News / Middle East

Truce Holds in Gaza Ahead of Cairo Talks

Palestinians crowd a window for food aid at a United Nations distribution center in the Shati refugee camp in Gaza City, Aug. 6, 2014.
Palestinians crowd a window for food aid at a United Nations distribution center in the Shati refugee camp in Gaza City, Aug. 6, 2014.
VOA News

A fragile, 72-hour cease-fire in the Gaza Strip held for a second day on Wednesday, as Israel and Hamas delegates prepare for talks in Cairo aimed at extending the truce.

Egypt's intelligence chief met a Palestinian delegation in Cairo, the state news agency MENA said, a day after he conferred with Israeli representatives. The Palestinian team, led by an official from Western-backed President Mahmoud Abbas' Fatah party, includes envoys from Hamas and the Islamic Jihad group.

“The indirect talks between the Palestinians and Israelis are moving forward,” one Egyptian official said, making clear that the opposing sides were not meeting face to face. “It is still too early to talk about outcomes but we are optimistic.”

Egyptian and Palestinian sources said they expected later on Wednesday an initial response by Israel to Palestinian demands, which it has so far shown no sign of accepting.

The 72-hour cease-fire, which began early Tuesday, is the longest pause yet in the month of fighting that has killed more than 1,800 Palestinians, mostly civilians. Sixty-seven Israelis, including three civilians, have been killed.

Concessions necessary

 

Ahead of the Egyptian-brokered talks, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry told British media that both sides need to make concessions.

 

Kerry said the U.S. supports giving more freedom to Palestinians in Gaza. But, he warned, this "must come with a greater responsibility towards Israel, which means giving up rockets," thousands of which Hamas has launched into Israel in the past few weeks.

Hamas has been pushing for Israel to end the blockade that has strangled Gaza's economy and prevented Palestinians from leaving the crowded, impoverished enclave.

However, Hamas, which seized the Gaza Strip from forces loyal to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas in 2007, has ruled out giving up its weapons.

Israel said it is only willing to loosen its restrictions on Gaza if it receives assurances that Hamas will not be able to use that freedom to import rockets or other weapons.

“For Israel the most important issue is the issue of demilitarization. We must prevent Hamas from rearming, we must demilitarize the Gaza Strip,” Mark Regev, a spokesman for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, told Reuters television.

Red Cross visit

The President of the International Committee of the Red Cross Peter Maurer visited an Israeli receiving treatment in hospital on Wednesday, before heading to the occupied West Bank city of Ramallah to meet Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas.

Mauer visited Natan Meoray, an Israeli teenager receiving treatment in Barzilai hospital from wounds sustained from a rocket launched from the Gaza Strip.  

Mauer said that in every conflict, young and innocent people are the ones most affected.    

“I visit a lot of hospitals and medical facilities on this and the other side of front lines all over the world and in all those hospitals you see same innocent victims who suffer, same parents - I am not going to make comparisons from one place to another place,” Mauer said from the Israeli southern city of Ashkelon.

He later headed to the West Bank city of Ramallah, the seat of the Palestinian Authority, where he met Abbas.

Maurer visited the Gaza Strip on Tuesday, going to Shifa hospital, the main hospital in Gaza City that has been treating thousands of wounded civilians.

Tunnels destroyed

The Israeli army on Tuesday pulled its ground forces out of Gaza, saying it has successfully destroyed all of the 32 known tunnels Hamas has used to carry out cross-border attacks.

In Gaza, where about a half-million people have been displaced by a month of bloodshed, residents took advantage of the calm to visit shattered homes and stores, looking to salvage whatever is left of their lives. Many neighborhoods are unrecognizable piles of ruins.

Meanwhile, many Israelis are conflicted about the outcome of Israel's assault on Gaza. A poll by Haaretz newspaper on Wednesday suggested 51 percent of Israelis think neither Israel nor Hamas has won the conflict.

In New York, Jordan has circulated a Security Council resolution calling for a permanent cease-fire, lifting Israel's blockade of Gaza, and a global effort to rebuild the area.

Besides the loss of life, the war has cost both sides economically. Gaza faces a massive $6-billion price tag to rebuild devastated infrastructure. Israel has lost hundreds of millions of dollars in tourism and other sectors and fears cuts in overall economic growth this year as well.

Palestinian officials said a donor conference to raise funds for Gaza's reconstruction would be held in Oslo next month.

Also Wednesday, a delegation of Arab foreign ministers, including those of Egypt and Jordan, will visit Gaza "soon" in a show of support for Palestinians, Arab League chief Nabil al-Arabi told the French news Agency AFP.

The ministers will also assess reconstruction needs in the battered enclave after a nearly month-long war between Israel and Hamas, Arabi said.

Some information for this report provided by Reuters, AFP and AP.

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Comments
     
by: Lawrence Bush from: Houston, Texas
August 06, 2014 1:37 PM
The cease-fire in the aegis of president Sisi is welcome. Along with the UN, our friendly states and we Americans do whole-heartedly welcome this. After all, it's for the initial three days. But this cease-fire is a very risky one as further commotions between the Hamas and the Israeli side are forecast adhinc. For the sake of the lives of the Palestine people; for the sake of the Palestine statehood....... the militia groups like the Hamas, the Islamic Jehad, Al Aqsa brigade......... all that do necessiate to lay down their arms and politically stand as for a unitare national govt. and negotiate with Israel for getting back their lost territories;viz, West Bank and the Eastern Jerusalem. And, our friendly state Israel should remain as per the 1967 pre- Arab-Israeli war. ..........

But I do not believe it's possible for the Palestine radical organizations. Fomenting the catalyst for commotions, the Hamas has learnt the very consequences that's to emerge? And, the steps ahead of this three day truce, what're awaiting for both the warring sides that necessitate to be seen. The very cease-fire emerges for the commotion between the Hamas and Israel, the Hamas side had been the starter. Still the humanitarian conditions that the Hamas does keep forward that should be considered by the Israeli side. But the thing that matters most is - if such conditions of the Hamas side can be taken in bona fide fidens thereby clinically considering its security aspects of it........... After the Gaza blockade is lifted by Israel; what'er that're to reach Gaza for the civilians, the Hamas must not resort to its clandestine arms imports, spares even. Everything that should remain under the Israeli security checks; the added one is that of Egypt too. The essential humanitarian supplies to the Gaza strip from the hydro ports, entire corridor must remain under the security alert. ..........And, the Hamas must accept as the Gaza stip must stand as a completely demilitarized zone....... no piratical tunnels, no rocket depots, ..........

by: Ali baba from: new york
August 06, 2014 11:34 AM
This is not the end nor problem in the process to be solved. Both sides are failed to understand that Hamas has to stop violence and Israel should not act as a bully. The real victim are children and elderly who lost their as the result of irresponsible behaviors for both. Arab countries and Arab living in US have to stop supporting Hamas with money . second people have to give unconditional support for Israel. Israel is guilty as Hamas for crime against humanity . Israel please do not treat us as an idiot that Israel killed 1800 and ask 225 million dollars From USA .perhaps has the Jewish lobby as Muslim lobby can get what ever they want .What is a disgrace?

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