News / Europe

Swiss Voters Reject $25-an-Hour Minimum Wage, $3.5B Jet Deal

Swiss Defense Minister Ueli Maurer (L) and Economy Minister Johann Schneider-Ammann arrive for a news conference to discuss referendum results in Bern, Switzerland, May 18, 2014.
Swiss Defense Minister Ueli Maurer (L) and Economy Minister Johann Schneider-Ammann arrive for a news conference to discuss referendum results in Bern, Switzerland, May 18, 2014.
VOA News
Worried about upsetting Switzerland's strong economy or driving its high costs even higher, more than three-quarters of Swiss voters rejected a plan Sunday to create the world's highest minimum wage and slightly more than half spurned a request to outfit the Swiss Air Force with 22 new fighter jets.

About 76 percent of voters in the wealthy nation dismissed the proposal made by Swiss union SGB and backed by the Socialist and Green parties for a minimum wage of 22 Swiss francs ($25) per hour, final results showed, Reuters reported.

Meanwhile, some 53 percent blocked a government plan to free up funds to replace Switzerland's aging fleet of fighter jets with 22 Gripen jets from Saab. Just over 55 percent of those eligible voted, the government said.

The clear rejection of the proposed minimum wage brings relief to business leaders worried the measure would have hurt competitiveness and damaged the Swiss workplace.

"If the initiative had been accepted, without doubt that would have led to job cuts, particularly in remote and structurally weaker regions," Swiss Economy Minister Johann Schneider-Ammann said at a news conference. "The best remedy against poverty is work."

Widening income gap

Sunday's vote is the latest in a slew of initiatives being put to voters to try to address the widening income gap in the generally egalitarian country.

Switzerland has some of the world's highest living costs and trade unions had sought in the balloting to require minimum salaries for workers that would total more than $53,000 annually.  The median salary in the Alpine nation is now about $77,000, but pay is set by individual employment contracts or collective bargaining agreements.

The minimum pay referendum was the third in Switzerland in the last 18 months to deal with the increasing gap between rich and poor people. Voters previously adopted restrictions on bonuses for corporate executives, but rejected controls that would have limited their salaries to no more 12 times that of the lowest paid workers.

Switzerland's ruling Federal Council welcomed the defeat of the minimum wage plan sought by trade unions.

Trade unions had proposed the higher minimum wage as a way of fighting poverty in a country that, by some measures, features the world's highest prices and most expensive cities.

But opinion polls had indicated that most voters sided with the council and business leaders, who argued it would cost jobs and erode economic competitiveness, driving Switzerland's high costs even higher.

"A fixed salary has never been a good way to fight the problem," Schneider-Ammann said.

The proposal would have eclipsed the existing highest minimum wages in force elsewhere in Europe. Switzerland has no minimum wage, but the median hourly wage is about 33 francs ($37) an hour.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, which adjusts figures for spending power, lists the highest current minimum wage as Luxembourg's at $10.66 an hour, followed by France at $10.60, Australia at $10.21, Belgium at $9.97, and the Netherlands at $9.48.

The U.S. wage, an adjusted $7.11 down from the actual $7.25 rate, came 10th on the list.

Adjusted for its high prices, Switzerland's wage proposal would have represented about $14 an hour based on a 42-hour work week.

One voter, Rakesh Stehle, said he voted against the measure because he felt adoption of a minimum wage would actually cut salaries for many workers.

"I voted 'no' to the minimum wage because I think companies will take advantage of this and if there is a minimum wage they will impose the minimum wage on companies and it's negative because we will not have the salary we have now. Life is already very expensive and we should have a wage adapted to suit to the life we have,'' Stehle said.

'No' vote on jets

The "no" vote for the Gripen jets bucks a historic trend for public support for the military and runs counter to a referendum last September, in which the Swiss public voted overwhelmingly in favor of keeping military conscription.

The government had argued that Switzerland needed modern fighter jets - which are used to police the skies above Davos during the World Economic Forum - to support its armed forces and protect the country's stability.

"This decision will cause a security gap," Defense Minister Ueli Maurer said in reaction to the vote. "We will do everything we can to fill this gap in these difficult circumstances as quickly as is possible."

Switzerland was embarrassed earlier this year when a hijacked Ethiopian Airlines plane heading for Geneva had to be escorted by French and Italian fighter jets because the incident occurred outside normal business hours.

Although both the Swiss upper and lower houses of parliament backed the deal, Swiss interest groups - including the socialists, Greens and the Group for Switzerland without an Army - secured a referendum by collecting the 50,000 signatures needed to force the popular vote.

Opponents had argued buying the jets was an unnecessary expense, requiring cuts in other areas, such as education. They also said the cost of keeping the jets in operation would likely spiral to at least 10 billion francs over their lifetime.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

You May Like

Nigeria Incumbent in Tight Spot as Poll Nears

Muhammadu Buhari is running a strong challenge to Goodluck Jonathan, amid a faltering economy and Boko Haram security worries More

Video Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grieving

Beatrice Yardolo tells VOA that despite her fame, life is still a struggle as she waits for government's promise of support to arrive More

Video Cambodian Land Grabs Threaten Traditional Communities

At least seven different indigenous groups in Ratanakiri depend mainly on forest products for their survival, say they face loss of their land, traditional way of life More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Greg H from: Switzerland
May 19, 2014 3:31 AM
Liliane van Frankrijk: If it's such a pain for you to live here, why don't you go back to where you came from. Switzerland has one of the world's best economies and highest standard's of living. A overwhelming majority of workers here earn more than the minimum wage of $25. So to pay half of that for a Quarter-Pounder Meal at McD's makes perfect sense.

