News / USA

    Clinton, Trump in Command of US Presidential Nomination Races

    From left, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., while Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally in West Palm Beach, Florida, March 15, 2016.
    From left, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., while Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally in West Palm Beach, Florida, March 15, 2016.
    Ken Bredemeier

    Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton have taken commanding leads in their months-long campaigns to claim their parties' 2016 U.S. presidential nominations, with both scoring impressive victories in contests on Tuesday.

    Neither Trump, a billionaire real estate mogul who has never held elective office, nor Clinton, the country's secretary of state from 2009 to 2013, has clinched a majority of delegates to their national party conventions in July to be assured of their party nominations, but both have built substantial leads over their remaining challengers.

    Of the two, Clinton's path to the nomination seems more assured.

    Clinton, looking to become the first female U.S. president, won four states Tuesday over her sole challenger, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and is leading in a fifth where votes are still being counted. She won contests in Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Illinois, and holds a small lead in Missouri.

    Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks at his presidential primary election rally in Berea, Ohio, March 15, 2016. His wife, Karen, and twin daughters, Emma, left, and Reese listen.
    Republican presidential candidate Ohio Gov. John Kasich speaks at his presidential primary election rally in Berea, Ohio, March 15, 2016. His wife, Karen, and twin daughters, Emma, left, and Reese listen.

    Clinton, the wife of former President Bill Clinton, has now won 66 percent of the convention delegates she needs for the Democratic nomination as the focus turns to voting in more state contests that run through June 14.

    The next Democratic contests are set for March 22 in the western states of Arizona, Idaho and Utah.

    Flamboyant candidate

    The flamboyant Trump, a one-time television reality show host, has amassed slightly more than half of the convention delegates he needs to win the Republican nomination.

    Trump, however, would need to win about 60 percent of the remaining available delegates in 21 state-by-state party contests to claim his party's nomination before the convention.

    His closest challenger is Texas Senator Ted Cruz, a conservative lawmaker who delights in aiming barbs at the Washington political establishment, Democratic and Republican leaders alike.

    Cruz said the race has culminated in a head-to-head match with Trump through the remaining party nominating contests, but Ohio Governor John Kasich won his home state Tuesday over Trump and remains in the race.

    Contentious battle

    Kasich, however, cannot mathematically win the nomination before the convention and is hoping neither Trump nor Cruz has enough pledged delegates either, throwing the contest into a contentious battle at the quadrennial gathering.

    Trump said it is time to bring the Republican Party together, vowing he will not stop until he "wins the country."

    Trump's resounding victory in the southeastern state of Florida, where he has a lavish second home estate, forced Florida Senator Marco Rubio to quit the race in an election night concession speech.

    Numerous establishment Republican figures had endorsed Rubio in hopes of stopping Trump, who many Republicans believe would lose November's national election to Clinton, a contention supported by numerous surveys showing her winning a hypothetical match over Trump.

    The winner of the election will succeed President Barack Obama, a Democrat who leaves office in January 2017.

    Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during a Republican primary night celebration rally at Florida International University in Miami, Florida, March 15, 2016. Rubio is ending his campaign for the Republican nomination for pr
    Republican presidential candidate Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks during a Republican primary night celebration rally at Florida International University in Miami, Florida, March 15, 2016. Rubio is ending his campaign for the Republican nomination for pr

    After polls closed Tuesday, Cruz said it is time for Republicans to unite behind his candidacy, noting that he has won several state contests against Trump in recent weeks.

    Cruz welcomed to his campaign those who had supported Rubio, saying, "America has a clear choice going forward."

    Unpredictable

    Numerous Republicans, including Cruz, say Trump is too unpredictable and has over the years adopted numerous policy positions tha are at odds with the dominant conservative party philosophy.

    One major anti-Trump group has been running a nationwide television ad in recent days, quoting his many comments disparaging women and another pointing attention to the melees that have broken out at some of his rallies between his supporters and those opposed to his candidacy.

    After Tuesday's results, former House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner endorsed his successor, House Speaker Paul Ryan, the losing 2012 Republican vice presidential candidate, to be the party's presidential nominee over Trump, Cruz and Kasich.

    Trump said his run for the White House has drawn new voters to the Republican contests, many of them angry at being ignored by Washington and Republican elites.

    He has struck a chord with some voters with his calls for construction of an impenetrable wall along the U.S. southern border with Mexico to stem the flow of illegal immigrants into the U.S. and temporarily banning the entry of all Muslims into the United States.

    WATCH: Related video by VOA's Jim Malone

    Trump and Clinton Big Winners in Tuesday Primariesi
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    March 16, 2016 5:45 AM
    Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton were the big winners Tuesday in the latest round of U.S. presidential primary voting. Trump’s victory in Florida ended the campaign of rival Marco Rubio. But Governor John Kasich kept his White House hopes alive with a win in his home state of Ohio. VOA National correspondent Jim Malone has a wrap up of Tuesday’s primary voting from Washington.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    March 16, 2016 12:38 PM
    Ohio loss monumental! Every other thing is right. Sorry Marco Rubio, you didn’t understand the mind of God and so went all out fighting it. Maybe you’d have emerged the man Trump’s runner-up or vice versa, but you spoilt your game by going all out to attack him. However, it must be said that while Trump wants to see that Americans get job before he lets in outsiders, he didn’t say he wasn’t going to open the doors again once the economy recovered and more hands needed both to support the productive system and the consumption of it afterwards.

