News / Africa

South Sudan Ruling Party Official Urges More Targeted Sanctions

Rebel fighters hold up their rifles as they walk in front of a brushfire in a rebel-controlled territory in Upper Nile State, South Sudan, Feb. 13, 2014.
Rebel fighters hold up their rifles as they walk in front of a brushfire in a rebel-controlled territory in Upper Nile State, South Sudan, Feb. 13, 2014.
Peter Clottey
A leading member of South Sudan’s ruling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) has called on the international community to follow America’s lead by putting additional pressure on the government in Juba in a bid to help quickly resolve that country’s conflict.

Rebecca Nyandeng, widow of SPLM founder John Garang, welcomed President Barack Obama’s executive order that paved the way for U.S. sanctions against anyone threatening the stability of South Sudan, as well as those committing human-rights abuses.

“Somebody like me would welcome what President Obama did, because it is us in Juba who pushed the international community so hard for us being stubborn not to accept to reach an agreement, while the people of South Sudan are yearning for that,” said Nyandeng. “Those people who are suffering under the trees, those in refugee camps, none of us as leaders are thinking about them, and the raining season is almost here.”

But in reaction to Obama’s executive order, the administration in Juba accused the United States of meddling in its internal affairs by trying to influence the ongoing peace negotiations in Ethiopia aimed to resolve South Sudan’s security crisis.

Nyandeng disagreed that the U.S. is meddling in South Sudan’s internal affairs.

“They always criticize anybody who tells them that what [they] are doing is wrong. They criticized the UN and the representative of the UN Secretary-General. They don’t want to hear anybody telling them that they are making a mistake,” said Nyandeng.

She expressed regret about allegations of ongoing human rights violations in the conflict.

Nyandeng said more targeted sanctions serve as an incentive for the leaders in Juba to find a solution to the conflict.

“Individual sanctions [are] very important, because the government is doing what they wish. If there is no pressure they can be stubborn at the talks in Addis Ababa [Ethiopia]. But if there is international pressure, I think they would listen,” said Nyandeng.

Some observers have called for targeted sanctions on officials of both the government as well as rebels allied to former vice president Riek Marchar.

Nyandeng, however, says additional sanctions on senior officials of the administration are likely to expedite the peace negotiations.

“The government has been stubborn because the international community [called] for the release of all political detainees, but they only released seven and left four with one under house arrest. They are also denying the seven released detainees from participating in the negotiations and this is where the problem comes from,” said Nyandeng.

She says it is the responsibility of President Salva Kiir’s government to reach a negotiated settlement with the rebels as part of its mandate to protect civilians as enshrined in the constitution

The conflict in South Sudan started when the government accused former vice president Riek Machar of plotting to overthrow President Kiir’s administration. Machar denies the accusation.

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Comments
     
by: Maria Opella Martinez from: Florida, United States
April 10, 2014 11:37 AM
What they did was wrong. It was one of the worst things a person can ever possibly do. The people suffered and they didn't seem to really care. It just breaks my heart to understand that this can happen to anyone anywhere. It could happen to my children. I think the world needs a alarm clock. So they can wake up and see what is happening to people everyday. Racism is not okay.

by: J.Chin Jacob from: Aweil, South Sudan
April 08, 2014 5:06 PM
Just say SPLM in Opposition member has call for more sanction instead of SPLM, but Nyandeeng should put this in her thicky and shallow mind that she is not far from that target sanction if there would be any because she has played a big game in inciting innocent civilians through her informal report on BBC.

by: Manyiki from: USA
April 08, 2014 11:06 AM
God blesses Nyadeng and America for pushing problem-solving solution to end horrendous war. President Salva Kiir and Riek both are leaders of chaos. They need to be let go for people of S.Sudan to live in peace. No one in S. Sudan wants to war except president Kiir deceiving himself that the war will crown a dictator for life. Rebels's leader Riek complicate matters by using military to bring down a rogue regime. An interim govt without both is all needed right now in S.Sudan.

by: Human Eaters from: Juba
April 08, 2014 10:54 AM
If there is no key witness against them then they should be release so that the can join peace process in Addis Ababa. If there is any strong witness against them and then it is good and well so that they can be huge at the neck until their feet fly in the air like 500 people who sentenced death by court of law.
No future of this Country.

