News / Middle East

Syrian Troops Kill 7 in Coastal Area

Image from amateur video purports to show body of man killed by Syrian regime forces in Idlib, June 5, 2012.
Image from amateur video purports to show body of man killed by Syrian regime forces in Idlib, June 5, 2012.
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A Syrian rights group says government troops have killed at least seven people in a second day of fighting with rebels in a previously calm coastal region where no U.N. observers have been deployed.

The London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said military helicopters and tanks opened fire on several towns in the northwestern province of Latakia on Wednesday. It said the dead include several civilians and at least one rebel.

Fighting across Syria on Tuesday killed more than 30 people, many of them in Latakia, the Observatory said. The casualties could not be independently confirmed.

Damascus-based U.N. spokeswoman Sausan Ghosheh said that the U.N. observer mission in Syria does not have any observers in Latakia. She said the U.N. confirmed clashes in the area by speaking to representatives of both sides and will not send unarmed observers into harm's way.

But Ghosheh said the mission plans to set up a base in the southwestern coastal city of Tartus by the end of the week and send a patrol to Latakia as soon as possible.

Free Syrian Army rebels appear to have intensified attacks on security forces in recent days after some rebel commanders declared they will no longer be bound by a U.N.-backed truce agreement because of repeated government violations. Damascus denies violating the cease-fire and blames the rebels for continued fighting.

Lebanese security officials said Wednesday Syrian troops have shot and killed a Lebanese man and wounded two others in a gun battle along the two nations' poorly-demarcated border. They said the fighting erupted near the Lebanese town of Arsal as a small group of Lebanese were trying to cross into Syria through an area known as a smuggling route.

Several shootings have happened on the Lebanon-Syria border since the start of a 15-month uprising against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, raising concerns that Syria's conflict may spread to its smaller neighbor.

As violence continues, Assad appointed the agriculture minister from his outgoing Cabinet as the country's new prime minister on Wednesday, in the latest step of what the president has called a political reform process.

State media said prime minister-designate Riad Farid Hijab will form Syria's next government.

The Assad government held a parliamentary election on May 7. But Syrian opposition activists said few people voted in the country's rebellious towns and villages.

In a meeting in China on Wednesday, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said nations exerting influence over Syrian opposition groups should join an international gathering to rescue the faltering cease-fire deal brokered by U.N.-Arab League joint envoy Kofi Annan.

Russia is a longtime ally of the Assad government and has blamed his opponents for much of Syria's violence.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was headed to Istanbul Wednesday to discuss the Syrian conflict with her counterparts from other nations demanding Assad leave office, including Turkey, Britain, France, and several Arab states.

Some information for this report was provided by AP, AFP and Reuters.

Michael Lipin

Michael covers international news for VOA on the web, radio and TV, specializing in the Middle East and East Asia Pacific. Follow him on Twitter @Michael_Lipin

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by: Anonymous from: America
June 06, 2012 6:17 PM
The Assad Gangster Regime represents pure evil. Kofi Annan’s plan is a total absolute failure. The world must realize that you cannot negotiate with the devil. The only way to end the suffering and misery of the Syrian people is the use of force to completely eliminate Assad, the Shabiha and the Ba’ath Party from Syria forever. When a Regime is so wicked that they will kill children and babies in broad daylight, they are letting you know that human life means nothing to them. A total air and naval blockade must be imposed on Syria immediately. Assad must be notified to leave Syria now or face the consequences.


by: ADEL ALSHEAR from: OSLO NORWAY
June 06, 2012 3:39 PM
THIS IS TIME NOW HAVE COME WITH NO MISSION DIPLOMATIC REPABULIC TURKEY . THIS IS NOW TIME HAVE COMWITHOUT MISSION DIPLOMATIC REPABULIC TURKEY IN SYRIA IN BY NOW TIME .


by: Michael from: USA
June 06, 2012 9:22 AM
A single political party would make organizing the government more consistent, but the government's organization exerts influence on reform, so that it remains a 'closed' system


by: John
June 06, 2012 7:31 AM
Must admit I still feel that this war is the business of the Syrian people and all others, especially the West, should keep out.

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