    Fear is that if it goes to the convention, a gang-up of establishment Republicans can sabotage Trump’s free ride toe the White House. But if he wins, either by these states caucuses or at the convention, opportunities abound that some(and they’re many) disenchanted Democrats may crossover to ensure a Trump win, hence many want return of America to Americans, especially to eliminate/reduce prejudices. Wishing Cruz well, for once he sounded reasonable in these campaigns to speak with respect about Trump, while I hope Rubio, if he misses out as vice president, shouldn’t miss out on the office of Secretary of State.

    by: kafantaris from: Warren, Ohio
    March 16, 2016 12:21 PM
    If Cruz truly wants to help the GOP, he should get out of the race. He’s not electable anyway in November, so what’s the point of staying?

    by: Harris W. Gbahn from: Liberia
    March 16, 2016 9:46 AM
    The problem of many is blind loyalty which is too devastating. Perfect LOVE casts out fear and delivers one when being misled by egotism. Open rebuke is quite considerable rather than hypocritical love. Trump is a racist; his leadership is highly overshadowed by delusions. Let’s not be deceived by one’s wealthy position and throw out votes unconsciously. The world has become a global village and no nation is an island on its own; we need others most in our lives to make headway no matter how little and wretch they are.
    In Response

    by: meanbill from: USA
    March 16, 2016 10:42 AM
    Over 90% of Americans will vote for the candidate that promises to represent their own personal selfish self interests first and foremost, (like gays and lesbian, abortion, welfare, healthcare, more minority rights, race and religion), and they won't vote for the candidate that would best serve and protect Americans and America, first and foremost? .. (like Obama?) .. Over 90% of Americans are selfish people, and they'll only vote for the candidate that offers them the most of their own personal selfish interests? .. Ask them why they are voting for a particular candidate, and they'll tell you why, for the candidate that represents them, [and not] for the best candidate for America and all Americans? .. think about it?

    by: Banh Huynh from: USA
    March 16, 2016 8:12 AM
    Mr.TRUMP,You will not alone,American people support you.You are brave to make your own political way to save the USA.You have passed peacefully the political object of the GOP.By present the true you will be won.God bless you.

    by: PermReader
    March 16, 2016 8:05 AM
    The ridiculose and shameful result: liberals choose the establishment`s crony rich figure,compromized by numerouse mistakes on the edge of crimes, and bad deals,while conservatives have produced the strong revolutionary,who frightens the Republican establishment.

    by: Harris W. Gbahn from: Liberia
    March 16, 2016 6:42 AM
    Donald Trump, if elected will be the worse president America has ever produced. Leadership is not performed through emotion, anger, hatred and unnecessary castigation, most especially in the contemporary world we live now-a-day. I see him making so many enemies in the world.
    In Response

    by: Godwin from: qNigeria
    March 16, 2016 12:55 PM
    Think Harris W. Gbahn from: Liberia is jealous. What’s wrong with Trump making USA an American country? After all why do you need visa to travel to USA if all that hypocrisy were to be right about America? Even under Obama it’s been difficult for “good people” making US visa from outside, so what's wrong with Trump saying it rather than pretend everything is fine when the opposite is the case.

    I believe there'll be more peace in the world if every country has internal peace, not playing to the gallery, or bringing enemies too close for comfort - like sleeping with the terrorists - when everybody knows that the cultures have refused to blend - that is calling for more attacks from within; more dangerous than letting everybody be themselves.
    In Response

    by: meanbill from: USA
    March 16, 2016 11:00 AM
    Hey Harris _ America has never been so divided now since "the Lincoln War" and the Trump supporters want America to be what it once was, and for law and order to be restored so citizens don't have to carry guns to protect themselves and their families from the gangbangers, violent protesters, violent criminals and rioters, and want America to be great again? .. Trump wants a great America first and foremost, and doesn't make promises to those selfish Americans that want him to represent their own personal self interests first and foremost to get their vote? .. No president could be worse than the one we have now? .. No matter what they or their critics say?
    In Response

    by: jean from: lakeland flordia
    March 16, 2016 10:14 AM
    did you ever think that Donald Trump is a business man, and knows how to control his affairs, Whats wrong with you what makes you think Hilary Clinton can do any better wake up and see the real world , politics is all a bunch of lies let me ask you something are you on social security? can you live on it? well we are and we never got a raise either this year why? because the president denied us we need some one in there that cares please respond back
    In Response

    by: Dallas Weeks
    March 16, 2016 9:36 AM
    Harris, how you describe ineffective leadership "emotion, anger, hatred, and unnecessary castigation" perfectly describes the leadership qualities of Barack Obama. Trump might not be perfect, but literally anyone would be better for the interests of the USA than the current occupier of the White House who has actively worked to the detriment of the USA. Of course, if your intent is to weaken the USA the. Obama or most any other politician will suffice.
    In Response

    by: JEANBOWMAN from: FLORDIA
    March 16, 2016 9:17 AM
    whats wrong with these politicians don"t they know that the house of representatives run this country not the president of the united states, all these canidates get up there and make promises they can not keep whats wrong with the voters of America don" they know the difference or not? I was in politics for 17 years as a committeeman I know whats going on.

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