by: Shirleypittman from: 1821dora ave tavares flew
May 18, 2014 4:07 PM
My son is looking for a job he will be glad to make 37dollars per hour
.

by: Liliane van Frankrijk
May 18, 2014 3:18 PM
MacD's quarter-pounder with cheese, medium fries and medium drink: just under $15. Starbucks coffee, over $10. The attendants at the Berne museums make 22 an hour, even the ones who have worked there more than ten years. The hourly pay at McDonalds and Burger King is18 francs. If you work full time at these and many other jobs--obligatory 42 hour work week--you will spend most of your free time walking in the glorious countryside near your overpriced shabby tiny rented room because you can't afford train tickets to go somewhere or do anything. I now owe $2,458 for 90 minutes root canal work at the dentist in Berne, a standard rate. And P.S. a little packet of 15 tampons costs nine dollars. They've got you by the [...] here.

by: Hovhannes from: Montevideo
May 18, 2014 10:34 AM
Swiss voters made the right choice. Trade unions, on the other hand, want to bankrupt their country.

by: Curly4 from: US
May 18, 2014 9:46 AM
The smart citizens of this country rejected this proposal. It would have been detrimental to the economy. If this had passed it would have caused ALL wages to go higher. The unions would not allow their wage advantage to be eroded by an increase in the mandated minimum wage.
If the persons though that the nearly US$24/hr would have been good then a US$30 or US$40 minimum would have been much better. So why did they choose US$24 wage?

by: SStarkey from: Texas
May 18, 2014 9:10 AM
Wow. How much is Quarter Pounder over there...with cheese?

by: Gina from: USA
May 18, 2014 9:07 AM
Maybe the article title should read Swiss vote to end tourism.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grievingi
X
Benno Muchler
March 26, 2015 3:41 PM
Beatrice Yardolo was to make history as Liberia’s last Ebola patient. Liberians recently started counting down 42 days, the period that has to go by without a single new infection until the World Health Organization can declare a country Ebola-free. That countdown stopped on March 20 when there was another new case of Ebola, making Yardolo’s story a reminder that Ebola is far from over. Benno Muchler reports from Monrovia.
Video

Video Liberia's Almost Last Ebola Patient Grateful but Still Grieving

Beatrice Yardolo was to make history as Liberia’s last Ebola patient. Liberians recently started counting down 42 days, the period that has to go by without a single new infection until the World Health Organization can declare a country Ebola-free. That countdown stopped on March 20 when there was another new case of Ebola, making Yardolo’s story a reminder that Ebola is far from over. Benno Muchler reports from Monrovia.
Video

Video Cambodian Land Grabs Threaten Traditional Communities

Indigenous communities in Cambodia's Ratanakiri province say the government’s economic land concession policy is taking away their land and traditional way of life, making many fear that their identity will soon be lost. Local authorities, though, have denied this is the case. VOA's Say Mony went to investigate and filed this report, narrated by Colin Lovett.
Video

Video US, South Korea Conduct Joint Military Exercises

The Eighth U.S. Army Division and the Eighth Republic of Korea Mechanized Infantry Division put on a well orchestrated show of force for the media this week during their joint military training exercises in South Korea. VOA’s Seoul correspondent Brian Padden was there and reports the soldiers were well disciplined both in conducting a complex live fire exercise and in staying on message with the press.
Video

Video Space Program Status Disappoints 'Last Man on the Moon'

One of the films that drew big crowds last week at the annual South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, tells the story of the last human being to stand on the moon, U.S. astronaut Eugene Cernan. It has been 42 years since Cernan returned from the moon and he laments that no one else has gone there since. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports.
Video

Video Young Filmmakers Shine Spotlight on Giving Back

A group of student filmmakers from across the United States joined President Barack Obama at the White House this month for the second annual White House Student Film Festival. Fifteen short films were officially selected from more than 1,500 entries by students aged 6 through 18. The filmmakers and their families then joined the president and a group of celebrities for a screening of their films. VOA’s Julie Taboh reports.
Video

Video VOA Exclusive: Interview with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, during his first visit as president to Washington, gave a one-on-one interview with VOA Afghan Service reporter Said Suleiman Ashna, about his request for a change in U.S. troop levels, the threat from the Islamic State, and repairing relations with the United States and Pakistan. The interview was held at Blair House, late Sunday, in Pashto.
Video

Video California Science Center Tells Story of Dead Sea Scrolls

The ancient manuscripts were uncovered in the mid-20th century, and they are still yielding clues about life and religious beliefs in ancient Israel. As VOA's Mike O'Sullivan reports, an exhibit in Los Angeles shows how modern science is bringing the history of these ancient documents to life.
Video

Video Angelina Jolie Takes Another Bold Step

Hollywood actress and filmmaker Angelina Jolie has revealed she had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to lower her odds of getting cancer. Doctors say the huge publicity over her decision will help raise awareness about the importance of cancer screening. VOA’s George Putic has more

All About America

Circumventing Censorship

An Internet Primer for Healthy Web Habits

As surveillance and censoring technologies advance, so, too, do new tools for your computer or mobile device that help protect your privacy and break through Internet censorship.
More