News / Middle East

Egypt's Mansour Retracts ElBaradei Claims

Mohamed ElBaradei, former head of the U.N. nuclear watchdog and Nobel laureate, Cairo, Jan. 2012 file photo.
Mohamed ElBaradei, former head of the U.N. nuclear watchdog and Nobel laureate, Cairo, Jan. 2012 file photo.
VOA News
Egypt's new president appears to be backing away from an announcement that pro-reform leader Mohamed ElBaradei would be made interim prime minister.
 
A spokesman for interim President Adly Mansour told reporters on Saturday that consultations were continuing, denying that the appointment of the Nobel Peace laureate was ever certain.
 
He mentioned no other candidates but said there was no set date for the appointment of interim prime minister.
 
Earlier Saturday, opposition officials said ElBaradei was summoned by Mansour and would be sworn in later in the day as interim prime minister.
 
Already, a senior Muslim Brotherhood spokesman has told Reuters the group rejects ElBaradei's appointment as prime minister and Brotherhood supporters have vowed to continue their protests until former president Mohamed Morsi — Egypt's first democratically elected president — is returned to power.
 
Egypt's military arrested Morsi and other leaders of the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood Wednesday, saying the actions were necessary to prevent a mass uprising. Clashes between Morsi's supporters and opponents erupted Friday in Cairo and across the country, leaving 36 people dead and more than 1,000 people injured.

Story continues below photo gallery 
  • A military attack helicopter flies near the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, July 5, 2013.
  • Supporters of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi carry an injured man during clashes outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • Supporters and opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohamed Morsi clash in Cairo, July 5, 2013. Tens of thousands of Islamists streamed across a Nile River bridge toward Tahrir Square, threatening a showdown moments after the top leader of the Muslim Brotherhood defiantly spoke before a cheering crowd of supporters, vowing to reinstate the ousted president and end military rule.
  • Islamist protesters, one holding a picture of ousted president Mohamed Morsi, hold up blood-stained hands after troops opened fire on a protest in front of the Republican Guard headquarters in Nasr City, Cairo, July 5, 2013
  • Opponents of Egypt's Islamist ousted president Mohamed Morsi wave national flags as they celebrate in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, July 5, 2013
  • Protesters who support former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi gather around the body of a man during clashes outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo, July 5, 2013.
  • A protester, who supports former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, chants slogans during a rally near Cairo University after Friday prayers in Cairo, July 5, 2013.
  • Security forces watch over supporters of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi during clashes outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo, July 5, 2013.
  • A protester who supports former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi offers flowers to military personnel during clashes outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo, July 5, 2013.
  • Supporters of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi gather around the covered body of a victim of clashes outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo, July 5, 2013. 
  • Supports of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi run during demonstrations outside the Republican Guard building in Cairo July 5, 2013. 
  • A protester, who supports former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi, holds up a copy of the Koran as she and others march near Cairo University after Friday prayers in Cairo, July 5, 2013.
  • Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi react to an explosion of unknown origin and throw stones at police officers nearby, during a protest in Cairo University, Giza, Egypt, July 5, 2013.
  • A supporter of ousted Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi cries during a protest near the University of Cairo, Giza, Egypt, Friday, July 5, 2013. Arabic reads, "Yes for the legitimacy." Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood called for a wave of protests Friday, furious over the military's ouster of its president and arrest of its revered leader and other top figures, raising fears of violence and retaliation from Islamic militants.
  • Opponents of Egypt's ousted president Mohamed Morsi wave national flags and posters showing Lt. Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi in Tahrir Square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, July 5, 2013. Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood called for a wave of protests Friday, furious o

In Washington, President Barack Obama expressed concern over the country's continuing political polarization. He reiterated that the United States is not aligned with, and does not support, any particular Egyptian political party or group.
 
Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been continuing their massive sit-in protest in Cairo's Nasr City, thousands turning out on Saturday to call for Morsi's return.
 
Many also gathered at the Salaheddine Mosque to mourn five Morsi supporters killed in Friday's violence. Ibrahim Abdeen was one of them.
 
"These martyrs were killed because the government, the army and the police were careless in protecting their people," said Abdeen. "They were late in saving them, it took more than two hours to respond. They were waiting for the clashes to happen between the Muslim Brotherhood, Abu Ismail group, those who are against Egypt and the people."
 
Mansour meets with Army chief

The interim president, jurist Adly Mansour, met at the presidential palace Saturday with the country's army chief, General Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, and the interior minister, who heads the national police. The Associated Press reports Mansour also met with leaders of the Tamrod youth movement, which has been organizing anti-Morsi rallies.
 
Meanwhile, a new group that emerged Friday says it will take violent action if necessary to win the ousted president's reinstatement.
 
The previously unknown group, Ansar al-Shariah, announced its formation with a lengthy statement declaring it does not support "democratic legitimacy" — the Muslim Brotherhood's contention that Morsi was freely elected and should remain in office. It said establishment of Islamic sharia law in Egypt is its primary goal.
 
Fears of increased sectarian violence rose again Saturday after the killing of a Coptic priest in the northern Sinai. Egyptian security officials said gunmen dragged the priest from his car and shot him repeatedly.
 
Officials also reported attacks by Islamist militants at several security checkpoints in the region.
 
After arresting Morsi on Wednesday, the military suspended the constitution and ordered new elections. The army says its action was prompted by the risk of a mass uprising against Morsi's policies and leadership. Opponents accused the nation's first democratically elected president of betraying the 2011 revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak.
 
The military and Egypt's former opposition groups have called for reconciliation as the military moves forward with its so-called road map to restore democratic civilian rule. As the violence raged Friday, the United States and the United Nations urged Egyptians to reach a peaceful end to the crisis and avoid violence.

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Comments
     
by: harishchandrasharma from: india
July 07, 2013 10:05 AM
sir, i heard news regarding devlopment in Egypt and it is regretful that an elected govt has been throwned out it proves that egyptians have commited mistake in electing their leaders for which they r facing troubles.now it seems necassory to restore the democratic govt or a fresh mandate should be held.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
July 07, 2013 9:37 AM
It's just good and necessary to make sure that anyone placed in that post should have a liberal mind and not one like the Muslim Brother or any of its sister fundamentalist islamist groups. Mohamed ElBaradei or whoever should be as important as the demand for a free democratic Egypt is to those who staked everything to achieve Morsi ousting. As for the new islamist outfit that wants sharia, it's no new thing out there; they would still have emerged whether there was a Morsi vacuum or not. The world bodies like the UN, AU and Arab League should be prepared to support the current leadership in Egypt to navigate Egypt to safe harbor. Any further derailment will be disastrous.


by: Ahmed from: Egypt - Cairo
July 07, 2013 5:52 AM
Good Morning Dears,
Just wanted say and to recommend that this newspaper correspondents to explore the accuracy of their news and show all the facts and do not drew the attention to only one party.
What about the agreement with Khayrat Alshater estimated at $ 800 million concerning Sinai. !!!!!!!

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