News / Middle East

Turkey: Syrian-Downed Plane Was Over International Waters

Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu talking to an adviser, in Ankara, June 24, 2012, in this image made available by the Turkish Foreign Ministry.
Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu talking to an adviser, in Ankara, June 24, 2012, in this image made available by the Turkish Foreign Ministry.
Dorian Jones
ISTANBUL, Turkey -  The crisis between Turkey and Syria over Syria's shoot-down of a Turkish military jet has deepened, with Ankara saying the plane was shot down while it was in international airspace. Turkey is now looking for NATO's support. 

Speaking Sunday on state-run TRT television, Turkish Foreign Minster Ahmet Davutoglu said the pilots were testing the jet's radar capabilities when it was downed Friday over the Mediterranean.

"The warplane was shot down over international waters several minutes after it had left Syrian airspace," he said.

Damascus claims the plane was shot down while flying low and fast one kilometer off its coast. Davutoglu said the jet had strayed into Syrian airspace by mistake and immediately left after it was warned by Turkish air controllers.

Analysts say the admission the plane was in Syrian airspace will likely fuel growing calls by Turkish opposition politicians to know why the plane was flying so close to Syria, with relations between the two countries so tense.

On Saturday, Turkey's Deputy Prime Minister Bulent Arinc said the jet was a reconnaissance plane.

Damascus has accused Ankara of providing weapons and intelligence on its forces to Syrian rebels.

But Davutoglu denied the plane was involved in any covert action.

"The plane was not on a covert operation - it was on training mission to test radar, and the plane was unarmed," he said.

Turkey's prime minister has said he will be discussing the situation with the leaders of the main opposition.

Under Turkey's constitution, any military action against a foreign country has to be sanctioned by parliament, although ministers have played down speculation of any imminent armed response.

Political observers in Turkey say despite tense relations with Syria, the Turkish government response has so far been restrained and measured. U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon praised Ankara's behavior in the crisis.

Ankara is now seeking to build international support. The Turkish foreign minister said he will be meeting with NATO envoys on Tuesday under Article 4 of the alliance's founding treaty, which commits all members to protect one anothers' security and borders.

Turkey's government has promised its response will be strong, decisive and legitimate once the facts are known. The severity of that response could depend on the level of international support, along with the fate of the two pilots who remain missing.

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Comments
     
by: Ozgul from: Munich
June 26, 2012 2:21 AM
Turkey has all the latest NATO supplied fighter jets but they send in a decades old Phantom F4 rustbucket (that was probably due to be scrapped) over Syria???

No, this was a clearly orchestrated act of provocation by NATO using a dispensable piece of ancient airforce hardware in order to get a reaction from Syria and ratchet up the tesions. I'm even skeptical that the downed plane had any crew on board. What were the names of the flight crew? Will we ever know? Doubt it very much.


by: Yuri from: Russia
June 24, 2012 12:34 PM
British supported syrian's arabians while were seeking for ways to win Osman's turkeys(reed Lawrence of arabia "seven pillars of wisdom").
Now british and americans want to crash syrians arabians(russian ally) and support turkeys.
And turkeys and syrians bite each others like stupid puppies instead of making alliance.


by: Donald Berrian from: Massachusetts, USA
June 24, 2012 9:39 AM
At least their Constitution requires the military to get approval before attacking another country. Our Constitution requires Congress to declare war but that has been mostly ignored by our Presidents for the last century.

In Response

by: Mannshaft from: Beirut
June 24, 2012 1:03 PM
Apparently their neighbour's constitution does not require any sort of approval for slaughtering their own population.

In Response

by: Wyatt Larew from: USA
June 24, 2012 12:06 PM
Well Assad and putannanny Putin just slit their own throats now there is a reason to take him out! Putin is a Pu**y and Assad must have been dropped on his head!

In Response

by: Kevin Lam from: Colorado Springs
June 24, 2012 12:03 PM
Syria here we come!

In Response

by: TopMyCat from: Minneapolis
June 24, 2012 11:41 AM
The US Constitution is the worlds best. If you don't get that there's no help for you.

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