News / Asia

Tibetan Government in Exile Launches Awareness Campaign

Lobsang Sangay, prime minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile, right, presents a document to spiritual leader the Dalai Lama at the Tibetan Children’s Village School in Dharmsala, India, June 5, 2014.
Lobsang Sangay, prime minister of the Tibetan government-in-exile, right, presents a document to spiritual leader the Dalai Lama at the Tibetan Children’s Village School in Dharmsala, India, June 5, 2014.
William GalloVictor Beattie
Tibet's government-in-exile is unveiling a renewed bid for greater autonomy from China, in an effort to counteract Chinese government propaganda and reinvigorate disenchanted Tibetans.

It has been four years since talks stalled between China and representatives of the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama. Since then, conditions in Tibet have worsened and a wave of self-immolations has expanded.

As the violence and oppression continues, some exiled Tibetans have grown impatient with the Dalai Lama's so-called" Middle Way" approach, which aims to achieve autonomy, but not independence, from Beijing.

On Thursday, the India-based Central Tibetan Administration announced an "international awareness campaign," which it called its "most concerted effort to date to bring about basic freedom for Tibetan people."

Tsering Wangchuk, a press officer with the Central Tibetan Administration, told VOA the campaign is not only a call for solidarity, but also a response to China's distortion of its message.

"The awareness campaign is to counter the misrepresentation by Chinese government representatives about the Middle Way and the Tibetan government's call and the Dalai Lama's call for the peaceful resolution for the Tibetan issue. The Chinese government in the past few years has been aggressively misconstruing the actual call of the Tibetan people."

China has tried to portray the Dalai Lama as a dangerous separatist who has incited the 130 self-immolations that have taken place since 2009. The Dalai Lama rejects the accusations.

Many had hoped China's top leader Xi Jinping, who came to power in 2012, would be more open to dialogue on the Tibet issue, since his late father was a former vice premier who had a close relationship with the Dalai Lama.

John Powers of the Australian National University told VOA those hopes appear for now to be unfounded.

"It's very clear that China has no intention at all of holding any kind of talks of any substance, so a lot of people are wondering if a more proactive approach might be better."

Powers, an Asian studies professor with extensive experience on Tibet, said this concern is especially noticeable in the Tibetan exile community.

"The Dalai Lama is still of course very popular and very well regarded. But he's been trying this "Middle Way" approach for more than 50 years now and nothing substantive has come of it."

Powers said it is probably not a coincidence the awareness campaign comes just after the 25th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, when there is renewed interest in what he calls China's "oppressive system."

The Dalai Lama this week released a statement saying he prayed "for those who died for freedom, democracy and human rights" in the Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests in 1989.

China's Foreign Ministry angrily rejected the statement as having "ulterior motives and harbors evil intentions."

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Comments
     
by: Faye Faye
June 06, 2014 2:43 AM
I have heard that Dalai Lama and his cult were the Slave-Masters taking away the life time freedom from innocent people. So, there is no place for Dalai Lama and his cult to talk about freedom or democracy.

When the CIA were entering Tibet in Dec 1942 in search of a safe route for delivering military supply to China through Himalaya after the attack of Pearl Harbor happened, the agents were shock in seeing many Tibetan young slaves were cuffed with big chains. Obviously, those young slaves had run away and were caught.

After the Chinese Communist Party took over China, they decided to abolish the Slavery System, but met with resistance that was engineered by the Slave Masters led by Dalai Lama and his cult.

Eventually, the Slave Masters lost in the clash and were kicked out of China.

Dalai Lama and his cult have no representation of anyone other than representing a bunch of former ousted Slave Masters who used to ripe off innocent people.

If a bunch of greedy slave masters can self claim as a government-in-exile, then, any drug dealers, pimps, and criminals can also self claim as a government-in-exile.

In Response

by: JustMe
June 07, 2014 12:21 AM
You said it to yourself you just heard in other words you believe on a rumors.


by: Anonymous
June 06, 2014 1:11 AM
Good timing, Mr Da-Liar-Ama, for joing the barking at China from US, Japan, Philipines and Vietnam and "Saint slaughter" in Xinjiang!

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