News / Middle East

    Syrian Government Forces 25 Kilometers From Turkey's Border

    Syrians line up as they wait to cross into Syria at Oncupinar border crossing in the southeastern city of Kilis, Turkey, Feb. 8, 2016.
    Syrians line up as they wait to cross into Syria at Oncupinar border crossing in the southeastern city of Kilis, Turkey, Feb. 8, 2016.

    For the first time since August 2013, forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad are within 25 kilometers of the Turkish border in northern Syria.

    They continue to press a Russian-backed offensive that is throwing moderate rebel forces into disarray and despondency, say activists and insurgent commanders.

    Turkish officials are warning that the round-the-clock Russian air sorties and heavy fighting could spark the arrival of as many as 600,000 fleeing Syrian civilians at its border, but they reiterated their determination that the refugees  stay on the Syrian side of the frontier.

    “Our objective for now is to keep this wave of migrants on the other side of Turkey's borders as much as is possible, and to provide them with the necessary services there,” said Deputy Prime Minister Numan Kurtulmuş.

    WATCH: Related video by Zlatica Hoke

    Syrians Flee Death on 'Mass Scale'i
    X
    February 09, 2016 5:11 AM
    Syrians fleeing death in Russian air raids or in fighting between Syrian government troops and rebels are massing at the border with Turkey. Meanwhile, a United Nations report says detainees held by the Syrian government are being killed on a massive scale amounting to a state policy of "extermination" of the civilian population. Zlatica Hoke reports.

    Following a Cabinet meeting, he said, “As a consequence of this situation, we are seeing 200,000 people being forced to flee, 65,000 in the direction of Turkey and 135,000 inside Syria.”

    Multisided conflict

    The multisided conflict raging in the northern Aleppo countryside features regime forces, Western-backed Free Syrian Army militias and their allies, Islamist brigades, al-Qaida’s affiliate in Syria, the Kurds and the jihadist Islamic State group.

    Two mainly Sunni Arab villages in the northern Aleppo countryside, Deir Jamal and Mar’anaz, asked fighters with the Kurdish People’s Protection Units, the YPG, to occupy them in a bid to escape ferocious Russian airstrikes, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.

    Rebel commanders said YPG territory wasn't being bombed and that was clear evidence of collusion between Damascus and Syrian Kurdish leaders, a claim denied by the YPG.

     

    The fate of the strategically important air base at Menagh nearby remains unclear.

    The base, which anti-Assad rebels captured after a lengthy siege in August 2013, is being targeted by Russian warplanes, according to Zakaria Malahefji, the political officer of the 3,000-member Fastaqim Kama Umirt, a brigade aligned with the rebel alliance Jaish al-Mujahideen (Army of Holy Warriors).

    Kurdish fighters

    The YPG, however, holds two nearby villages, and reports mounted late Tuesday that the YPG had launched attacks on the base.

    General Salim Idris, the former FSA chief, who still advises moderate militias on strategy, told VOA that the YPG and Arab allies in the Syrian Democratic Forces had launched attacks on the base but they “have not taken it yet.”

    He said: “The YPG is supported by Russian warplanes and they are trying to take the base. We are fighting everyone — the Islamic State, the regime and the YPG. As ever, we are not getting the support, Western support, we need.”

    The YPG insists it is not colluding with the regime in the government offensive. YPG commanders say their control of Deir Jamal and a road running south has prevented the regime forces, mainly consisting of Iranian guardsmen and Shi’ite fighters from Lebanon’s Hezbollah movement and Afghanistan, from advancing.

    The YPG said it transferred Sunni Arab families fleeing the fighting to the Kurdish enclave of Afrin.

    The YPG said the refugee transfer aims “to prove to everyone that Syria is for all its citizens" and that the YPG "is not fighting Arabs as promoted by the media.”

    In this photo made from the footage taken from Russian Defense Ministry official web site on Feb. 1, 2016, an aerial image shows what it says is a column of heavy trucks carrying ammunition hit by a Russian air strike near Aleppo, Syria.
    In this photo made from the footage taken from Russian Defense Ministry official web site on Feb. 1, 2016, an aerial image shows what it says is a column of heavy trucks carrying ammunition hit by a Russian air strike near Aleppo, Syria.

    During the weekend, Salih Muslim, the leader of the Democratic Union Party that dominates the YPG, told VOA he doubted the current offensive would impact Syrian Kurdish hopes for semiautonomy.

