News / Middle East

    Moves by Syrian Kurds Worry Turkey

    Syrian Kurds rally against Syrian President Assad in city of Qamishli (March 2012 photo)Syrian Kurds rally against Syrian President Assad in city of Qamishli (March 2012 photo)
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    Syrian Kurds rally against Syrian President Assad in city of Qamishli (March 2012 photo)
    Syrian Kurds rally against Syrian President Assad in city of Qamishli (March 2012 photo)
    Dorian Jones
    ISTANBUL — In Syria, the seizing of control by Syrian Kurds of towns close to the Turkish border has raised concerns in the Turkish capital, Ankara. Turkish authorities say Syrian Kurds might seek to create their own autonomous state, fueling similar demands from Turkey's Kurdish minority.

    News of Syrian Kurds taking control of towns from forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has raised concerns in Ankara, according to defense correspondent Metehan Demir of the Turkish newspaper Hurriyet.  He says long-standing Turkish fears of the creation of an independent Kurdish state have resurfaced.

    "It's perceived as a signal of a future autonomous area in this region, just next to the Turkish border.  This is second piece of a four piece puzzle on the way to a Kurdistan country.  Because one part is happening in northern Iraq, [a] second part is in Syria, east Kurdistan is [in] Iran and Northern Kurdistan as known according to their dreams is [the] Turkish part," Demir said.

    Ankara has been fighting a decades-long insurgency by the PKK, which wants greater Kurdish rights in Turkey.  Many PKK members are Syrian Kurds.

    According to international relations expert Soli Ozel of Istanbul's Kadir Has University, the main concern of the Turkish government is that the success of Syrian Kurds could fuel Turkey's Kurdish insurgency.

    "Since our Kurdish problem has not been solved, and we are not near to bringing to a conclusion, the prime minister will be concerned that there will be a fallout from what is going on in Syria, especially because in Syria the PKK-affiliated party appears to be the strong political force," Ozel said.

    In recent years, Ankara has developed strong ties with the leadership of the semiautonomous Iraqi Kurdish regional government.  That relationship is built on burgeoning border trade.  Sinan Ulgen of the EDAM research institute says Ankara will be looking to Iraqi Kurdish regional leader Masoud Barzani to temper the actions of Syrian Kurds.

    "Turkey [is] relying on political leadership of the Iraqi Kurds, in particular Barzani, to establish a relationship with the Syrian Kurds themselves.  And because of the success of this policy of engagement with the Iraqi Kurds since 2008, this is the favored scenario in Ankara," Ulgen said.

    Ulgen acknowledges that Barzani has limited influence over the PKK and its affiliates in Syria.  And some questions are being raised in Turkey about Barzani's reliability as an ally.  Hundreds of Syrian Kurds who have sought refuge in Iraqi Kurdistan reportedly are returning to Syria with the support of Iraqi Kurds.

    "It was Barzani who actually brought all the Syrian Kurdish opposition together, and they came up with a pact and then everything unfolded since then.  So I really don't think the things happening in Syria are happening without his knowledge or consent," Ozel said.

    If Turkish diplomatic efforts fail to prevent PKK control in the Syrian Kurdish region, analyst Ulgen does not rule out Ankara pursuing a military solution.

    "On the more hawkish attitudes of intervention in order to undermine the PKK stranglehold in this region, which is something Turkey did do in the past with regard to northern Iraq.  Now that certainly is one scenario if the PKK starts to establish in the Kurdish region of northern Syria," Ulgen said.

    Turkish military forces have been reinforced along the border with Syria's Kurdish region.  Analysts say that although Ankara will be wary of any military operation, Turkey will be closely monitoring the actions of the Syrian Kurds.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: nur from: aus
    August 05, 2012 11:37 AM
    It is easy to watch from afar and comment, PKK is a rebel terorist group who kills civilians, many a children women men, innocent individuals have died at thier hands. A previous comment talks about Islam, the PKK have nothing to do with it, thier soldiers are not Martyr, they fight against thier own muslim brothers and sisters. Be mindful I am saying PKK and not Kurds. Turkey has withstood so much in its history, the Calife used to be in Istanbul during the rule of the Ottomon Empire, not until the Turkish Cumhurriyet was formed did we give up that title; otherwise, Turkey and Turkish people are the true holders of the calife and representative of Islam. The works of Said Nursi, who was a Kurd should be enough of an evidence as to the sibling relations between Turks and Kurds. The tolerance Turkey has shown Kurds is not seen anywhere around the world. I am not a kemalist, I loathe him and his laws. I believe in tolerance from both sides. All Turkey wants is to live side by side with Kurds as equals, brothers ans sisters; however, if they insist on creating thier own state and splitting Turkey, if it comes to that, so be it, but as history has shown time and time again, they will fail just as the arab nations have after stabbing the Ottomon Empire in the back. 100 years later Turkey is standing stong and getting stronger, may Allah protect the Turks and all Muslim brother and sisters

    by: ADEL ALSHEAR from: STOCKHOLM SWDEN
    July 28, 2012 4:20 AM
    THIS IS ANTI DISCIM KRDI . THIS IS ANTI KRDI DICRIM . THI S IS ANTI DISCRIM IN KRD. THI S IS ANTI KRD DISCRIM .THIS IS ANTI DISCRIM IN KRD .

    by: Malek Towghi (Baloch) from: USA
    July 27, 2012 1:48 AM
    The only unintended positive result of our intervention in Iraq was the emergence and strengthening of an Autonomous Kurdistan north of Iraq. Now that the same has happened, unwittingly, in Syria-occupied Kurdistan, it is our moral duty to help the Syrian Kurds maintain their self-rule and autonomy regardless of the results of the ongoing Syrian crisis. It is also in our national interest. The KURDS like their ethnic cousins, the BALUCH / the BALOCH, are least infected by anti-West religious obscurantism and chauvinist nationalism -- and are the only Muslim people in those fanaticism-ridden regions who can be our sincere and dependable friends. The civilized world particularly the West should not abandon the Kurds and the Baloch in this 21st century the way they shamelessly abandoned the Armenians in last century. Dr. Malek Towghi, Liaison, Baloch Human Rights International

    by: Coleen from: Germany
    July 26, 2012 11:30 PM
    yes Maria, it has been in the news here. Beautiful!!! AC/DC so funny...!!! they said that it was a US/Isarel operation... i wish Germany would have participated also... but we have becomed cowards here... these US/Israel guys are some of the most brilliant minds in the world

    by: khan
    July 26, 2012 7:22 PM
    turk is haunting his own action, will be continues to his country by PKK after Al Qaeda action finish in Syria

    by: Maria from: Germany
    July 26, 2012 3:52 PM
    hey guys... has anyone heard of the AC/DC worm that attacked Iran nuclear facilities??? that is hilarious... Israel - God, these guys are unbelievable!!!

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