News / Africa

Tension in South Africa’s ‘Mother City’ Ahead of Local Government Polls

Divided Cape Town set for one of the most significant municipal elections

Darren Taylor

This is Part 3 of a 5-part series: Municipal Elections in South Africa
Parts 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5

Cape Town, on South Africa’s West Coast, is universally praised as one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The famous landmark of Table Mountain looms over the metropolis, an emerald green peninsula sliding into the Atlantic Ocean, the city divided into colorful old suburbs, ancient castles, public gardens, vineyards and pristine beaches.

Political analysts say the battle for Cape Town, one of the world’s most beautiful cities, will arguably be the most intriguing contest in the upcoming local government elections in South Africa
Political analysts say the battle for Cape Town, one of the world’s most beautiful cities, will arguably be the most intriguing contest in the upcoming local government elections in South Africa


But political analysts say there’ll be nothing pretty about the fight between the ruling African National Congress [ANC] and the main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance [DA], for control of Cape Town in local government elections on May 18.

In the previous municipal polls in 2006, the DA defeated the ANC in the “Mother City” – so called because in the 1600s it was the first town to be established in South Africa. The ANC dominates politics in the rest of the country, but ever since the nation’s first democratic elections in 1994 it has struggled for votes in the Western Cape.

ANC claims credit for advances in Cape Town


According to the DA, when it took over management of Cape Town five years ago, the city was “in decline” as a result of ANC “mismanagement.” The DA says the ANC council had spent only 60 percent of its budget, revenue collection had “collapsed” and essential services such as policing and health were “understaffed and inadequately equipped.”

In Cape Town, it’s a shootout between the main opposition party, the DA, and the ANC, for control of South Africa’s tourism hub
In Cape Town, it’s a shootout between the main opposition party, the DA, and the ANC, for control of South Africa’s tourism hub


The DA says its “progressive” policies corrected all of this, to the extent that Cape Town is today recognized by several independent local government monitors as the most efficient city in South Africa.

But ANC city councilor Xolani Sotashe insisted that the improvements are the result of ANC programs that the DA took over and implemented from 2006 until now. “The programs that they are actually boasting about today are the programs that are coming all the way from the ANC administration,” he said.

The DA said it’s delivered tens of thousands of houses in Cape Town townships over the past few years. Sotashe responded, “I can tell you right now the DA has not delivered a single house. All the housing deliveries they are talking about now were planned… by the ANC government.”

Tension in South Africa’s ‘Mother City’ Ahead of Local Government Polls
Tension in South Africa’s ‘Mother City’ Ahead of Local Government Polls


But Cherrel Africa, local government expert at the University of the Western Cape, said the DA has undoubtedly “made some advances and there are certain aspects where they’ve shown they are more efficient than the ANC.” She did, however, agree with Sotashe that often the DA is “picking up on preexisting programs [initiated by the ANC government].”

The ANC councilor said another reason for the DA’s good performance in Cape Town is support from the national ANC government. “The DA city council is using billions of rands of national government money for development. Then at the end of the day they go and lie to people and say that as the DA in the city of Cape Town, this is what they are doing for the people,” he said.

The DA insists that it has funded most improvements in Cape Town from its own funds, and that while it has used some national money for certain projects, it argues that these still require good management – something that it says was “missing” under the previous ANC municipality.

DA ‘doesn’t care about the poor’


The DA says it’s spent more than 450 million rands [US$ 67 million] on upgrading the impoverished black township of Khayelitsha, but Sotashe said the DA “represents the white minority’s views” in Cape Town and is “racist.”

Under the leadership of Helen Zille, the DA says Cape Town has thrived, with some independent local government monitors declaring the city to be top in South Africa at service delivery
Under the leadership of Helen Zille, the DA says Cape Town has thrived, with some independent local government monitors declaring the city to be top in South Africa at service delivery


Africa said the DA in the city has made two “glaring mistakes” that have opened it up to such accusations. First, it built unenclosed toilets for the black residents of Makhaza district; and second, it evicted scores of black squatters from an area near the affluent and mostly white suburb of Hout Bay. She said the DA managed these incidents “very badly,” although there’s still a “reservoir of positive sentiment” surrounding the DA in Cape Town.

The local government expert said the ANC’s labeling of the DA as racist and using that as part of its campaign strategy is “really problematic, because I think voting patterns in the Western Cape [are] not best explained by the racial motivations of voters.”

