybody busy in order to build the futurity our own.
indeed, I believed that coming together to do one thing and leave our self interests can help us only. one hand can not clapping itself and make sound but two hand can make sound.

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