News / Middle East

Trial Date Set for Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood Chief

A combo shows Khairat el-Shater (R), then presidential candidate of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, holding a press conference in Cairo on April 9, 2012 and Mohammed Badie (L), after he was appointed as the new leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, addressing a n
A combo shows Khairat el-Shater (R), then presidential candidate of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, holding a press conference in Cairo on April 9, 2012 and Mohammed Badie (L), after he was appointed as the new leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, addressing a n
VOA News
Egypt's military-backed interim government says it will put Muslim Brotherhood chief Mohammed Badie and one of his deputies on trial August 25 on charges of inciting violence.

Badie is at large while his deputy Khairat el-Shater is in a Cairo prison. They are accused of starting violence that led to the deaths of protesters outside Brotherhood headquarters in June - days before the military overthrew President Mohamed Morsi on July 3.

The Brotherhood and Morsi supporters have set-up two large round-the-clock vigils in Cairo, demanding his reinstatement.

Police helicopters dropped flyers over one of the camps Sunday, telling the protesters that the Brotherhood has "mentally kidnapped" them. The message says police will not harm demonstrators if they go home now.

The interim government has threatened to break up the protest camps, but now says it wants to give time for mediation.

It says there is a chance to end the protests without bloodshed while protecting the rights of all citizens. But it says the talks should take place in a "defined and limited" timeframe.

U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns is in Cairo meeting with interim leaders. The United States is urging all sides in Egypt to stop the violence and put together a transitional government that includes all sides.

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by: Godwin from: Nigeria
August 05, 2013 10:04 AM
Giving Muslim Brotherhood time frame for the trial is like giving them parameters for drawing a budget to last the period. Qatar has enough money to sustain the protests, but keeping them in the shadows would have been good to strain their patience. Now that they know, the military should be ready for their action to hold more people hostage in the camps with more money incentives to demonstrate at the court premises. What is happening between the Muslim Brotherhood and so-called supporters is eye-service and intimidation of a people afraid to speak up or own up their ground against the brotherhood.

Unable to show resistance against the brotherhood, they are compelled to rally with the brotherhood leading to reluctant supporters who find some courage to earn the day's money at the demonstration camps. If the people can summon some courage to vacate the camps, the Muslim Brotherhood will see reason to negotiate. But large crowds deceive and distort the strength and real motive of the demonstrations. If the brotherhood fails to cash in on the foreign emissaries' help to negotiate, they maybe faced with harsher conditions that will give them no room for inclusion in the new government. Let the brotherhood get the message clear that the Morsi govt is now history; Egypt should move forward, for that's only where there is room under the present government.


by: Sani Aliyu Hunkuyi(Mr.) from: Nigeria
August 04, 2013 9:20 PM
The visit by U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns to Cairo for a meeting with interim leaders is an opportunity for Muslim Brotherhood to offer itself for dialogue with a view to making corrections in its leadership style if re-elected. The Brotherhood should better go back to the drawing board, by restarting the planning process to re-capture power in view of the failure of previous plan. There is no doubt that in a fair election, the Brotherhood will turn out victorious in future elections. All the political process starting with Constitutional amendments, registration of voters etc should all be actively participated by members of Muslim Brotherhood at grassroots level. A revised Constitution should be able to address the process of appointment of army chiefs that would truly reflect the wish of majority populace as against the type of army chiefs we now have in Egypt viewed as stooges to Western interest. By the time next election takes place the same Mohammed Morsi may be re-elected. But to insist on his re-instatement may only waste time and lead to more loss of lives. The Brotherhood should remember the Treaty of Hudaybiyya under which the Prophet Muhammad (Peace be Upon him) accepted a number of conditions which were not comfortable with a number of his companions(Sahaba).

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