Africa is convinced the polls are about whether or not a particular party will be able to provide citizens with quality municipal services, such as good housing and clean water. “For the ordinary voter it’s about those issues, it’s about service delivery; it’s about the issues that affect people’s lives.”

But other observers insist that race will play a big part in the battle for Cape Town. The Western Cape province, where Cape Town is the largest city, is home to most of South Africa’s four and a half million colored or mixed race people. Certain analysts say whichever party gets the so-called “colored vote” will win the city.

The ANC is confident of snatching the city away from the DA on May 18
The ANC is confident of snatching the city away from the DA on May 18


But Cherrel Africa dismissed the “colored vote” as a “myth.”

She said previous elections in the Western Cape – the only province in South Africa where three different political parties, namely the now defunct and mostly white National Party, the ANC with its black majority support and the racially diverse DA have been in power at different times since 1994 – have shown that most coloreds don’t vote based purely on race.

“Certainly the Western Cape is very, very different. In this province, in elections generally, voters reward and punish parties based on political developments [not based on race],” said Africa.

Contest between colored mayoral candidates


Yet the ANC’s and the DA’s pursuit of colored support is clear in their choice of candidates for mayor. Both parties have selected high-profile colored political leaders – Tony Ehrenreich, the chief of the Congress of South African Trade Unions in the Western Cape in the case of the ANC, and veteran member of parliament Patricia de Lille in the case of the DA.

The DA’s choice for mayor of Cape Town is Member of Parliament Patricia de Lille
The DA’s choice for mayor of Cape Town is Member of Parliament Patricia de Lille

“They’re very, very strong candidates and they’re very good strategic choices from both political parties. So unfortunately it does become a contest between those two,” said Africa.

According to her, both Ehrenreich and de Lille have “mass appeal,” with the ANC candidate – who insists on living in a working class neighborhood and driving an old car – perhaps having a “populist edge.”

“He is a very credible and formidable opponent. The only problem [for the ANC] is that he’s one individual, and voters have observed a lot of division within the ANC provincially. So as an individual, I’m not sure that he’d be able to swing it for the ANC,” said Africa.

The ANC is sure that its candidate, veteran union leader Tony Ehrenreich, will be the next mayor of Cape Town
The ANC is sure that its candidate, veteran union leader Tony Ehrenreich, will be the next mayor of Cape Town

In the build-up to these elections, the ruling party in the Western Cape has been wracked by infighting, with a number of rival ANC groups arguing about leadership positions in the organization.

Africa said this has left “ANC voters in the Western Cape… quite disillusioned” and she suspects that many won’t vote on May 18. She told VOA, “They’re not necessarily switching to the DA, but because they’re opting out (of the polls), it has the effect of boosting the DA’s numbers.”

You May Like

Photogallery Americans Celebrate Thanksgiving With Feasts, Festivities

Holiday traditions include turkey dinners, 'turkey trots,' American-style football and New York parade with giant balloons More

Video For Obama, Ferguson Violence is a Personal Issue

With two years left in term, analysts say, president has less to lose by taking conversation on race further More

Video Italian Espresso Expands Into Space

When Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti headed for the ISS, her countrymen worried how she would survive six months drinking only instant coffee More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
US Community Kicks Off Thanksgiving With Paradei
X
Anush Avetisyan
November 26, 2014 10:57 PM
Thursday is Thanksgiving in the United States, a holiday whose roots go back to the country's earliest days as a British colony. One way Americans celebrate the occasion is with parades. Anush Avetisyan takes us to one such event on the day before Thanksgiving near Washington, where a community's diversity is on display. Joy Wagner narrates
Video

Video US Community Kicks Off Thanksgiving With Parade

Thursday is Thanksgiving in the United States, a holiday whose roots go back to the country's earliest days as a British colony. One way Americans celebrate the occasion is with parades. Anush Avetisyan takes us to one such event on the day before Thanksgiving near Washington, where a community's diversity is on display. Joy Wagner narrates
Video

Video For Obama, Ferguson Violence is a Personal Issue

Throughout the crisis in Ferguson, Missouri, President Barack Obama has urged calm, restraint and respect for the rule of law. But the events in Ferguson have prompted him to call — more openly than he has before — for profound changes to end the racism and distrust that he believes still exists between whites and blacks in the United States. VOA White House correspondent Luis Ramirez reports.
Video

