News / Europe

Tensions Simmer Over Muslim Veil Incident in Paris Suburb

A woman wearing a full-face veil, or niqab, covers her eyes as she stands near police in Lille, France, in this September 22, 2012, file photo.
A woman wearing a full-face veil, or niqab, covers her eyes as she stands near police in Lille, France, in this September 22, 2012, file photo.
Lisa Bryant
As temperatures soar in France, tensions are also on the rise over Islam, immigration, violence and the state's response to long-simmering tensions in the country's low-income suburbs. It all started with weekend clashes outside the French capital.

Just as French government ministers begin packing their holiday suitcases, violence erupting in the Paris suburb of Trappes suggests they may not be in for a calm summer. Dozens of people assaulted the Trappes police station this past weekend, throwing fireworks and setting trash cans on fire.

The incidents apparently took place after police arrested a man for assaulting them, after they detained his wife for wearing the face-covering veil in public - a practice that is banned in France.

The chain of events sparks memories of previous unrest - first in 2005, when youth riots swept across the country, mostly in immigrant-heavy neighborhoods. In 2010, a new French law banning the face veil also triggered debate and anger.

What's different today, says French sociologist Michel Wieviorka, is the connection between the two issues. Wieviorka is the author of "Evil," a book exploring terrorism, violence and racism.

"There is something which is really new. It is the fact that suddenly two issues that in the recent past were distinct became one and only issue. That is to say, on the one hand, you have many people living in these kinds of poor suburbs that are facing social inequalities, exclusions, racism, police behavior - the classical issue force that explains social riots in the French suburbs, banlieues," said Wieviorka.

The other issue, said Wieviorka, is the ongoing tension over the French face veil ban. Several hundred women have been caught violating the ban since it became law, although not all have faced penalties. In this latest incident, police say the husband of a woman flouting the ban tried to strangle one of their officers. Local Muslim groups dispute that account.

On Monday, a teenager was sentenced to six months in prison in connection with the Trappes clashes. Two other defendants were acquitted. The situation in Trappes remains tense but, for the moment, calm.

France's Interior Minister Manuel Valls has defended the police response.

Interviewed on French radio following the violence, Valls said Trappes residents want order and calm restored  - and that's what's happening. He saluted what he called exemplary work by the police.

Valls also defended the French face veil ban, saying it was not against Islam, but rather was in the interest of women.

But the response by France's leftist government has sparked strong criticism - both for being too tough and not tough enough.

Politicians from the main, center-right UMP opposition party accuse the government of being too lax. Interviewed on France-Info radio Tuesday, former UMP minister Valerie Pecresse criticized the justice system for not cracking down more swiftly and firmly.

What's clear, said sociologist Wieviorka, is that successive governments - both from the left and the right - have failed to alleviate longstanding tensions over immigration and violence. "In front of all these problems at that stage, the only possible answer for the government has been sending in the police, sticking [to] terms of order, in terms of security, respect of the law," Wieviorka stated.

For example, Socialist President Francois Hollande made campaign promises to end racially based identity checks and to introduce legislation giving immigrants the right to vote in local elections. So far, Wieviorka says, neither promise has been fulfilled.

"So there is a strong feeling that if you live in these neighborhoods, if you are an immigrant, you are Muslim, or you are different, you are not taken seriously into account," said Wieviorka.

New reports Tuesday suggest French police are now being probed over racist remarks made on an unofficial police Facebook page at the time of the Trappes violence. France's summer is just beginning. It remains to be seen just how it will end.

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Comments
     
by: Mhee from: Northern Luzon
July 24, 2013 3:02 AM
How about in some part of Middle East why Christian are strictly have to put veil even though its uncomfortable to use it specially during summer.Christian country should respect Muslim culture as Muslim country should also respect Christian culture to be fair.

by: African from: SouthAfrica
July 23, 2013 7:32 PM
a mayor and lawmaker who allegedly told a group of itinerant Roma, parked illegally near his town, that Hitler had not killed enough of them..... franch police arrested a man for,after they detained his wife for wearing the face-covering veil in public - a practice that is banned in France.....looks like EU and their nations are trying and secciding in etnicly clensing their lands from minorities....Jews,Roma,Africans, Arabs, IndoAsians, Muslims,Albanians,Bosniaks,Russians, and others...so sad EU....just like EU did nothing in Balkans wars when Serbs raped,killed, and expeled Milions of Bosniaks and Albanians...now Bosnia is divided and Serb minority rules mijority thru Dayton Accords that build up genocide founded Republika Srpska....so sad for ''democratic'' EU for doing nothing too put down genocide founded Republiks on their lands like Srpska....and they are sayin Africa,South America needs too be more democratic.....EU needs to ''democritize''your own back yard..... and stop supporting etnic cleansing of EU minorities



In Response

by: Slobodan from: USA
July 24, 2013 6:29 PM
Srpska is made up with USA,Russia, France, and UK blessings....and there is no going back even if it is made on genocide, killing, and rape .....Serbia ,EU and USA are the most happy because there is no more 1 million bosniaks(muslims) there....and that is why dayton happened....to bless the us Serbs with a new REPUBLIC of Srpska

by: SAS from: Atlanta
July 23, 2013 6:56 PM
How does insulting women who cover their faces in public by police promote women's rights ?

From what I can tell, France's treatment of its minorities is awful.

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