    “The fighting is not in Kurdish areas, it is close to them. The Kurdish forces are not involved in the fighting, although some Arab allies of the YPG have been fighting Jabhat al-Nusra,” he added. He said the bulk of YPG forces to the east of the Euphrates would not cross west of the river unless it was in coordination with the U.S.-led international coalition against the Islamic State group. “It would be easy to do.”

    Drawn into fighting

    His biggest worry is that Turkish forces may be drawn into the fighting.

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has frequently warned Ankara would not stand by and allow Kurdish advances in northern Syria or the establishment of a semiautonomous Kurdish entity to emerge in northern Syria.

    FILE - Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses his supporters in Ankara, Jan. 28, 2016. Erdogan told the U.S. Sunday it had to choose between Turkey and the YPG, which it has partnered with to fight the Islamic State group.
    FILE - Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses his supporters in Ankara, Jan. 28, 2016. Erdogan told the U.S. Sunday it had to choose between Turkey and the YPG, which it has partnered with to fight the Islamic State group.

    Conditions at the border

    A Turkish official told VOA there were no plans by Ankara to open the border to the new refugees streaming toward it. A new camp is being established by the Turkish Red Crescent and IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation, a Turkish NGO, adding family tents to 20 collective tents erected earlier this week.

    According to the Turkish Red Crescent, 2,400 families have been registered at the new camp that is being built for about 15,000 people. There are another 5,000 refugees scattered nearby.

    According to VOA’s translator, who crossed the border Tuesday: “The refugees are being fed one meal a day. Most are from the northern Aleppo towns of Tell Rifaat and Mara and from IS-controlled towns such as Al-Bab.

    "I saw no mattresses or blankets being distributed. There is no running water, no heat, and the conditions are very bad and squalid. The refugees are very disoriented. Most came with just the clothes on their back. A medic with the Syrian charity the Independent Doctors Association told me he and his colleagues had treated 183 sick people, mainly suffering diarrhea, vomiting and fever."

    An engineer from Tell Rifaat told VOA’s translator the bombing raids were very intense and he saw five Russian warplanes overhead. He said hundreds were fleeing the town. The translator also saw a 3-year-old transferred across the border into Turkey suffering major head and neck wounds.

    You May Like

    Hope Remains for Rio Olympic Games, Despite Woes

    Facing a host of problems, Rio prepares for holding the games but experts say some risks, like Zika, may not be as grave as initially thought

    IS Use of Social Media to Recruit, Radicalize Still a Top Threat to US

    Despite military gains against IS in Iraq and Syria, their internet propaganda still commands an audience; US officials see 'the most complex challenge that the federal government and industry face'

    ‘Time Is Now’ to Save Africa’s Animals From Poachers, Activist Says

    During Zimbabwe visit, African Wildlife Foundation President Kaddu Sebunya says poaching hurts Africa as slave trade once did

    This forum has been closed.
    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Realist
    February 10, 2016 4:56 AM
    Most people were died by Esad who is a dictator murder.
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    February 10, 2016 7:09 AM
    Most people died because someone wanted to kill Assad and take his place.

    by: AHMED from: INDIA
    February 09, 2016 11:57 AM
    Thanks to Russia for helping Syria. Russia is better than Muslims countries who sponsored Terrorist to kill 350,000/= and same numbers become homeless.
    Saudi Arabia is number one in the whole world who is sponsoring Terrorist organisation in the world to create MESS in Muslim countries. Few examples are Al Qaida, Taliban, Daesh, Nusrat front, Booko haram and IS.

    We have so many hungry Muslims who do not have money to feed Three times in comfortable manner and no clean drinking water. SA suppose to solve their problems but they feel much pleasure to see endless tears in their eyes. Very shameful act for which they will be accountable in front of GOD ON DAY OF JUDGEMENT. Saudi Arabia have no answer for killing of so many Muslims in the name of Poor Islam.

    by: meanbill from: USA
    February 09, 2016 11:18 AM
    To escape the Russian and Syrian army blitzkrieg attack, all the terrorists will say they are moderate rebels if that's what it takes to survive? .. The Russians and Syrian army only identifies those Syrians (that don't take up arms against the Syrian government) and only want to negotiate at the table for a peaceful end to the Syrian war, [and], those that want to have the Syrian people vote and decide who will be president and what type government they would vote for as moderate rebels? .. And the Russians and Syrian army recognizes any group that's representing or collaborating with foreign governments as terrorists? .. Simple, isn't it? .. As for the dead rebels or terrorists, let Allah sort them out? .. as it should be?

    by: annymous from: usa
    February 09, 2016 11:08 AM
    good news and congratulation s to Syrian Gov. the moderate rebel are behind the genocide in Syria and they have to get the taste . they are not deserve any sympathy. they initiated a civil war that causes of creating isis and the genocide of Christian.