Video Online Magazine Gets Kids Discussing Big Questions

Teen culture in America is often criticized for being superficial. But an online magazine has been encouraging some teenagers to explore deeper issues, and rewarding their efforts. VOA religion reporter Jerome Socolovsky went to this year’s Kidspirit awards ceremony in New York.
Video

Video Aung San Suu Kyi: Myanmar Opposition to Keep Pushing for Constitutional Change

Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she and her supporters will continue pushing to amend a constitutional clause that bars her from running for president next year. VOA's Than Lwin Htun reports from the capital Naypyitaw in this report narrated by Colin Lovett.
Video

Video Mali Attempts to Shut Down Ebola Transmission Chain

Senegal and Nigeria were able to stop small Ebola outbreaks by closely monitoring those who had contact with the sick person and quickly isolating anyone with symptoms. Mali is now scrambling to do the same. VOA’s Anne Look reports from Mali on what the country is doing to shut down the chain of transmission.
Video

Video Ukraine Marks Anniversary of Deadly 1930s Famine

During a commemoration for millions who died of starvation in Ukraine in the early 1930s, President Petro Poroshenko lashed out at Soviet-era totalitarianism for causing the deaths and accused today’s Russian-backed rebels in the east of using similar tactics. VOA’s Daniel Shearf reports from Kyiv.
Video

Video Hong Kong Protests at a Crossroads

New public opinion polls in Hong Kong indicate declining support for pro-democracy demonstrations after weeks of street protests. VOA’s Bill Ide in Guangzhou and Pros Laput in Hong Kong spoke with protesters and observers about whether demonstrators have been too aggressive in pushing for change.
Video

Video US Immigration Relief Imminent for Mixed-Status Families

Tens of thousands of undocumented immigrants in the Washington, D.C., area may benefit from a controversial presidential order announced this week. It's not a path to citizenship, as some activists hoped. But it will allow more immigrants who arrived as children or who have citizen children, to avoid deportation and work legally. VOA's Victoria Macchi talks with one young man who benefited from an earlier presidential order, and whose parents may now benefit after years of living in fear.
Video

Video New Skateboard Defies Gravity

A futuristic dream only a couple of decades ago, the hoverboard – a skateboard that floats above the ground - has finally been made possible. While still not ready for mass production, it promises to become a cool mode of transport... at least over some surfaces. VOA’s George Putic reports.
Video

Video Falling Gas Prices Impact US Oil Extraction

With the price of oil now less than $80 a barrel, motorists throughout the United States are benefiting from gas prices below $3 a gallon. But as VOA’s Kane Farabaugh reports, the decreasing price of petroleum has a downside for the hydraulic fracturing industry in the United States.
Video

Video Tensions Build on Korean Peninsula Amid Military Drills

It has been another tense week on the Korean peninsula as Pyongyang threatened to again test nuclear weapons while the U.S. and South Korean forces held joint military exercises in a show of force. VOA’s Brian Padden reports from the Kunsan Air Base in South Korea.
Video

Video Mama Sarah Obama Honored at UN Women’s Entrepreneurship Day

President Barack Obama's step-grandmother is in the United States to raise money to build a $12 million school and hospital center in Kogelo, Kenya, the birthplace of the president's father, Barack Obama, Sr. She was honored for her decades of work to aid poor Kenyans at a Women's Entrepreneurship Day at the United Nations.
Video

Video Ebola Economic Toll Stirs W. Africa Food Security Concerns

The World Bank said Wednesday that it expects the economic impact of the Ebola outbreak on the sub-Saharan economy to cost somewhere betweenf $3 billion to $4 billion - well below a previously-outlined worst-case scenario of $32 billion. Some economists, however, paint a gloomier picture - warning that the disruption to regional markets and trading is considerable. Henry Ridgwell reports from London.
Video

Video Chaos, Abuse Defy Solution in Libya

The political and security crisis in Libya is deepening, with competing governments and, according to Amnesty International, widespread human rights violations committed with impunity. VOA’s Al Pessin reports from London.
Video

Video US Hosts Record 866,000 Foreign Students

Close to 900,000 international students are studying at American universities and colleges, more than ever before. About half of them come from Asia, mostly China. The United States hosts more foreign students than any other country in the world, and its foreign student population is steadily growing. Zlatica Hoke reports.

All About America

AppleAndroid