News / Europe

Turkey Downs Syrian Warplane Near Border

Kasab, Syria
Kasab, Syria
VOA News
Turkey has shot down a Syrian warplane during pitched fighting between Syrian rebels and government troops near the border.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the Syrian plane violated Turkish airspace.  Syrian state TV says the plane was pursuing rebels in Syrian territory.   

A Syrian military source said the pilot was able to eject.  A military spokesman described Turkey's action as "blatant aggression."

Erdogan warned Syria the "response will be heavy" if it violates Turkey's airspace.

Syrian rebels and government forces have been fighting for control of the Kasab border crossing in Syria's Latakia province for three days.

Meanwhile, political tensions sparked by the Syrian civil war continue to spill over in neighboring Lebanon.  Supporters and opponents of Syria's President Bashar al-Assad fought in a Beirut neighborhood overnight.  At least one person died in the gunbattle.

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by: Abdul Hannan from: Bangladesh.Dhaka
March 24, 2014 2:26 AM
Every nation should respect other nation and should not violet the international rules.

In Response

by: Anonymous
March 24, 2014 3:03 PM
As long as their is genocide being inflicted by an ex dictator on the population, it is the worlds business, sorry to say!!! We the world have a job to do, to bring assad to the Hague for a nice cozy seat so he can explain the thousands and thousands and thousands of unarmed civilians he has murdered. There is no escaping justice when you murder thousands. Nope.


by: Ali from: Iran
March 24, 2014 12:21 AM
look, Assad will retaliate against the stinky Turkey. The lying stinking turkis... the Al Qaeda terrorist sponsoring Turkis.


by: Igor from: Russia
March 23, 2014 11:29 PM
Using a F16 to shoot down an outdated Mig 23 is not a very difficult job for Turkey, especially when the Mig is flying near Turkye's border. The fact that the Mig was down inside Syrian territory proved that Turkey's action was completely illegal. The purpose of that action is to drive people's attention away from corruption scandals and to threaten and bully weaker neighbours.

In Response

by: Anonymous
March 24, 2014 3:01 PM
Who cares, assad is lucky the world hasn't gone in yet to take him out and force him to sit in the hague, by the ear. Afterall of all the so called terrorists in Syria, assad has still murdered the most unarmed innocent women and children than by anyone else. It is assad who is the terrorist kingpin that has to be straightened out, and forced to take responsibility for his crimes.


by: elmada oyani from: homa bay kenya
March 23, 2014 2:39 PM
it has been terible that only innocent ppl are the ones suffered the impact of war by no jugdment awarded to them.ever since syria has been a violating country for power with no regard consider its ppl as true roots of democracy.


by: Anonymous
March 23, 2014 1:32 PM
Excellent, more should be done to bring assad to justice for his crimes.


by: Not Again from: Canada
March 23, 2014 1:13 PM
I am not a fan of Erdogan because of his dictorial approch to ruling over the Turkish people; I hope he returns to a democratic path.
No question that Turkey not only has a duty, but an obligation to defend its territory against any agression over its borders. On repeated occasions Assad's chronies have fired and killed Turkish civilians, destroyed civilian structures, they have shot and killed Turkish military personnel carying out their duties on Turkish territory; the worst incident came about when Assad's chronies shot down an unarmed Turkish military aircraft, well inside Turkish soverign space. Given past experience, and considering that combat aircraft can cover 5 or 10 or more miles in a matter of a minute, Turkey needs to protect its citizens. It is surprising thatTurkey has not established a fire zone of up 10 to 20 Kms into Syria, to ensure that if it it needs to shoot down any aircraft, with a course heading into Turkey, it is done well before it can enter Turkish territory. These aicraft are fully armed with weapons, and even if Turkey manages to shoot down the intruding aircraft, as soon as it enters Turkish sovereign space, the debri, like bombs, rockets, explosives, fuel, etc have the potential to kill, wound, and destroy structures well inside Turkey;such an event can cause massive casualties. It is surprising that Turkey even allows such combat aircraft to near its borders, given all the past negative experiences.


by: Anonymous
March 23, 2014 11:21 AM
It is a violation of invading the sovereignty of Syria. It is a crime

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