News / USA

    Trump, Sanders Win New Hampshire Primary

    Bernie Sanders, left, and Donald Trump.
    Bernie Sanders, left, and Donald Trump.

    Democratic socialist Bernie Sanders and outspoken billionaire Donald Trump have won their respective New Hampshire primary contests, securing their first U.S. presidential primary election victories.  

    With 89 percent of polling places reporting, Sanders had 60 percent of the Democratic vote compared to 38 percent for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.  Trump had a similar margin for the Republicans as he grabbed 35 percent to win among a much more crowded field.

    In another closely watched battle, Ohio Governor John Kasich finished second in the GOP race with 16 percent.

    The results were in line with recent opinion polls, which showed the Vermont Senator Sanders and the New York billionaire Trump with comfortable, double digit leads over their rivals in the northeastern state.   

    • Jim Smith steps out of a voting booth after marking his ballot at a polling site for the New Hampshire primary, Feb. 9, 2016, in Nashua, N.H.
    • A voter marks his ballot in the first-in-the-nation presidential primary, Feb. 9, 2016, in Nashua, N.H.
    • Candidates' posters on display in front of a polling station in Ward 1, Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson / VOA)
    • Candidates' posters on display in front of a polling station in Ward 1, Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson / VOA)
    • People entering and exiting a polling station in Ward 1, Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson / VOA)
    • Early voting at Ward 7 in Nashua, New Hampshire. (Sasha Gong/VOA)
    • A ballot for the New Hampshire primary is entered into a machine at a polling site, Feb. 9, 2016, in Nashua, N.H.
    • A ballot for the New Hampshire primary is posted to the wall as a voter enters a polling site, Feb. 9, 2016, in Nashua, N.H.
    • Front page of Manchester Union Leader newspaper in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson / VOA)
    • Voters at Hood Middle School in Derry, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: S. Gong / VOA)
    • Voters at Hood Middle School in Derry, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: S. Gong / VOA)
    • Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets with customers as she stops at Dunkin' Donuts during the first-in-the-nation presidential primary, Feb. 9, 2016, in Nashua, N.H.
    • Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., shakes hands with attendees during a campaign stop at the University of New Hampshire Whittemore Center Arena, Feb. 8, 2016, in Durham, N.H.
    • Donald Trump greets restaurant patrons in Manchester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson/VOA)
    • Republican presidential candidate, businessman Donald Trump introduces his wife Melania during a campaign rally, Feb. 8, 2016, in Manchester, N.H.
    • Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, center, walks with aides toward his bus after a campaign event, Feb. 8, 2016, in Manchester, N.H.
    • Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., thanks volunteer Chris Ward, 26, of Tampa, Fla., by a white board counting down the hours until the New Hampshire primary at his campaign headquarters in Manchester, N.H., Feb. 8, 2016.
    • Ohio Governor John Kasich speaks during a Town Hall meeting, Feb. 8, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson / VOA)
    • Republican presidential candidate Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio, talks with his wife Karen before speaking at his last town hall meeting before Tuesday's first in the nation presidential primary, Feb. 8, 2016, in Manchester, N.H.
    • Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, autographs a sign for a supporter at a campaign event, Feb. 8, 2016, in Portsmouth, N.H.
    • Governor Chris Christie (Republican, New Jersey) supporters in New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson / VOA)
    • An audience member listens as Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks during a campaign stop at the University of New Hampshire Whittemore Center Arena, Feb. 8, 2016, in Durham, N.H.

    Candidates react

    “We are going to make America great again,” a triumphant Trump told supporters during a victory speech. “But we’re going to do it the old fashioned way. We are going to start winning again, and we are going to win so much, you are going to be so happy,” Trump added.   

    The quick victory for Sanders was in stark contrast to last week’s first nominating contest in Iowa, which ended in a virtual tie between him and Clinton.   

    VOA's Jim Malone reports from Manchester, New Hampshire:

    Outsiders Trump and Sanders Win New Hampshire Primaryi
    X
    February 10, 2016 7:02 AM
    Two political outsiders, Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders, were the big winners in their respective New Hampshire primary contests Tuesday. Ohio Governor John Kasich also had a breakthrough night with his second place finish behind Trump in the Republican race. The results suggest long and perhaps bitter fights ahead for both party nominations. VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has more on the New Hampshire vote from Manchester.

    ​Smiling broadly and laughing, Sanders stayed on message, focusing on economic inequality in his post-win speech to a cheering crowd.   

    “Together we have sent a message that will echo from Wall Street to Washington, from Maine to California. And that is that the government of our great country belongs to all the people and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors and their Super PACs (independent campaign committees),” Sanders said.  

    Video: Remarks from Bernie Sanders, Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump and John Kasich

    Top Candidates React to New Hampshire Wins, Lossesi
    X
    February 10, 2016 2:14 PM
    Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders and outspoken billionaire Donald Trump have won their respective New Hampshire primary contests, securing their first U.S. presidential primary election victories.

    Clinton, appearing alongside her husband, former President Bill Clinton, was upbeat and confident as she conceded defeat. 

    “Here’s what we’re going to do. We take this campaign to the entire country; we fight for every vote in every state; we are going to fight for real solutions that make a real difference in people’s lives,” she said.

    Watch: Manchester, New Hampshire voters speak out.

    New Hampshire Primary Voters Speak Outi
    X
    VOA News
    February 09, 2016 9:34 PM
    Residents formed long lines at polling stations Tuesday throughout New Hampshire to vote in a primary election set to shape the future of the Democratic and Republican presidential races. They talked about who they voted for, and what they think are the key issues this election.

    Results  

    It is still unclear just how big of a lead Sanders and Trump will earn.   

