News / Asia

Tibetan Monk Self-Immolates in China; Another Dies in Police Custody

Activists display portraits of people who killed themselves by self-immolation take part in a rally to support Tibet, Taipei, Taiwan, March 10, 2013.
Activists display portraits of people who killed themselves by self-immolation take part in a rally to support Tibet, Taipei, Taiwan, March 10, 2013.
Yeshi DorjeTsering Kyi
A Tibetan monk in China's Gansu province has set himself on fire to protest Chinese rule and call for the return of the Dalai Lama, according to recent news reports by China Xinhua News Agency.
 
The man, identified as Tsultrim Gyatso, set himself on fire and burned to death Thursday in Amchok, a town with a large ethnic Tibetan population.
 
Portion of handwritten note left by behind by Tibetan monk Tsultrim Gyatso, unknown location.Portion of handwritten note left by behind by Tibetan monk Tsultrim Gyatso, unknown location.
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Portion of handwritten note left by behind by Tibetan monk Tsultrim Gyatso, unknown location.
Portion of handwritten note left by behind by Tibetan monk Tsultrim Gyatso, unknown location.
A note that he left behind, obtained by VOA's Tibetan service from Tibetan exile sources, said in part “The oppressors have robbed our land’s treasures, the oppressors have stolen our peace and happiness.”
 
According to a man who would only give his name as Anjum, a native of Amchok now living in exile, authorities made his family conduct a rushed funeral service.
 
"The authorities ordered Tsultrim Gyatso’s family to cremate his body immediately, not allowing time for proper funeral prayers and services," he said. "This has caused a lot of anguish and anger in the community."
 
Exiled Tibetans are also reporting that 45-year-old Ngawang Jamyang, a Tibetan monk and scholar, has been beaten to death in Chinese police custody.
 
Ngawang Jamyang, a Tibetan monk, age 45, who is said to have died in police custody in China, seen teaching, unknow location, undated.Ngawang Jamyang, a Tibetan monk, age 45, who is said to have died in police custody in China, seen teaching, unknow location, undated.
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Ngawang Jamyang, a Tibetan monk, age 45, who is said to have died in police custody in China, seen teaching, unknow location, undated.
Ngawang Jamyang, a Tibetan monk, age 45, who is said to have died in police custody in China, seen teaching, unknow location, undated.
Jamyang, from the restive Driru area of the Tibetan Autonomous Region, was detained along with two other monks on November 23 while visiting Lhasa. The circumstances of his death are not clear and Chinese officials have not commented on the case.
 
According to one Belgium-based observer of Driru unrest in who identified himself as Samdup said Jamyang’s body was given to his family along with a warning on Tuesday.
 
"They told me he was killed from severe torture," Samdup said. "His family was warned that anyone who tells about his death to outside would be executed.'"
 
The fate of the other two monks remains unknown.
 
In August, the government in the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) launched a special patriotic campaign in Driru, ordering villagers to fly Chinese national flags from their rooftops. But people in at least two villages reportedly dumped the flags into a river.
 
Since then, there have been reports of protests, arrests and shootings by police.
 
Meanwhile, Wu Yingjie, the vice secretary of the Chinese Communist Party in TAR, recently completed a visit to Spain, where a court has issued arrest warrants for former Chinese President Jiang Zemin and three others for alleged rights abuses in Tibet.
 
Spanish media reports say Wu, the man who launched the patriotic campaign in Driru, lobbied officials in Madrid to halt the court case.
 
Since 2009, more than 120 Tibetans demanding the return of the Dalai Lama and Tibetan freedom have self-immolated.
 
This report was produced in collaboration with the VOA Tibetan service.
 

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Winston from: China
December 21, 2013 12:39 AM
and I want to ask Dalai Lama a question,how can you find all the suicides when they send themself into fire?how can you get all the messages about them?such as name,address,when they sent themself on fire ,you immediately sent the messages on websites.
so,why don't you persuade them to give up such foolish idea?


by: remie from: canada
December 20, 2013 7:36 AM
I never heard Dalai Lama encourage suicides or was slave owner. Your chinese propaganda government spread lies and fake history. They been practising this techniques for 1000 of years and your bias thinking cannot see the truth.
If China had it their way not only placards would be written in chinese but the world would be written in chinese and that aint funny

In Response

by: Winston from: China
December 21, 2013 12:52 AM
My friend,please come to China,please come to Tibet and live with the residents and talk with them ,may be they can give you a different Tibet.if you have some time,you can read the history of China,he can tell you that Tibet has been governed by the Chinese central government since Yuan dynasty.


by: Taiji Robinhood
December 19, 2013 5:06 PM
It is the Dalai Lama whose group is encouraging such suicides, which is very inhuman. Dalai Lama used to be the top slave owner in Tibet.


by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
December 19, 2013 3:44 PM
Funny, those placards were written in Chinese! Lol

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