by: David Ayii from: us
April 08, 2014 9:56 AM
Good job madam nyandengdit.what happened would not had happen.but becuse of emty head; no coup million times. But silense others for no reason cause of it; kiir have to go for peace to come home and reconciliation then.

by: Raan Jal from: Juba, south sudan
April 08, 2014 9:03 AM
what I know Rebecca Nyandeng, is the one who caused the panic in south sudan, everyone know this, how can she dared to made an alliance with one criminal called Riek Machar the one who rebellion against her late husband Dr. John Garang in 1991, did she forgot that history? any how if the people of SOuth Sudan forgive them, the history will not forgive them at all.
In Response

by: Leto Mark from: Torit ,South Sudan
April 08, 2014 10:58 AM
You mighty be right but i'm afraid the sanction willnot be just because it excludes the objectives of the rulling party,u can sanction the individuals well but ,what about the innocent population of south sudan?,will u also sanctify them?,ofcourse no!!.
Thus,the US shuold study the route cause of the conflict,allow humanitarian aid,as well as seriously taking part in the negotiations.Remeber,foreign prifacy.

by: Ayom Mawien Arou from: warrap state
April 08, 2014 6:26 AM
I think, Madam Rebecca has forgotten that she is party to National crisis given her actions before violence sparked off in Mid- Dec last year. If sanctions are to be imposed on senior government officials, she should not be an exception, so she must bear that in mind.
I even blamed President Kiir for failing or refusing to arrest her together with those power-hungry politicians because they have been holding rallies which led to coup together.At one point even, Nyandeeng had to abandon women peace conference in Nairobi in early Dec and returned to Juba for the rally organised by the current group leading rebellion with others under trial for treason.

by: madinatonj from: juba
April 08, 2014 5:53 AM
by madina tonj recbecca shuold be the frist to be sanction by us because she is the rootcuse of this confict
In Response

by: leto Mark from: Torit(SOUTH SUDAN)
April 08, 2014 9:45 AM
I think that mighty happen but also i would say those who areinvoive in this hummilations indirectly or directly should be sanctified .imean both of the warig couples should shouder thi horrendos attacks!!!.

by: Iwa from: Nimule
April 08, 2014 3:35 AM
Miss Rebecca is the first to be sanction,you and your so call son Mabior has hand on the suffering of s Sudanese.

by: Sam Dave from: USA
April 08, 2014 2:26 AM
Good job Rebecca Nyandeng, widow of SPLM/A founder, the late John Garang Mabior. I like your idea on president Obama's sanctions. The government of South Sudan needs more pressure on senior officials. If president Obama give government of South Sudan senior officials individual sanctions. I believe the peace of Addis Ababa will end and the war of the South Sudan will stop.
Here are some people that Obama needs sanctions on them.
1. Mr. President Kiir
2.Mr. VP Wani
3. The radical minister of information, Micheal Makuei Lueth. Who talked like primitive.
4. Mr. Aleu Ayieny Aleu
5. Mr. Wek Ateny Wek
6. Mr. Telar Deng
7. Minister of defense Kuol Manyang
8. Mastermind murderer, Marial Canuok
9. Greater liar, Marial Benjamin
10. Mr. Mach Paul
Those people that I mentioned above are the most popular people who are behind the President of wrongdoing hence the President said something, they turned out. For instance, President Kiir agreed to release all eleven political detainees, and reduce Uganda's military in South Sudan then those guys turned down the President and weight war on angrily civilians fighters who were angrily because the Juba's incidents, when Mr. Kiir ordered cammander Marial Canuok against nuer tribe. My President Kiir, let me tell you the truth, your caused this war. The lives of innocent people who died in this senseless war will be on you and Riek Machar had his own old problem that he did in 1991. But don't caused this problem and accused Machar because he did something in 1991. You have your own problems, like in 2004. You was against John Garang Mabior because of some kind of like C.P.A agreement, Nhial Deng Nhial not to be your leader in a greater Bahrain El Gazal region, and your former Vice president Riek Machar not to be duty of John Garang.


In Response

by: Ban Riko wulino from: camapala
April 08, 2014 9:45 AM
i think Obama did very good job of targeting both side in order to grantee safety of innocent people from killing by those blood suckers.
In Response

by: Iwa from: Nimule
April 08, 2014 8:30 AM
Dear sam dave.
it seem you are not S Sudanese,so not coment like a lost child and indeed your a lost Child.

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