News / Asia

Student Organizations to Disrupt Hong Kong's Business District

Joshua Wong, a student leader in the Occupy Central movement handouts leaflets near a polling station to urge people to vote on the last day for an unofficial referendum on democratic reform in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
Joshua Wong, a student leader in the Occupy Central movement handouts leaflets near a polling station to urge people to vote on the last day for an unofficial referendum on democratic reform in Hong Kong, June 29, 2014.
VOA News

Several student groups say they plan to disrupt Hong Kong's business district Tuesday as part of a massive pro-democracy rally.

Zhou Yongkang, secretary-general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students, told VOA’s Mandarin Service Monday that his organization will participate in civil disobedience to call for electoral changes that would curb Beijing's control of the Chinese territory.

Occupy Central, a pro-reform movement that organized an unofficial referendum in which nearly 800,000 Hong Kongers voted on plans for electoral autonomy from Beijing, will live-stream Tuesday's event from Hong Kong's Victoria Park. Zhou said it is a moment to apply pressure, but peacefully.

“This will be a way to show to society this is exactly what the Occupy movement is about. It can be a peaceful, non-violent and orderly way to carry out this process," he said. "It will be a ripple effect, to push the government, to make it understand that it really has a crisis in governance here.”

Organizers anticipate that hundreds of thousands of protestors will turn out Tuesday.

July 1 is a public holiday in Hong Kong, marking the anniversary of its handover from British to Chinese rule in 1997.

This year, it also comes two days after the close of the Occupy Central referendum. According to the initial results from the University of Hong Kong’s Public Opinion Polling Center, approximately 792,800 people voted on three plans that would allow for electoral autonomy in Hong Kong.

China has said Hong Kongers can vote for their elected officials in 2017, but only from a list of candidates selected by Beijing.

This report was written in collaboration with the VOA Mandarin Service

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by: Nige from: Canada
July 02, 2014 2:46 AM
The basic law of HK (effective in 1997) said Hong Kongers can vote for their elected officials in 2017, but China confirms the list of candidates. Now some HK guys wanted to change it and don't want China confirm the lists of candidates. These HKs are actually violating the basic law of HK and don’t want to follow it.

One key thing is how to select candidates by general voters? HK didn't even realize free election during UK governance, these HK people should provide a proposal to China government instead of wasting lots of time protesting. Please remembered that HK people didn't have election rights under UK governance at all, and they didn't have any experience in democracy and free election and really should talk with China peacefully, e.g. some real proposal for free elections for candidates, China needs a better HK for sure, right? Do you really think China want to damage its baby, HK?

Please also remember US didn't realize free elections by all voters to choose the candidates of presidents. You can do some research how Republicans and Democrats choose their candidates of president.

by: NG from: Canada
July 02, 2014 2:23 AM
Why many HK people spent much time on politics and focused on politics too much? Whoever can develop economy and society better can be chosen as the leader of HK, no matter who nominate or confirm the candidates. Even if China government needs to confirm the candidates of HK leader, I don't think China government would like to confirm an incapable person as the HK leader, HK is part of China and a window to the western world, China government is supposed to help choose the best leader to ensure HK's economy and society as promising as possible. China has promised election of HK leader in 2017, nobody knows how good or how bad the elected leader is, why bother a lot now?

UK and US should not interrupt HK much now, HK is a baby of China, I think China will care about HK much more than other countries. Actually China helps HK much for HK's economy in the past years. Anti-China leader may not be as good as pro-beijing leader, after all, HK is so close to China mainland, and China mainland is a larger economic partner with HK. If anti-China leader is not that capable or damage HK's economy, China would still pay the bill and price for anti-China leader's mistakes in HK since HK belongs to China, it is actually not fair. China is finally responsible for HK development since HK is anyway a part of China ALTHOUGH HK has independent law and legal systems from mainland China. Make sense?

If anti-China leader in HK is elected someday, he is not supposed to do whatever he wants to do for HK since China is finally responsible for HK development. HK people should not attribute all unpleasant things or bad things to China. In fact, mainland China paid huge efforts developing HK economy due to HK's importance as an international port.

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
July 01, 2014 1:46 AM
Hong Kong irritates China. What China really fears is that ehe demand for election will spread into the Mainland. China also see these demonstrations as being instigated by Britain and US to spread discontent and take action as proxies to undermine China's exercise of sovereignty.
In Response

by: Adam9 from: Dong Nai, Vietnam
July 01, 2014 6:08 PM
Thank you for sharing your insight, Frankie !!

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
July 01, 2014 1:07 AM
Recent opinion surveys conducted in Hong Kong discovered that the percentage of Hong Kong identifying themselves as Chinese has dropped to a new low. The younger the Hong Konger, the less he or she feels like to identify being Chinese.

by: Anonymous
July 01, 2014 12:49 AM
too simple, sometimes naive

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
June 30, 2014 10:10 PM
The idiotic Beijing administration published a White Paper on the rule of Hong Kong which aggravated the situation and stirred up more dissatisfaction.

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
June 30, 2014 10:06 PM
If China chooses to ignore these demonstrations over these few days and adopt the position revealed in the Global Times, the One Country Two Systems promised in 1997 transfer of sovereignty is going to be buried. Hong Kong people especially those who are young and in the middle and lower classes are deeply frustrated politically and economically.

by: Reality
June 30, 2014 7:56 PM
I believe it is time to see whether Chris Patten was voted as the last governor of Hong Kong. Although one country two system was offered to Hong Kong by the center government, I believe the center government had the right to choose the governor of the city. Democracy doesn't mean you can do whatever you want.
In Response

by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
June 30, 2014 10:29 PM
The Basic Law promised that Hong Kong people can choose their own leader. The Joint Declaration between China and UK ensures that Hong Kong will have one country two systems, H K people can govern themselves and have the high autonomy. Judicial independence is also assured.

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