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Supreme Court Takes Up Controversial Immigration Law

Mark Jenkins (L), an opponent of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 and Blake Sutherland (R), a supporter of the bill, discuss their opposite viewpoints outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, April 25, 2012.
Mark Jenkins (L), an opponent of Arizona Senate Bill 1070 and Blake Sutherland (R), a supporter of the bill, discuss their opposite viewpoints outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, April 25, 2012.

The issue of illegal immigration took center stage Wednesday in Washington as the Supreme Court heard oral arguments for and against a controversial immigration law in the state of Arizona.

Whichever way the high court rules in the Arizona case is likely to have sweeping legal and political implications.

Outside the Supreme Court, demonstrators on both sides of Arizona’s illegal immigration law made their feelings known not only through song, but prayer.

“We ask Lord that you would touch us today and that you would touch those who are in this building deliberating, Lord,” prayed a woman.

Inside, the justices heard oral arguments both for and against the Arizona statute aimed at cracking down on the estimated 400,000 immigrants who have entered the state illegally.

One of the key provisions of the Arizona law requires police to check on the immigration status of people they stop or detain if they suspect that person is in the country illegally.  Another part of the law makes it a state crime for illegals to hold a job or seek work.

Court demonstrations

Among those supporting the law outside the court was Ken Moreau, a police officer from Maryland.

“We have to have reasonable limits on immigration," said Moreau. "Our country has not only the right, but the responsibility to place reasonable limits on immigration, and so when we have 11- or 12-million people here illegally, that is a huge problem.”

Supporters of the Arizona law also argue the state was forced to take action to protect it borders because the federal government had failed to do so.

George Pope from Virginia also demonstrated in support of the law in front of the Supreme Court.

“At this particular time it is more of a states’-rights issue versus a federal issue, and an administration that is not really adhering to our border situation and immigration run amok,” he said.

The Obama administration sued Arizona and has blocked parts of the law in lower courts, arguing the responsibility for safeguarding national borders lies with the federal government, not the individual states.

But during oral arguments, several of the justices seemed to suggest they might uphold Arizona’s right to check the immigration status of those stopped by police.

Opponents of the law were also out in force in front of the high court, including Reverend Mari Castellanos, a minister with the United Church of Christ who emigrated to the United States from Cuba when she was a young girl.

“When I came to this country I was received with open arms and they showered opportunity upon me because the U.S. government hates the Cuban government," she said. "But I tell you what happened, my family thrived.  We all went to college.  We all have done very well and that is what happens when you welcome an immigrant. They can do very well.”

Opponents of the Arizona law also contend that requiring police to check on people’s immigration status will lead to racial profiling.

“The fact is that we have outlawed racial profiling. It is against the law," said Representative Luis Gutierrez, a Democrat from Illinois. "The question today is, will the Supreme Court uphold the right of American citizens to be able to travel without being stopped and restrained and questioned because of the color of their skin and the accent of their voice?”

Presidential politics

How to deal with illegal immigration has emerged as a political issue in the 2012 presidential campaign and is a major concern to Hispanic voters across the country, the fastest-growing population in the United States

Several other states have enacted laws similar to the one in Arizona and eagerly await a decision from the Supreme Court, which is expected by the end of June.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: William
April 26, 2012 9:01 AM
Mr. Quinn of illinois, You were born to be my nightmare, With your dirty scam on the tax payers, I'm glad your a one term governor.


by: Mike
April 25, 2012 3:30 PM
It always comes down to either (1) an Open Boarder or (2) enforcing current federal law. Obama wants an open boarder so he can pander to the Mexican community. Very transparent. If so, simply eliminate all passports, visas, and drivers licenses at airports, terminals, and boarder crossings. Done.


by: William
April 25, 2012 11:29 AM
When the federal government can't do its job it must be the states that decide, But at the same time if you are an illegal alien go to illinois, It is a socialist paradise that takes money from private sector workers and finances the lives of public sector cronies and illegal aliens and denies hard working families when they fall on hard times.


by: Brad Naksuthin
April 25, 2012 10:51 AM
I predict that the court will do what it has always done....split along party lines with Justice Kennedy providing the swing vote.
We should just tell all the justices to take a vacation and let Kennedy be the decider.
Having Supreme Court with Judges picked by politicians is a big joke.
You can just expect that they'll vote their preconceived prejudices and not the merits of the case.

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