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South Sudan, Rebels Consider Cease-fire

Both Sides Considering a Cease-fire in South Sudani
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January 08, 2014 7:53 AM
Delegates for South Sudan's government and the rebels trying to overthrow it are considering a cease-fire proposal.

Both Sides Considering a Cease-fire in South Sudan

VOA News
Delegates for South Sudan's government and the rebels trying to overthrow it are considering a cease-fire proposal.
 
Regional mediators from the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD), which has been negotiating a peace framework in Addis Ababa after talks had been delayed for days, later flew to South Sudan's capital, Juba, to meet with government officials there.
 
IGAD, an East African bloc, says the talks are focused on achieving a cease-fire and determining the status of pro-rebel officials detained by the government last month.

South Sudan areas of conflict and areas that are rebel-heldSouth Sudan areas of conflict and areas that are rebel-held
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South Sudan areas of conflict and areas that are rebel-held
South Sudan areas of conflict and areas that are rebel-held
The rebels are insisting the detainees be released. The government says it can release them only after "legal procedures" are carried out.
 
The violence in South Sudan has killed more than 1,000 people and forced about 200,000 from their homes.

In a Tuesday briefing, U.N. deputy spokesman Farhan Haq said there are reports of continued fighting near the rebel-held town of Bor, capital of Jonglei state.
 
Haq said U.N. peacekeepers reported seeing villages burned and looted in Unity state, and local officials report severe food and water shortages.
 
Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir on Monday visited South Sudan, where he thanked South Sudanese President Salva Kiir for a "warm welcome" and pledged his government will not support rebels in South Sudan or in any neighboring country.
 
In the past, the two Sudans have accused each other of supporting rebels on the other's territory.
 
In an interview with VOA English to Africa, Ahmed Bilal, Sudan's Minister of Information, was asked if Khartoum will send any forces across the border.
 
"We will not, actually, unless, of course, the peace council in the [African Union] considered this and decided to send troops or something like that," he said. "But now, separately, we will not send any troops to the South."
 
South Sudan's unrest began December 15 when renegade soldiers attacked an army headquarters.  President Kiir accused former vice president Riek Machar of a coup attempt. Machar has called for the army to overthrow the president.
 
Witnesses say some of the violence is ethnically motivated, with supporters of Mr. Kiir, a member of the Dinka tribe, and supporters of Machar, from the Nuer tribe, targeting each other.
 
The U.N. refugee agency says it is struggling to keep up with the humanitarian needs of the thousands of South Sudanese refugees who have crossed into Uganda to escape violence. The agency says refugees are now crossing into Uganda at a rate of up to 2,500 a day.
 
The agency also says a growing number of refugees are also making their way into Ethiopia and Kenya.

PHOTOS: Crisis in South Sudan
  • Displaced people who fled the recent fighting between government and rebel forces in Bor by boat across the White Nile, prepare to sleep in the open in the town of Awerial, South Sudan, Jan. 1, 2014.
  • A young displaced boy rests on the wheel arch of a water truck while others fill containers from it, at a United Nations compound on the outskirts of Juba, the South Sudanese capital.
  • Yared, 2, is held by mother Madhn who fled from the town of Bor a few days ago, as she receives medicine for her child at a Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) medical tent at a United Nations compound.
  • Displaced people gather under a mosquito net tent as they flee from fighting between the South Sudanese army and rebels in Bor town, 180 km (112 miles) northwest from capital Juba December 30, 2013.
  • A soldier from South Sudan's army stands guard in Malakal in the Upper Nile State of South Sudan, Dec. 31, 2013.
  • A young displaced girl carries a bucket of water back to her makeshift shelter at a United Nations compound which has become home to thousands of people displaced by the recent fighting, in the Jebel area on the outskirts of Juba.
  • The U.N.'s top humanitarian official in South Sudan, Toby Lanzer, assesses the situation at the U.N. compound where many displaced have sought shelter in Bentiu, Unity state, South Sudan, Dec. 24, 2013. (UNMISS)
  • A pirogue packed with passengers arrives at a dock after crossing a waterway near the town of Malakal, seen from an airplane over South Sudan, Dec. 30, 2013.
  • U.N.'s top humanitarian official in the country Toby Lanzer, left, makes a visit to assess the humanitarian situation at the U.N. compound where many displaced have sought shelter in Bentiu, in oil-rich Unity state, in South Sudan, Dec. 24, 2013.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: George Olweny from: Southsudan juba
January 08, 2014 8:50 AM
I have lost brother and sister in this tribalism war the best friends from Nuer.maymighty father rust there soul internal pace.actualy we are waiting our's is coming let grant equatoria to open there eye on the movement of Dinka from now.the action to equatorian


by: Riek Yak Guandong from: South sudan
January 07, 2014 1:36 PM
Not at all for the rebel to accept ceasefire since Kiir is not ready for peace if he was ready for peace why did he brought the Uganda n Sudan army? Kiir must be taken to the ICC for the death of 10,000 innocent women n Nuer childrens. Kiir must first release 11 detainees before any progress. Even if the dealt has to reach no civilians will go out of UNMISS compound due to fear that they may be killed. The only solution is removal of Kiir.

In Response

by: Gai tito reng from: melbourne,australia
January 08, 2014 12:25 AM
All of you above with the comment are wrong,and you need to review your comment.1-president did not start the war,2,it was started by this unknown who call himself doctor,by word but its does not comply with with what he is saying nor doing at all.this is not the first ,time but third time for such a useless war driven by the good leader of whom call Reik warlord who does not even think of where his future is taking him,but do not make mistake this time he is going to the Hague,president kiir was elected by whole south Sudanese,he did not took the power by force and thank


by: prince patrice from: Rwanda
January 07, 2014 8:39 AM
Why Africa real its pitty, as i see critically president kiir is betroying his country that's all and all these endless wars in Africa are being watched,supported by superpowers as what happened to Rwanda during Genocide in 1994 after sudan keep watching next

In Response

by: Xaaji Dhagax from: Somalia
January 08, 2014 4:04 AM
Do not blame western powers for the destructions and atrocities we, Africans, commit against ourselves. Both men, President Salva Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar together committed war against humanity. Both men are criminals and should be punished. The good people of South Sudan just came out of domination, slavery, killings and rape in the hands of Khartoum authority. And now these TWO irresponsible politicians caused their own people to run into refugee camps at neighbouring countries. Western powers have got nothing to do with this war.

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