    Meanwhile, the soft-spoken Kasich, whose campaign has focused on issues rather than personal attacks, put nearly all his resources into doing well in New Hampshire.  

    “Maybe, just maybe, we are turning the page on a dark part of American politics, because tonight the light overcame the darkness of negative campaigning,” Kasich said after the vote during what felt like a victory speech.  

    Second-tier candidates

    Bunched up a few percentage points behind Kasich were Texas Senator Ted Cruz, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush and Florida Senator Marco Rubio.  They each got about 11 percent of the vote.

    It is not clear whether the result will further narrow the Republican field. But many analysts now say that Trump appears to be the consensus GOP frontrunner.   

    “When you consider all the negative comments that are made about him, all the attacks. If he can survive it, and beat all these guys by 10 points or more, then he’s clearly the frontrunner,” conservative pollster Frank Luntz told VOA.   

    There had been questions about whether Trump’s frenzied wave of support, which showed up in opinion polls and at massive rallies, would translate into votes. 

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts as former President Bill Clinton smiles at her New Hampshire presidential primary campaign rally in Hooksett, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.
    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton reacts as former President Bill Clinton smiles at her New Hampshire presidential primary campaign rally in Hooksett, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016.

    Voters chime in  

    But on Tuesday, New Hampshire voters seem to have answered that question, for now.  

    “I voted for Donald Trump because the economy is so bad, and I think he could probably be the best man to help,” said Roberta Latour from Merrimack, New Hampshire.   

    Voters across the state braved snowy conditions and waited in long lines at polling stations, turning out in what was expected to be record numbers.   

    Oscar Villacis is a Clinton supporter from Nashua. “My heart was telling me Bernie Sanders, but my mind was telling me Clinton,” he said.   

    The campaign now heads to South Carolina, where both Clinton and Trump have substantial leads.

    Donald Trump eats breakfast at the Airport Diner in Manchester, NH on the morning of the primary, Feb. 6, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson/VOA)
    Donald Trump eats breakfast at the Airport Diner in Manchester, NH on the morning of the primary, Feb. 6, 2016. (Photo: K. Gypson/VOA)

     

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Solaris
    February 10, 2016 5:01 PM
    Donald Trump has run a very good campaign, although his mission is impossible, his proficiency has left small room for unqualified candidates to gallop in the field of 2016. This is something new and auspicious, even democrats want real change this time by introducing Sanders as a new phenomena. These all are due to Donald Trump.

    by: Marcus Aurelius II from: NJ USA
    February 10, 2016 8:37 AM
    The results show that an increasing number of Americans have concluded that the US political system is so corrupt it is controlled by a relative handful of very wealthy people who have steered the economy in away that benefits only them and couldn't care less about American society as a whole or individual Americans. Tens of millions of American lives have been destroyed, these corrupt politicians having allowed those wealthy patrons to rob all other Americans to pay for their financial blunders instead of suffering the consequences themselves.

    These aristocrats are lucky. Americans can change their government to improve their lot by pulling levers on voting machines and do not have to resort to pulling levers on guillotines the way French people in similar circumstances did in 1789..

    by: Franklin Stein
    February 10, 2016 8:10 AM
    Hillary, is your past finally catching up to you? I hope so.
    In Response

    by: Marcus Aurelius II from: NJ USA
    February 10, 2016 2:08 PM
    Fact checking including recordings of TV interviews that can be seen on YouTube show that Hillary Clinton has changed her positions on many issues and outright lied about them when challenged. Not only are the lies unmistakable but so is the pattern. She is glib dismissing many of her mistakes and errors in judgment, even laughing about them. Her clumsy failed effort to erase 30,000 e-mails has resulted in an FBI investigation that reveals many discrepancies between what she said was on them and what the FBI actually found. Whether she is indicted for breaches of national security remains to be seen but I for one do not trust her and I think I am not alone. She also appears to be in the hip pocket of large financial institutions having received enormous fees each amounting to far more than most Americans earn in a year or two for each one lasting less than an hour. I have to wonder why any thinking American would vote for her.
    In Response

    by: Lou from: Atlanta
    February 10, 2016 9:39 AM
    I hear that, if she gets in, the first thing she is going to do is give herself a pardon.

    by: Moses608 from: Kenya
    February 10, 2016 5:58 AM
    What a combination of leaders the worldisgoing to have from 2017.Without doubt Trump will win USA presidency.Imagine having trump in Washington theway he is- fiercely American Corbyn in the UK as PM yet against all that which is British.Angela Merkel in Germany out to please the whole world.Panicky French presidents andtheir history.Corrupt and murderous African presidents.Immoral chinese leaders.The twin presidents of Russian andTurkey who resemble in deed so much thatthey havebegan to hate each other and drag the world to their lowly way of thinking.Leave out not bloody and evil Islamists.What a world!!!!!!!

    by: williweb from: Phoenix Arizona USA
    February 09, 2016 11:07 PM
    Trump is still at the top. Move over Washington cartel. You're being replaced.

    by: PermReader
    February 09, 2016 9:12 AM
    Why Mr Gallo calls Tump: billioner Trump, and does not call Clinton: millioner Clinton?( 200 millions ) - the open pro- Dem, pro - Hillary Blahs are loathsome!

    by: Kafantaris from: Warren, Ohio
    February 09, 2016 1:57 AM

    "Remember the old Wendy's commercial: 'Where's the beef?'
    At the end of the day, there was more meat [with Kasich] and there was less noise. To me, it came down between he and Jeb Bush. I think they were both great, but Kasich managed to stay out of the fray." -- Les Otten

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