    Featured Videos

    Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
    Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolatei
    X
    July 29, 2016 4:02 PM
    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Ivorian Chocolate Makers Promote Locally-made Chocolate

    Ivory Coast is the world's top producer of cocoa but hardly any of it is processed into chocolate there. Instead, the cocoa is sent abroad to chocolate makers in Europe and elsewhere. This is a general problem throughout Africa – massive exports of raw materials but few finished goods. As Emilie Iob reports from Abidjan, several Ivorian entrepreneurs are working to change that formula - 100 percent Ivorian chocolate bar at a time.
    Video

    Video Tesla Opens Battery-Producing Gigafactory

    Two years after starting to produce electric cars, U.S. car maker Tesla Motors has opened the first part of its huge battery manufacturing plant, which will eventually cover more than a square kilometer. Situated close to Reno, Nevada, the so-called Gigafactory will eventually produce more lithium-ion batteries than were made worldwide in 2013. VOA's George Putic reports.
    Video

    Video Polio-affected Afghan Student Fulfilling Her Dreams in America

    Afghanistan is one of only two countries in the world where children still get infected by polio. The other is Pakistan. Mahbooba Akhtarzada who is from Afghanistan, was disabled by polio, but has managed to overcome the obstacles caused by this crippling disease. VOA's Zheela Nasari caught up with Akhtarzada and brings us this report narrated by Bronwyn Benito.
    Video

    Video Hillary Clinton Promises to Build a 'Better Tomorrow'

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton urged voters Thursday not to give in to the politics of fear. She vowed to unite the country and move it forward if elected in November. Clinton formally accepted the Democratic Party's nomination at its national convention in Philadelphia. VOA national correspondent Jim Malone has more.
    Video

    Video Trump Tones Down Praise for Russia

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is toning down his compliments for Russia and Vladimir Putin as such rhetoric got him in trouble recently. After calling on Russia to find 30.000 missing emails from rival Hillary Clinton, Trump told reporters he doesn't know Putin and never called him a great leader, just one who's better than President Barack Obama. Putin has welcomed Trump's overtures, but, as Zlatica Hoke reports, ordinary Russians say they are not putting much faith in Trump.
    Video

    Video Uganda Unveils its First Solar-powered Bus

    A solar-powered bus described by its Ugandan makers as the first in Africa has made its public debut. Kiira Motors' electric bus, Kayoola, displayed recently at a stadium in Uganda's capital. From Kampala, Maurice Magorane filed this report narrated by Salem Solomon.
    Video

    Video Silicon Valley: More Than A Place, It's a Culture

    Silicon Valley is a technology powerhouse and a place that companies such as Google, Facebook and Apple call home. It is a region in northern California that stretches from San Francisco to San Jose. But, more than that, it's known for its startup culture. VOA's Elizabeth Lee went inside one company to find out what it's like to work in a startup.
    Video

    Video Immigrant Delegate Marvels at Democratic Process

    It’s been a bitter and divisive election season – but first time Indian-American delegate Dr. Shashi Gupta headed to the Democratic National Convention with a sense of hope. VOA’s Katherine Gypson followed this immigrant with the love of U.S. politics all the way to Philadelphia.
    Video

    Video Dutch Entrepreneurs Turn Rainwater Into Beer

    June has been recorded as one of the wettest months in more than a century in many parts of Europe. To a group of entrepreneurs in Amsterdam the rain came as a blessing, as they used the extra water to brew beer. Serginho Roosblad has more to the story.
    Video

    Video Commerce Thrives on US-Mexico Border

    At the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia this week, the party’s presumptive presidential nominee, Hillary Clinton, is expected to attack proposals made by her opponent, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Last Friday, President Barack Obama hosted his Mexican counterpart, President Enrique Peña Nieto, to underscore the good relations between the two countries. VOA’s Greg Flakus reports from Tucson.
    Video

    Video Film Helps Save Ethiopian Children Thought to be Cursed

    'Omo Child' looks at effort of African man to stop killings of ‘mingi’ children
    Video

    Video London’s Financial Crown at Risk as Rivals Eye Brexit Opportunities

    By most measures, London rivals New York as the only true global financial center. But Britain’s vote to leave the European Union – so-called ‘Brexit’ – means the city could lose its right to sell services tariff-free across the bloc, risking its position as Europe’s financial headquarters. Already some banks have said they may shift operations to the mainland. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.

    Special Report

    Adrift The Invisible African Diaspora