News / Africa

Sudan Rejects South Sudan Oil Offer

Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir attends the African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, July 15, 2012.Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir attends the African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, July 15, 2012.
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Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir attends the African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, July 15, 2012.
Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir attends the African Union summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, July 15, 2012.
Gabe Joselow
NAIROBI, Kenya — Sudan is giving a cool response to several South Sudanese proposals aimed at rejuvenating peace talks and oil production. Khartoum wants to settle security issues before considering Juba's offers.

Sudan says the South Sudanese proposals, submitted Monday at African Union-mediated talks in Addis Ababa, do not break new ground.

The package included an offer aimed at ending an impasse over oil, with a promise that Juba would pay up to $9.10 per barrel to transport oil through northern pipelines.

Attempt to meet in middle

The offer would be a compromise for both countries, if accepted. South Sudan had previously insisted on paying about $1 per barrel, while Sudan had demanded a price around $36.

South Sudan also has offered to pay $3.2 billion to Sudan in cash over three-and-a-half years to compensate for economic losses Khartoum suffered as a result of the south's separation last year.

Sudanese Foreign Ministry Undersecretary Rahmatullah Mohamed Osman said his country will take the South's proposals into account.

“This is an offer which is subject to negotiation. It is not just piecemeal. We are talking about oil issues, so this offer should be tabled to our negotiators and then they will reach a solution. They are offering something and it is linked to other things,” said Osman.

Continuing dispute frays economies

Meanwhile, Sudanese negotiator Mutrif Sidiq told reporters in Addis Ababa there is nothing new in South Sudan's offer, and said security issues remain a top priority.

A spokesman for South Sudan's negotiating team did not answer calls for comment.

South Sudan shut down oil production in January after accusing Sudan of stealing southern oil from northern pipelines and ports. Sudan claims it had confiscated oil to make up for unpaid transit fees. The shutdown has weakened both countries' economies.

The two Sudans fought clashes along their border this spring as tension nearly boiled over into war.

Finalizing borders, Abyei ownership

South Sudan last week issued a complaint to the AU mediating panel, accusing the Sudanese air force of bombing southern territory. Sudan said it was pursuing Darfur rebels north of the border.

South Sudan's proposal calls for the establishment of joint border teams that will work together to resolve the final demarcation of the border.

It also recommends holding a referendum in Abyei by November of this year to let the people decide which country will get control of the oil-producing region.

A U.N. Security Council resolution has ordered Sudan and South Sudan to reach agreement by August 2 on the issues left unresolved from the South's separation last year.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Anonymous
July 24, 2012 7:17 PM
Greedy North Sudanese. What do the South owes them? I blame the South leadership for offering 3.2 billion to the North.


by: SAMSON from: TEXAS
July 24, 2012 2:10 PM
LET THE UNITED SATATES OF AMERICA TAKE CARE OF THE PROBLEM,AFRICAN LEADERS DONT LEARN FROM THE PAST,CORRUPTED LEADERS ,EXCEPT OF COURSE ERITREAN LEADER


by: Dave McKay from: Australia
July 24, 2012 2:00 PM
I do not think South Sudan need pay one cent to Sudan to compensate for separation from the North. Are the North going to compensate the South for the 2 million Southerners who died from deliberate starvation etc in the war??? And what about the war crimes of Bashir and his Gov and military???

In Response

by: Megan Ware from: UK
July 25, 2012 1:53 PM
Nono, if you think that people who are not Sudanese or South Sudanese should not comment on the situation, you presumably also think that other countries should not be paying for the negotiations to take place (in very expensive hotels). Or should foreign countries only be bankrolling the negotiations but keeping their mouths shut? Sounds a bit unfair to me.

In Response

by: kiir from: Canada
July 24, 2012 7:53 PM
The North Sudan should accepted the Offer from the RSS without any condition, otherwise Omer and his member of government their lives is in a thin wire as we can see the roof is liking. This roof's requested technicion don't you think??.Why SS have to pay for compensate???North S should pay the SS deliberate starvation for the war century upon today...Not SS!!

In Response

by: nono
July 24, 2012 6:20 PM
Dave, if south sudan offers to pay sudan for the sake of peace, it is noble thing to do. but it should not concern you cause it is between two brotherly african states. i don't think you should be commenting in this matter.

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