News / Europe

    Turkish PM Blames Protests on Extremists

    • Riot police officers gather in central Ankara, Turkey, June 10, 2013.
    • An anti-government protester gestures during a demonstration in central Ankara, June 9, 2013.
    • Anti-government protesters remove bricks from a sidewalk to build a barricade in central Ankara, June 9, 2013.
    • Riot police chase protesters at Kizilay Square in central Ankara, June 9, 2013.
    • Supporters of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan listen to his speech at the Ankara airport, June 9, 2013.
    • Supporters of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan cheer upon his arrival at Istanbul's Ataturk airport, June 7, 2013.
    • Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan waves to supporters after arriving at Istanbul's Ataturk airport, June 7, 2013.
    • Pedestrians walk among tents set up by protesters in Gezi park, Taksim Square, Istanbul, June 6, 2013.
    • People observe a destroyed urban bus with a destination sign that reads ''This bus goes to Dictator'' at Taksim Square, Istanbul, June 6, 2013.
    • Thousands of protesters gather for another rally at Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey, June 3, 2013.
    • Protesters carry the Turkish flag and shout anti-government slogans during a demonstration at Gezi Park near Taksim Squar, Istanbul, June 3, 2013.
    Turkey Largely Calm After Massive Protests
    Dorian Jones
    There have been more clashes in Turkey's capital, Ankara, between anti-government protesters and security forces, as civil unrest in the country continues. The prime minister condemned the protesters and called for calm. Protests are also continuing in Turkey's largest city, Istanbul.
     
    Around 1,000 protesters clashed with security forces in the center of Ankara. Police used tear gas and water cannon to break up the demonstration, as nationwide unrest continued for a fourth day. The protests are aimed against Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who is accused of ruling in an increasingly authoritarian manner.

    Turkish President Abdullah Gul, meanwhile, appealed for calm, defending the right to protest and telling the protesters their message had been heard. 
    But Prime Minister Erdogan, speaking ahead of a visit to North African countries, continued his attack on the demonstrators, accusing them of being marginal and pawns of the main opposition party.
     
    Thousands of people gathered Monday in Gezi Park in the heart of Istanbul, where the nationwide unrest began as a protest against the construction of a shopping mall there, in preparation for another protest. The overwhelming majority of the protestors are young but appear to represent a large cross section of society. There are no visible signs of the mainstream political parties, and the protest still appears to be made up of people not associated with country's political parties. 
     
    Many demonstrators are angry at the prime minister's latest attack. "The prime minister's address to the people I find it extremely provocative and alienating. I think with every speech he is making, he is losing it, he is losing more and more support," said one. 
     
    Despite calls from Turkey's political rulers to end the protests, few people expect an early end.
     
    "Turkish people can't act immediately; it is very difficult to make fire on them. But when it starts, it's hard to stop. Because we are not [a] very reactive people. It's an accumulation after 10 years; you have to listen to these people as well," said one man. 
     
    While there was a carnival atmosphere among the protesters in Gezi Park on Monday, there was also concern that the violence which occurred between demonstrators and security forces in Istanbul on the previous three nights might be repeated.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Adem from: Turkey
    June 04, 2013 3:27 AM
    I accused anti-government protesters of walking "arm-in-arm with terrorism," I blamed "extremist elements" for three days of some of the most violent riots in years.The media has failed.TV channels were not succesful in reporting accurate news.Because of that,a lot of erroneous informatşon floated around social media.The last bout of incidents have shown how powerful Twitter is.Turkey has been sad incidents that is not deserve.News reports about incidents have appeared in the foringn media.Whic does not please any of us.

    by: Anonymous
    June 04, 2013 1:30 AM
    the these incidences is not releated to islam.but some marginal groups reclects that as if islam order.and now some people who has not good intent,thougt trying to connect these incidence with islam. protests has been launching with good intent(for democratic rights) but its course was changed to different ways.these groups was starting to devostate think what they encounter on their way. main opposition party could not calm them. they find them right so incidence can not slow sufficiently.main opposition party has not won bailot for years. they have been close army for years.so they have a big angry himself and they emerge their angry such way that devostating circumtances

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    June 03, 2013 11:54 PM
    It is reported in Japan this unrest is caused by people's opposition to the Islamic policies having been raised by present government. This point is not mentioned in this article. What is the truth?

    In addition, it is suspected that these messes might affect disadvantageously on the coming election of Olympic games invitation.I hope politic stability would lead to the Istanbul Olympics. Thank you.

    by: Zumar Attli from: Turkey
    June 03, 2013 11:34 PM
    the point here is that the US and Russia must help the secular Turkish people depose the filthy cancer Turkish Muslim Brotherhood - "Justice" and Destruction Party... you must help us... the USA of America and Russia both love Israel - listen to us - Turkish people love Israel to... we hate the Arabs... but Erdogan wants to destroy Israel... believe... America of America must help Turkey get rid of Muslims here... you have got to help us... its for your sake!!!

    by: Igor from: Russia
    June 03, 2013 10:47 PM
    It seems that the Spring Uprising has touched Turkey. But now is summer so we should call it "the Summer Uprising" to create a real democratic society in a member of NATO. To do it, Erdogan should give up his power or he will end up like Gaddafi.

    by: Frank from: US
    June 03, 2013 6:56 PM
    Islamic democracy in action. Where Islam goes, ignorance, poverty and disease follow.

    by: Murat from: Izmir Turkey
    June 03, 2013 6:17 PM
    I am really stunned that Americans still think that this is about f565 "trees" and f6768 "parks" - hey fools, this is about Islamic dictatorship its about Muslim oppression - let me tell you something you don't know... life in Turkey today is like living under Hamas rule... its like life in an Islamic sewer - Islamic secret police are everywhere... its like living in Iran... the truth is that we are sick of this Turkish Muslim Brotherhood b.s.

    we just want our country back from this islamic filth
    In Response

    by: Anonymous
    June 03, 2013 9:12 PM
    hey man. this is none of USA's business right? you can be like a saint and do something for the people in Turkey, but you can never call for any forces in the White House to interfere the the mess there.

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