News / Middle East

Turkey Says Syria Fires Again Across Border

A mobile missile launcher is positioned at a military base on the Turkish-Syrian border at Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 6, 2012. A mobile missile launcher is positioned at a military base on the Turkish-Syrian border at Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 6, 2012.
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A mobile missile launcher is positioned at a military base on the Turkish-Syrian border at Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 6, 2012.
A mobile missile launcher is positioned at a military base on the Turkish-Syrian border at Suruc in Sanliurfa province, October 6, 2012.
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VOA News
Turkish state media say another round of mortar fire from Syria has landed in southern Turkey.

The Anatolian news agency says Turkish military returned fire Saturday after the mortar round landed in a rural area amid intense clashes on the Syrian side of the border in Idlib province.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan warned Friday that Syria should not test Turkey's ability to strike back against continued cross-border attacks.

A Syrian attack on the Turkish town of Akcakale killed five civilians just days earlier. Following the attack, Turkish forces shelled Syrian targets, and Turkey's parliament authorized military operations outside its borders if necessary.

In Damascus Saturday, an aid shipment arrived from Russia to help with the humanitarian crisis.

"This is the fifth humanitarian shipment of aid to the Syrian people. This time the aid includes medical supplies and medicines," said Russian Ambassador to Syria, Azamat Kulmukhametov.

And in Aleppo to the north, citizens are continuing to cope with continued fighting for control of the country's most populous city.

A brigade commander for the rebel Free Syrian Army in Aleppo said rebels had hoped to drive the government troops from the city, but have not had the resources to do so.

"Since the Eid at the end of Ramadan two months ago, we wanted to take all of Aleppo and reach Damascus, but the lack of ammunition and the rockets from the jet planes have prevented us," he said.

The Syrian government refers to rebels fighting against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad as "terrorists."


Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

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by: Anonymous
October 07, 2012 5:02 PM
Turkish government is following a path to regional war. What an infantile leader erdogan is, he incapable of leading and needs to be replaced by a more sensible leader.


by: musawi melake from: -
October 06, 2012 7:17 PM
The sad thing here is that after trying very very hard several times to pass a UN resolution, similar to what was done in case of Lybia, that would enable them to interpret the way they want and go into action, the west is uneasy an arrogant to finish-off Assad, but Russia and China stand in the way. So, they should find another way to attack, in Iraqi case the US tarnished it's own intelligent agency's reputation by telling lies. Here they are helpless and the only way is NATO-charter, i.e. attack on anyone is attack on everyone. Therefore they use their coolies to fire from inside Syria, and then after a few rounds and angry remarks Turks will fight and probably lose, so the NATO with it's overwhelming force will enter the theatre. This time Iran will come for assistance, so Iran will also come under fire. Two-in-one!


by: Joe Richards
October 06, 2012 5:54 PM
The point is that Assad knows that he is losing, for whatever reason, and if he doesn't change the game he goes the way of Gaddafi, Hussein or Den Haag. If he was winning, fighting would die down and it isn't.

He is trying to change the rules by shelling Turkey. If Turkey invades, maybe Iran or Russia invades, too, and the result could be a split like the Koreas. In that situation, maybe there's a place for Assad and his sons. As any dictator, his priorities is himself.

There is no coincidence that the Turk Dude just visited with Iranians. He was figuring out what post-Assad or Syria-split the Iranians might accept.

Everybody knows Assad is going down, the question is how many civilians is he taking with him.


by: Anonymous
October 06, 2012 4:38 PM
FALSE FLAG OPERATION!!! Turkey wants an EXCUSE to go to WAR and save the insurgents. The USA should WARN Turkey to back off IF the USA REALLY CARES to PRESERVE HUMAN LIVES.

In Response

by: Anonymous
October 07, 2012 5:25 PM
Iraq should abrogate ALL treaties with the Turkish government, they have attacked northern Iraq repeatedly attacking the Kurdish rebels. Erdoggan's hypocracy is simply incredible!!! Erdoggan behaves like a bully, and its time the Turkish people get rid of him and his government.

In Response

by: Dr. Malek Towghi (Baluch) from: USA
October 06, 2012 10:31 PM
I fully agree with Anonymous. The Turkish scheme seems to be as follows: attack and capture the northeastern Kurdish region of Syria, 'accept' a 'ceasefire', asking the international community to declare this captured Syrian-Kurdish region a 'safe zone' for the dislocated Syrian Sunni Arab rebels and their families UNDER 'TEMPORARY' TURKISH ADMINISTRATION.

Please note that the Kurds of Syria have refused to join the anti-Asad rebellion, keeping the peace of their region. Knowing this, the Assad regime has withdrawn its forces from the Kurdish region allowing the Kurds to self-administer it. The emergence of another autonomous Kurdish region (after the one in Iraq) just along the larger Kurdish-populated areas of Turkey is the main reason for the Turks' Machiavellian maneuvers.

Such an internationally declared so-called 'safe zone' obviously financed and protected by the international community in the name of protecting Syria's internal Sunni Arab refugees will not be safe for the native Kurds. The millions of Syrian refugees now in Turkey and elsewhere will be brought to this Kurdish part of Syria, overwhelmingly Arabizing the region. Resisting but helpless Kurds will be massacred again by the already angry Syrian Sunni Arab 'refugees', of course backed by the chauvinist anti-Kurd Turks (who will be 'administering the 'safe' zone and armed by the anti Assad 'Free World' and financed by the supper rich Arabs. WILL THE WEST BE DUPED AGAIN?

In Response

by: arthurpkaske from: missoula montana
October 06, 2012 8:35 PM
Turkey should take it to them!

In Response

by: North Atlantic Rock from: Newfoundland
October 06, 2012 8:20 PM
Bloody troll. The only difference between Syria and Libya is Russian support for Syria. G'Daffy G'Duck lost his Russian sponsorship (I forget why) and they left him out to dry, as a lesson to their few remaining client states. The Europeans won't let the US risk a fight with Russia although I am sure that a few former Warsaw Pact members would like to see some grief land on Russia.


by: Joe Richards
October 06, 2012 3:48 PM
The Turkish PM needs to act to protect his people.

The only way to keep Turks safe is to resolve the conflict in Syria.

Assad does not like the Turks already, so the immediate step must be to remove Assad's capability to launch military aircraft.

Then, the question is should Turkey invade all or only parts of Syria.

It is hard to understand why any Syrian would think it's a good idea to bomb you own cities. Anybody involved in that activity needs to be removed from the future of Syria.

Anything less and more Turks will die, let alone Syrians.

It is very apparent that neither the UN nor Nato are designed for the problems of today's world. If I buy arms from a member of the security council and refrain from right-out war on a Nato member, I can bomb whatever I want?


by: musawi melake from: .
October 06, 2012 1:48 PM
As long as Turkey doesn’t stop harbouring terrorists on its soil, what right does it has to ask other affected state not to fire like this. Terrorism is terrorism whether it's been carried out by Mohamar Gadaffi eller Barak Husain Obama, both are sponsors of terrorism. If Obama can order drone strikes into Pakistan and call the Pakistanis to sop supporting Kashmiri insurgents' fight for freedom in India, and Israel can start a war into Lebanon, then why not Syrians or any other? Is it the kind of power wielded by one state that determines what it can do while others can't? Law should be same for all!, and there should be sanctions imposed on the Turkish state for supporting terrorism. Mr. Putin should seriously consider calling for sanctions against Turkey and black-listing some of the western states that aid terrorism. If it's justified to use terrorism as foreign policy tool for the West, so why not for the Pakistanis, whose country is after all an acronym for Punjab, Afghanistan, Kashmir and Sindh.


by: Anonymous
October 06, 2012 1:04 PM
Turkey is the beligererant. They are itching to attack Syria since their "rebels" are being defeated.


by: Thoth from: USA
October 06, 2012 12:28 PM
Turkey needs to step in and support the people of Syria. They are the power in the region, not Russia and not the USA. Turkey take your place in the region and help end the suffering.

In Response

by: Anonymous
October 07, 2012 5:05 PM
A second Ottoman empire? Is that what you suggest? LOL!!! They will "end the suffering" by putting Arabs in the grave. NO THANKS!


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
October 06, 2012 7:42 AM
I have said severally that Recep Tayyip Erdogan is not a good regional player. He is peremptory, fractious and reactionary. He does not think before he acts. Two previous occasions have proved him to be an unsuitable regional leader; one, when he walked out on the Israeli Prime Minister at a meeting on the sideline of the UN general assembly about three years back - something unbecoming of a leader; two, his reaction and support of the flotilla and threat to go to war with Israel over same. And now, having to bomb beleaguered and hapless Syrians already confused in the civil war bombarded from left and right and adding Turkey's aerial rout that gives the civilians nowhere to hide for safety. Erdogan, that is not a way to be regional power or leader. Turkey may have to wait for another leader if it is to be reckoned with as a unifying force in the region. In the meantime, all eyes are on Egypt - will its Arab blood permit it to make the difference? This is in doubt. Means there has to be a long wait before Turkey - the most outstanding democracy in the Arab/islamic world - comes to terms with itself, put its house in order and prepare to give the Arabs/islamic world the leadership that will launch the region into the comity of civilized countries. How long this wait is to be, no one knows, suggest not with Erdogan as PM or President.

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