News / Africa

South Sudan: 'Don't Get Your Hopes Up,' Analyst Says

South Sudan President Salva Kiir (L) and opposition leader Riek Machar exchange an agreement signed on May 9 in Addis Ababa, recommitting to a ceasefire deal signed in January but repeatedly violated.South Sudan President Salva Kiir (L) and opposition leader Riek Machar exchange an agreement signed on May 9 in Addis Ababa, recommitting to a ceasefire deal signed in January but repeatedly violated.
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South Sudan President Salva Kiir (L) and opposition leader Riek Machar exchange an agreement signed on May 9 in Addis Ababa, recommitting to a ceasefire deal signed in January but repeatedly violated.
South Sudan President Salva Kiir (L) and opposition leader Riek Machar exchange an agreement signed on May 9 in Addis Ababa, recommitting to a ceasefire deal signed in January but repeatedly violated.
Philip Aleu

South Sudanese should not get their hopes up that President Salva Kiir and Riek Machar will hold to this month's pledge to set up a transitional government within 60 days, an analyst at a respected Juba think tank said Thursday.

"I don't think that there is that commitment that would deliver for the 60-day period that was given," Sudd Institute researcher Augustino Ting Mayai told South Sudan in Focus," and until we see that, I don't think South Sudanese should be hopeful." 

Mr. Kiir and opposition leader Riek Machar agreed on June 10 in Addis Ababa to a 60-day time frame for setting up a transitional government, and to allow relier workers unimpeded access to people in need.

Ting said the June 10 pledge "is rhetoric, another understanding that could basically fall through."

The Sudd Institute analyst was speaking days after the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) adjourned peace talks for South Sudan. Opposition representatives failed to show up for the latest round, complaining that the negotiations were not representative of victims of the conflict, such as the 1.5 million displaced.

Even prior to the adjournment, commitments IGAD has received from the combatants have had little impact. Fighting has raged on and the numbers of the displaced have increased, regardless of a ceasefire deal signed in January and repeated pledges made since that date.

The lack of progress at the talks, and their unexpected adjournment, have led some South Sudanese to call for IGAD to be replaced by another mediating team. Ting did not agree with that perspective.

"I think IGAD still has the leverage, given that it is still backed by the international community," he said. "It can make its case through the U.N. to bring the two parties together, to negotiate and agree to whatever mechanisms have been laid out."

But, he conceded, IGAD may need "to work harder than perhaps it has been now, given that the two parties are not necessarily cooperating."

Ting said threatening the two sides with sanctions if they refuse to return to the negotiating table "is a good way to go," even though U.S. sanctions already levied against two South Sudanese officials have had little effect.

"The U.S. sanctions that were tabled against two military officials in South Sudan don't have any robust impact on the country or on the political leaders," Ting said.

"I would say the U.S. wasted its energy -- but it could be a sign that there's more that's coming," he said.

Philip Aleu interviews Augustino Ting Mayai of the Sudd Institute
Philip Aleu interviews Augustino Ting Mayai of the Sudd Institutei
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Comment Sorting
Comment on this forum (4)
Comments
     
by: Nyakor from: US
June 28, 2014 1:36 AM
Colossians 3:13-15
13 Put up with each other. Forgive the things you are holding against one another. Forgive, just as the Lord forgave you.

14 And over all of those good things put on love. Love holds them all together perfectly as if they were one.

15 Let the peace that Christ gives rule in your hearts. As parts of one body, you were appointed to live in peace. And be thankful.

No matter what going on in South Sudan, God will Save South Sudan.


by: Bol from: Bor
June 27, 2014 5:11 AM
V.O.A and Sudan Tribune with these so-called South Sudanese think tanks are these days becoming South Sudan's propagandists like Qatar sponsored Al Jazz-era.

The government of South Sudan should take a stance like what Egypt did to Al Jazz-era journalists. Lock these creeps up or throw them into the Nile, they are not journalists, but propagandists or agents of destabilization.

Or they may be creepy journalists who don't follow journalistic ethics and type of creepy journalist are even car crashed in the US it self these days, so why should we continue to let these criminals mess up with our people's peace all the times?

Let me tell you a short story, in 2001, while at my final high school year in Kenya. An American tourist turned up at our school and volunteered to teach for a week in our school, he was a lecturer at Duke University and some of us who wanted to study overseas enquired from him about studying in the US and the best colleges?

The straight talking American told us matter-of-factly to consider going to Canada, Europe, Australia, Japan or Hong Kong for serious learning and better university's experience. He told us that he even studied all his degrees in Canada and Germany after his high school in the US, because his parents were not pleased with the US university's experience for young kids.

l heeded that American advise and went to Mcgill University in Canada, but tried to visit the US anyway, because my little sister was persuaded by her Kenyan friends to go US.

And what l found in the US is not what these creepy journalists in the V.O.A always try to sell others who know what the US really is. l told myself then that straight talking Duke University lecturer advised was spot on after all.

The US is a segregated community country, with the names like black neighborhoods, white neighborhoods, affluent neighborhoods and all.

There are also a lot of homeless who live under bridges and something to do with racism was always on the nightly prime time news. Not that there are no good deeds from America, but those hollywood hypes spread out to the world with the use of propaganda are aren't going to fool anyone or people who are taught to think for themselves.


by: Lisa from: Tx
June 26, 2014 9:56 PM
South sudanese people, we must not let go of our faith or hope, just hang in there Jesus have never forgotten about the innocent, the suffering all that we must trust in God. with all our heart for sake of divine mercy. The reason is we are fighting against big evil. I believe God knows, but one day we will overcome the evil government. Even the UN, USA will not bring peace in my country but God will use his loving people at the of the world to bring peace. It happen in American that the powerful country will never have a black presendent. God appointed Mr obama as the presendent lord know his heart, he called for poor, disable people and people who where disregarded by their communities, so why let go of hope, faith in God. They will come a time when we will select whom you believe in. Who spoke about peace, who ask for forgiveness, who ask for the voice of the voiceless to be hard. So if you trust in the lord, you better believe me.peace is coming.

In Response

by: Nyakor from: US
June 28, 2014 1:52 AM
"If you trust in the Lord, you better believe me. Peace is coming"
God bless you lisa, for such an awesome faith.

Psalm 130:7
7 People of Israel, put your hope in the Lord
because he is loving
and able to save.

This message is for us too.(South Sudan) May God bless us all!!!

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