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    Sudan-South Sudan Restart Oil Talks Amid Bitter Rhetoric

    South Sudan's chief negotiator Pagan Amum gives a press conference after Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and his South Sudan counterpart Salva Kiir failed to resolve a dispute over oil after negotiations in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, January 27
    South Sudan's chief negotiator Pagan Amum gives a press conference after Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir and his South Sudan counterpart Salva Kiir failed to resolve a dispute over oil after negotiations in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, January 27

    Sudan and South Sudan have opened another round of talks on oil revenues and other contentious issues with harsh words and dampened expectations. Both sides appear to be holding to hard-line positions.

    South Sudan's chief negotiator Pagan Amum went into the opening session Tuesday of 10 days of African Union-mediated talks accusing  Khartoum of hostile acts on the ground even as it negotiates in Addis Ababa.

    "We are concerned the government of Sudan is beating the drums of war. They are mobilizing, according to them, to wage war against South Sudan. That is what the leadership of the government of Sudan are engaged in today as we speak," said Amum.

    Seemingly intractable positions

    Amum spoke as word arrived of fresh clashes along the loosely defined border. The United Nations refugee agency quoted new arrivals at camps in South Sudan as saying they were fleeing because of aerial bombardment and the fear of fresh violence.

    Southern negotiator Amum told VOA he had not seen any positive development since the last round of talks ended in deadlock last month. The two sides are far apart, with Sudan demanding oil transit and processing fees totaling $36 a barrel, and South Sudan offering to pay only 69 cents a barrel.

    Amum suggested the South would not budge from its offer.

    "The figures really for transit fee is 69 cents. They will have to accept that. If they don't accept that, then there will be no deal," said Amum.

    With the future of the talks in question, the African Union issued a statement Monday urging the international community to pressure the two sides to abandon their hard-line positions. The statement said progress is urgently needed on each of the three tracks in the talks - oil revenue sharing, citizenship questions left over from South Sudan's independence, and border issues.

    Diplomat's high hopes

    Khartoum's negotiators were not immediately available for comment as the talks began. But a senior official of Sudan's ruling National Congress Party was quoted as saying the south's negotiating team would have to be changed before the talks could progress.

    In an interview with the English-language Sudan Vision newspaper, party spokesman Ibrahim Ghandour called chief southern negotiator Amum a warlord who has no interest in peace. Ghandour said Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir had recently told South Sudan's leader Salva Kiir that Amum was not the right person to head the negotiating team.

    But a Sudanese diplomat attending the talks suggested Tuesday that despite the harsh rhetoric, progress still might be possible. The diplomat, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said he is cautiously optimistic because both countries desperately need the oil revenue that has been cut off during their dispute.

    South Sudan shut down its oil production in January, accusing Khartoum of stealing from the pipeline that carries crude from southern oil fields though Sudan to international markets. Oil accounts for as much as 97 percent of the South's income, and a lesser but critical percentage of the north's.

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    Comments
         
    by: william
    March 07, 2012 3:11 AM
    israel want to Repatriating South Sudanese in april 1st, but for me in my opinion that's not a right time for a country like israel to do so let world tell them to give us time more. south sudan is now still in war with sudan

    by: George Lot.
    March 07, 2012 1:58 AM
    Pagan don't waste your time

    Dear Hon.
    I said don't waste your time with these Jallabas by negotiating the issue of our oil issue come back to Juba inorder to put things into practice, what i meant to come and mobilized our southerners to start digging of petroleum pipeline,to Kenya and DJibouti,we starved for twenty one years,did we received any Salary. God is great, let us be like birds which doesn't have farms and still can survive.

    by: Truesage Idowu
    March 06, 2012 11:34 PM
    South Sudan must build new pipelines to neighboring Kenya as transit route for its crude. It is share stupidity to enrich ones arch-enemy. Friendship with Kenya, Ethiopia and Israel will bring succor and relieve to the war torn nation and aid in ensuring that none of the resources of the south is shared between the imperialist north. Also an attack on resources of the south must be met with an attack on the resources and people of the north.

    by: Anyang Riak
    March 06, 2012 11:09 PM
    Oyee wen de Amum. The southerners are hundered precent behind you. Never let up! Don't relents any course!! You're the champion. And we need you to disarms the mudukuri. May God bless you and be with you all the way!

    by: hamad part 1 of 2
    March 06, 2012 8:46 AM
    North Sudan can not be more tolerant with those rebels who have hidden in South Sudan . Actually, wars has been undergoing since ages ,so North can not leave its merit of oil without resistance . Why do you think that US has been spreading its soldiers and military bases around the world ? Because it is only the way to protect their trade and oil business . As result , Americans oil have been exported and sold to other countries as well as cheap Egyptian gas while gas prices

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