News / Africa

Taylor Sentence Sparks Justice Debate in Liberia

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor listens to the judge at the opening of the sentencing judgement hearing at the court in Leidschendam, near The Hague, May 30, 2012. Former Liberian President Charles Taylor listens to the judge at the opening of the sentencing judgement hearing at the court in Leidschendam, near The Hague, May 30, 2012.
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Former Liberian President Charles Taylor listens to the judge at the opening of the sentencing judgement hearing at the court in Leidschendam, near The Hague, May 30, 2012.
Former Liberian President Charles Taylor listens to the judge at the opening of the sentencing judgement hearing at the court in Leidschendam, near The Hague, May 30, 2012.
Kate Thomas
DAKAR - The sentencing of former Liberian president Charles Taylor on Wednesday was heralded as an historic moment for Sierra Leone. But in neighboring Liberia, many say the justice and reconciliation process is only just beginning.  As Taylor was handed a 50-year jail term, Liberian rights groups and activists were debating whether Taylor's allies and rivals should also be subject to international justice.  

The sentencing of Charles Taylor for war crimes committed during Sierra Leone's conflict has sparked debate in the former leader's native Liberia.

Many Liberians did not follow the trial proceedings, believing that it was more relevant for Sierra Leoneans.

But others gathered around radios Wednesday as news of Taylor's 50-year jail term was read out.

The matter has sparked calls for other Liberians suspected of war crimes to be handed over to international courts.  Liberia's media have run editorials and held radio debates on the advantages and disadvantages of the idea.

Larry Tengbeh, who lives in Monrovia, is among those who think Taylor should not be the only one held responsible for war crimes. "There are a number of them roaming around in Liberia.  They need to face justice," he said.

He's talking about former rivals, and in some cases, allies of Taylor during Liberia's civil conflict, which ended in 2003, a year after Sierra Leone's.

At least five members of Taylor's wartime inner circle are still under U.N.-imposed travel bans and subject to economic sanctions.

Others had recommendations made against them by Liberia's Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

But those recommendations, including one that President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf should be barred from public office for funding Taylor's pre-war rebellion in Liberia, have never been implemented.

There have been calls for Prince Johnson, Taylor's former rival who came in third in last year's presidential race, to be pursued for crimes against humanity.

In 1990, Johnson was videotaped drinking from a bottle of beer while soldiers loyal to him tortured the late President Samuel Doe.

"Other warlords like Prince Johnson who led another rebel group in Liberia, face the full weight of justice too.  He must have his day in court for the killing of former President Samuel Kanyon Doe," said Tengbeh.

But Marpue Tarnue, a 35-year-old housewife, said the issue of pursuing justice should be put to rest.

"I think the people of Sierra Leone got the justice they had been looking for.  The trial is over and it is time for the two countries to put the past behind them and move forward," she said.

Some feel that during Liberia's conflict, which left 300,000 people dead, many people came away with dirty hands.

They say that everyone became a part of the system of war, and that holding individuals responsible will prevent Liberia as a whole from moving beyond the conflict.

Nobel laureate Leymah Gbowee is currently leading a reconciliation initiative in Liberia, backed by President Johnson-Sirleaf. But Liberians say the process, which focuses mostly on discussion, has been slow to get off the ground.

Teddey Morris, who has been following the trial, asks how Liberian reconciliation should be defined.

"Reconciliation is about forgiving and forgetting the past.  A sentence of 50 years is not what you call reconciliation," he said.

In 2008, Liberian novelist Elma Shaw published a book called "Redemption Road."

It told the story of a Liberian girl, Bendu, who was abducted during the war and forced to marry a rebel fighter at a camp in the forest.  It is a story that speaks to thousands of Liberian women who had similar experiences.

After the war, Bendu reflects on her time in the forest.

"For Bendu, forgetting was out of the question," Shaw writes, "but remembering and doing nothing about it was even worse."

The question, for Liberians, is just what should be done.

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by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
June 13, 2012 1:04 AM
Why it is the war court cannot prosecute Russian president or syrian president?what about north korean president?until Africa be able to stand on their own and need no voice from the west we will always be behind.We cannot acess unless there be intervention from the west.we are not capable to solve own problem?this is a shame,and it is what it is.why the rest of the rebels that were fighting in Liberia were not prosecuted?Ellen Jonhson Sirleaf,Prince Jonhson,George Borley etc,etc for killing the Liberian people?this is nonsense


by: P. Dindas from: London
June 01, 2012 9:53 AM
Dictators who put the law into their hands must dance the music. Why live Robert Mugabe who did ethnic clensing with the North Koreans between 1983- 87 in the Midlands and Matebeleland and all is documented by the Catholic Peace and Justice.
During the 2008 Presidential Election his Defence Minister M'nangagwa conducted with the state machinery a mass killing of MDC SUPPORTERS.
Just as the UN EMMISSARY WAS PACKING HER BAGS NIVI PILLAY, a well respected uncle Magura had his life terminated under state police supervision.
WHEN WILL THE UN, EU,AU AND SADC PROTECT DEFENCELESS ZIMBABWEANS? Where will this lead the country to? Does the International await to resolve acrisis management?
Please stop the murderers who continue to violate Human Rights with impunity


by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City,NJ
June 01, 2012 1:41 AM
This is an in justice to the Liberian people,first of all Charles Taylor did not carry war into sierra leone,it was late Fody Sankor and the rest of RUF rebels that took war into Liberia along with Mr.Taylor.at that time,in 1990 the Liberian people was running away from Liberia,what was Fody Sankor and RUF doing in Liberia?they were fighting along side with Mr.Taylor killing the Liberian people.The people of sierra leone took war to our country.that is the true.so this is non sense.

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