News / Asia

Tainted Food Scandal Grows in China

FILE - A Chinese man poses for photos with Ronald McDonald, the mascot for fast food restaurant McDonald's, outside one of its branch at a train station in Shenyang in northern China's Liaoning province.
FILE - A Chinese man poses for photos with Ronald McDonald, the mascot for fast food restaurant McDonald's, outside one of its branch at a train station in Shenyang in northern China's Liaoning province.
VOA News

A toxic food scandal in China is spreading fast, dragging in U.S. coffee chain Starbucks, Burger King Worldwide Inc. and others, as well as products of McDonald's Corp. as far away as Japan.

McDonald's and KFC's parent Yum Brands Inc. apologized to Chinese customers on Monday after it emerged that Shanghai Husi Food Co Ltd., a unit of U.S.-based OSI Group LLC, had supplied expired meat to the two chains.

On Tuesday, Starbucks said some of its stores previously sold products containing chicken originally sourced from Shanghai Husi, a firm that was shut down on Sunday by local regulators after a TV report showed staff using expired meat and picking up meat from the floor to add to the mix.

McDonald's said meat from the supplier had been sold to its branches in Japan where it was used in the firm's McNuggets.

Removing products

Fast-food chain Burger King and Dicos, China's third-ranked diner owned by Ting Hsin International, said they would remove Shanghai Husi food products from their outlets.

Pizza chain Papa John's International Inc said on its Weibo blog that it had taken down all meat products supplied by Shanghai Husi and cut ties with the supplier.

China's food safety agency on Tuesday announced a nationwide inspection of processing factories and meat suppliers used by Shanghai Husi.

In addition to Husi's facility in Shanghai, inspectors will look at processing sites and meat sources in five other provinces in central, eastern and southern China, the China Food and Drug Administration announced.

On Monday, the agency said it sealed Husi's plant in Shanghai and told customers to hold suspect products for testing.

Food safety is one of the top issues for Chinese consumers after a scandal in 2008 where dairy products tainted with the industrial chemical melamine led to the deaths of six infants and made many thousands sick.

Other food scandals have hit the meat and dairy industries in recent years, and many Chinese look to foreign brands as offering higher safety standards.

Starbucks said on its Chinese microblog site that it had no direct business relationship with Shanghai Husi, but that some of its chicken acquired from another supplier had originally come from Shanghai Husi for its “Chicken Apple Sauce Panini” products.

This had been sold in 13 different provinces and major cities.

Starbucks added that all the products had already been removed from the shelves.

Television report

A weekend report by a Shanghai TV station that Shanghai Husi Food Co. repackaged old meat added to a string of food safety scares in China that have left the public wary of dairies, restaurants and other suppliers.

Dragon TV reported Sunday that Shanghai Husi, owned by OSI Group of Aurora, Illinois, repackaged old beef and chicken and put new expiration dates on them. It said they were sold to McDonald's, KFC and Pizza Hut restaurants.

In a statement, Husi said it was "appalled by the report" and would cooperate with the investigation. It promised to share the results with the public.

McDonald's, KFC and a third restaurant chain, Taiwanese-owned Dicos, said they immediately stopped using meat supplied by Shanghai Husi.

The scare has stirred local consumers and become one of the most discussed topics online by the country's influential "netizens," with some users writing and spreading long lists of firms thought to be tarnished.

The incident highlights the difficulty in ensuring quality and safety along the supply chain in China. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. came under the spotlight this year after a supplier's donkey meat product was found to contain fox meat. It also came under fire for selling expired duck meat in 2011.

Burger King said in a Weibo statement posted late on Monday that it had taken off its shelves all meat products supplied by Shanghai Husi Food and had launched an investigation.

Suspect ham products

Dicos said it pulled all ham products supplied by Shanghai Husi, and would stop serving its ham sandwich product for breakfast.

“We will continue to carry out a probe into Shanghai Husi Food and its related firms, to understand whether or not it followed national regulations,” Dicos said in a statement.

IKEA said on Weibo that Shanghai Husi had previously been a supplier, but had not provided the firm with products since September last year. Domino's Pizza Inc. and Doctor's Associates Inc.'s Subway brand, which were named in online reports as being supplied meat from Shanghai Husi, said their outlets in China did not use meat products from the firm.

Yoshinoya-parent Hop Hing Group Holdings Ltd., Japanese convenience store FamilyMart Co Ltd. and Chinese chain Wallace urged diners not to worry, and said they did not currently use any products from Shanghai Husi.

Yum's KFC is China's biggest restaurant chain, with more than 4,000 outlets and plans to open 700 more this year.

The company, based in Louisville, Kentucky, said in a statement that "food safety is the most important priority for us. We will not tolerate any violations of government laws and regulations from our suppliers."

Some information for this report provided by Reuters and AP.

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Ian from: USA
July 22, 2014 11:06 AM
some ( I can not say all because I did not shop at all of the places) of the Chinese supermarkets in the state that I live do practice switching expire labels or provide no expiration dates (a very childish mentality of penny wise) because sooner or later one can lose the customers I found that the Korean or Japanese stores are tip top in cleanliness and being honest of the freshness of their food .

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