News / USA

Top US Lawmakers Want Additional Iran Sanctions

FILE - The Senate (R) and the Capitol Dome are seen in Washington.
FILE - The Senate (R) and the Capitol Dome are seen in Washington.
Michael Bowman
U.S. lawmakers of both major political parties are expressing skepticism over last month’s interim accord on Iran’s nuclear program.  Congress’ appetite for boosting sanctions against Tehran has not waned, despite Obama administration warnings that heightened measures could torpedo delicate diplomacy.

FILE - Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) speaks at a news conference.FILE - Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) speaks at a news conference.
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FILE - Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) speaks at a news conference.
FILE - Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ) speaks at a news conference.
The chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Democrat Robert Menendez, says he would like nothing more than a negotiated solution to the international standoff over Iran’s nuclear ambitions.

“I hope the deal can be successful. Obviously, diplomacy is something we want to see work,” he said.

But, speaking on CBS’ "Face the Nation" program, Menendez said economic pressure against Iran must be sustained - and boosted if negotiations fail to yield a final accord.

“Prospectively looking for sanctions that are invoked six months after the date of enactment, that give the president certain waivers, creates the flexibility for diplomacy, and also sends the message to Iran that there is a consequence if you do not strike a successful deal,” he said.

FILE - Sen. Bob Corker speaks to members of the media.FILE - Sen. Bob Corker speaks to members of the media.
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FILE - Sen. Bob Corker speaks to members of the media.
FILE - Sen. Bob Corker speaks to members of the media.
The top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Bob Corker, says the interim deal is a mistake.

“I am very concerned, especially with this interim deal, how we get to a place where Iran is not enriching constantly, or where they are right on the verge, always, of being able to break out and create a nuclear weapon,” he said.

Corker says tightening sanctions would improve chances for what he terms “a better endgame” on Iran’s nuclear program, and expressed hope that a bill will come up for a vote in the Democratic-controlled Senate. Majority Leader Harry Reid has neither promised nor ruled out such a vote, saying the chamber needs time to study additional sanctions before taking action.

The State Department says imposing new sanctions while negotiations are ongoing would be a “mistake.” White House spokesman Jay Carney has warned against taking steps that would undermine diplomacy, saying, “The American people do not want a march to war.”

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by: larry from: nigeria
December 06, 2013 6:11 AM
The Americans are gradually weakening, get up or the Iranians too shall acquire these weapons like the north koreans watch out


by: Change Iran Now from: changeirannow@gmail.com
December 02, 2013 11:24 PM
Diplomacy is, without doubt, preferable to war or to the sanctions that have impoverished ordinary Iranians already struggling in a corrupt and mismanaged economy. Under the shadow of negotiations, however, Iran’s appalling human rights situation has hardly changed.

If anything, the alarming rate of executions seems to have increased in recent weeks. A handful of political prisoners have been released as a symbolic gesture, but many still languish in inhumane conditions. The torture of dissidents and the censorship of the media both continue as before. The persecution of religious minorities such as Bahais and Christians and of ethnic groups such as Ahwazi Arabs, Balochis and Kurds likewise continues unabated. The hard-line leadership is letting Iranians know that a strategic retreat in nuclear negotiations to end sanctions does not translate into reform at home.
The world must not disregard human rights in the coming months to conclude a comprehensive nuclear deal?


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
December 02, 2013 12:16 PM
"The Americans do not want to go to war" has been the defeatist agenda of the Obama administration which has drastically weakened the once powerful USA and reduced it to a beggarly and ordinary European crony of Iran, just the way Britain right now is - living in past glory. But it has been through the instrumentality of strong sanctions and military action that Iran began to negotiate in the first place. During the era of George Bush, this same "good old" Rouhani played the game of diplomatic jockeying which deceived then administration to remove use of military force from the negotiating table.

The world should not be seen to be begging Iran to do the right thing, having been seen to be aggressively pursuing nuclear bomb program. Even Russia knows it and has supported, tacitly, UN process of discouraging Iran, but seems to have little clout to achieve it, purporting to be Iran's UN mentor. The conceding to Iran's deceit is simply Obama's sympathetic leaning toward islamism. But should one man's ego be allowed to destroy the country and what it stands for? What is the picture like with a nuclear armed Iran - blue, red, amber?

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