News / Middle East

Syrian Rebels Attack Aleppo Security Compounds

Free Syrian Army fighters run for cover after Syrian forces fired a mortar in the El Amreeyeh neighborhood of Syria's northwestern city of Aleppo August 30, 2012.
Free Syrian Army fighters run for cover after Syrian forces fired a mortar in the El Amreeyeh neighborhood of Syria's northwestern city of Aleppo August 30, 2012.
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VOA News
Activists say Syrian rebel fighters have attacked several security compounds in the northern city of Aleppo as clashes continued in other areas of the war-torn country.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said Friday that one of the assaults in Aleppo sparked a firefight that killed and wounded a number of government troops. It gave no figures.

Last month, rebel forces  took control of parts of Syria's commercial hub, sparking fierce fighting there.

Also Friday, the monitoring group said government troops and rebels were locked in battle north of the capital, Damascus, and in Albu Kamal, on the Iraqi border. Internet video appeared to show fighting in Homs, Daraa and Damascus.

The UNHCR says more Syrians are fleeing as violence increases. Most are heading to the following countries:

  • Jordan: 150,000 refugees
  • Turkey: 70,000 refugees
  • Lebanon: More than 35,000 refugees
  • Iraq: 12,000 registered refugees
  • Algeria: 10-25,000 refugees

source: UNHCR
On Thursday, Syria's neighbors - seeking to assist more than 200,000 war refugees - asked the United Nations Security Council for urgent help in coping with the growing humanitarian crisis.

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu told the 15-nation council his government has already spent more than $300 million to build 11 refugee camps. He said Turkey, already home to 80,000 Syrian refugees, can only handle 20,000 more.

Davutoglu also cited data showing 2 million displaced people inside Syria. He urged the world body to establish a buffer zone that guarantees protection for those forced to flee the carnage.

Jordanian Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh also pleaded for help, telling the council his country has limited means to deal with the more than 70,000 refugees inside its borders.

Meanwhile, Human Rights Watch said Thursday Syrian jets and artillery have struck at least 10 bakeries in Aleppo in the last three weeks, killing dozens of people as they waited in line to buy bread. HRW is accusing the military of targeting civilians.

The U.S.-based group said the attacks were either aimed or were executed without care to avoid the hundreds of civilians forced to stand outside a dwindling number of bakeries in Syria's biggest city, a front line in the civil war.

Some information for this report provided by AP and AFP.

Timeline of Syrian Unrest
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Comments
     
by: Michael from: USA
September 02, 2012 8:55 AM
One thing is certain, the world has torn to shreds God's Spiritual Family. It's not enough for conflict within the borders of Syria, but the conflict is disturbing world peace


by: Carlos .. from: USA
August 31, 2012 2:45 PM
The cowardice of President Obama is repugnant to his own stated principles which he so eloquently espoused March 28, 2011, "when people were being brutalized in Bosnia in the 1990s, it took the international community more than a year to intervene with air power to protect civilians." www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and-video/video/2011/03/28/president-obama-s-speech-libya

“To brush aside America’s responsibility as a leader and — more profoundly — our responsibilities to our fellow human beings under such circumstances would have been a betrayal of who we are,” (Except in an election year?)

“Some nations may be able to turn a blind eye to atrocities in other countries. The United States of America is different,” (Except in an election year)

“And as president, I refused to wait for the images of slaughter and mass graves before taking action.”

In Response

by: Plain Mirror from: Abidjan
September 01, 2012 10:54 AM
Whenever I read or come across the falacy called protecting of civilians, I feel ashamed of the world especially the US and France. Here in Ivory coast, I repeat, can Obama and his men tell the world the truth of how many innocent citizens of Ivory coast that were killed last year by UN and France Helicopters? I am an eye witness, I survived by His grace. France and UN transported rebels across the country, killed and massacred innocent Ivorianes. UN camp was less than a kilometer from Doukue village of Ivory coast yet they were unable to protect the civilians who were killed and burnt by Alassane Ouattara rebels. They kept mute simply because their loyalist committed the crimes. The pictures to these very wicked acts show that US, France and UN are hipocrites. Does the US ever protected civilians in countries where their loyalists are in power? make your research. Absolutely not! What happened in Ivory coast was a US, UN-France bloody politics. Please, please, I repeat please, withdraw that hipocritical statement. We are no longer fools!! The recent past wickedness opened broadly the ass of the so called western powers and their supporters and that is what the Syria people are suffering now. The Mirror is simply plain in this comment and May The will of God Almighty prevail.

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