News / Asia

Typhoon Wipha Kills At Least 17 in Japan

Typhoon Wipha Kills At Least 13 in Japani
X
October 16, 2013 7:15 AM
A powerful typhoon is moving up Japan's Pacific coast, bringing heavy wind, strong rain and causing mudslides that have killed at least 13 people.

Typhoon Wipha Kills At Least 17 in Japan

VOA News
A typhoon killed 17 people in Japan on Wednesday, most on the offshore island of Izu Oshima, but largely spared the capital and caused no new disaster as it brushed by the damaged Fukushima nuclear power station.

More than 50 people were missing after the once in a decade Typhoon Wipha roared up Japan's east coast. About 20,000 people were told to leave their homes because of the danger of flooding and hundreds of flights were cancelled.

Izu Oshima island is located south of Tokyo. Several houses were destroyed or swept away. The storm caused rivers to burst their banks and set off mudslides along a 1.2-mile stretch of mountains. Television footage showed roads clogged with wreckage and houses with gaping holes smashed into them.

"I heard a crackling sound and then the trees on the hillside all fell over,'' an Izu Oshima resident told NHK television.

The storm also disrupted the morning commute as it brushed past Tokyo, halting trains, canceling flights, and shutting down schools and offices.

Kyoichi Ito, a commuter stranded by the storm, said the storm was worse than any he remembered.

"I haven't seen it this bad. I was in a store and when I came out, I was really surprised," said Ito.

  • A woman reacts in front of collapsed houses following a landslide caused by Typhoon Wipha on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Oct. 16, 2013.
  • A man walks near collapsed houses following a landslide caused by Typhoon Wipha on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Oct. 16, 2013.
  • Firefighters search for missing people among collapsed houses following a landslide caused by Typhoon Wipha on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Oct. 16, 2013.
  • Rocks are seen in a residential area following a landslide caused by Typhoon Wipha in Kamakura, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Oct. 16, 2013.
  • Rescue workers recover the body of a victim from a site that was damaged by a landslide caused by Typhoon Wipha in Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Oct. 16, 2013.
  • An aerial view shows collapsed houses following a landslide caused by Typhoon Wipha on Izu Oshima island, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo, Oct. 16, 2013.

The capital appears to have avoided major damage, though authorities are searching for two young boys missing after playing on a beach and one woman was swept away by a swollen river in western Tokyo. An additional 20 people have been hurt by falls or from being struck by flying debris.

The operator of the Fukushima nuclear plant, Tokyo Electric Power Corp, cancelled all offshore work and secured machinery as the storm approached.

Tepco has been struggling to contain radioactive leaks at the Fukushima plant since a 2011 earthquake and tsunami caused extensive damage and triggered the world's worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl in 1986. During prior storms, heavy rains have contributed to leaks of radiation.
 
A Tepco spokesman said Typhoon Wipha had caused no new problems at the plant, which is on the coast 130 miles north of Tokyo. The rainwater was checked for radioactivity and released into the sea, the spokesman continued.
 
Wipha was downgraded to a tropical depression by the early afternoon in Japan. At its height, it had sustained winds at its center of 78 mph and gusts of up to 112 mph.
 
Typhoon Wipha was the strongest storm to hit the region since October 2004. That cyclone triggered floods and landslides that killed almost 100 people, forced thousands from their homes and caused billions of dollars in damage.

Some information for this report was provided by Reuters.

You May Like

China Investigates Former Powerful Security Chief

Former security chief and member of Politburo Standing Committee, Zhou Yongkang, under investigation for suspected 'serious disciplinary violation' More

India, US Look to Reset Ties During Kerry Visit

This week's talks will be first high level interaction between two countries since Prime Minister Narendra Modi took charge More

Video Young African Leadership Program Renamed to Honor Mandela

YALI program, launched by President Obama in 2010, aims to build skills in business, entrepreneurship, public management and civic leadership More

This forum has been closed.
Comments
     
There are no comments in this forum. Be first and add one

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid