News / Africa

Uganda Moves Forward on Anti-Gay Bill

People protest against Uganda's proposed anti-homosexuality bill in New York on Nov 19, 2009.
People protest against Uganda's proposed anti-homosexuality bill in New York on Nov 19, 2009.
Andrew Green
Uganda’s speaker of parliament has promised a controversial anti-homosexuality bill will pass by the end of the year. A new coalition led by the former state minister for ethics says the country is prepared to deal with any international fallout.

The Coalition for Advancement of Moral Values does not officially launch until next week. But last Friday, the group of religious and civil society leaders organized a meeting with more than one-third of Uganda’s members of parliament. There they pushed for the reintroduction of a bill that would broaden rationalization of homosexuality.

Before the meeting ended, Rebecca Kadaga, the speaker of parliament, promised the bill would pass before the end of the year. James Nsaba Buturo, the former ethics minister and a coalition leader, says the measure’s widespread popularity will speed its approval.

“I can tell you it has 99 percent chance. It will pass. No question about it," Buturo said. "If there was any leader in this country who sympathizes with homosexuality, he will not say it in public. Because he knows that Ugandans, by and large, do not support that way of life.”

The bill was originally introduced in 2009. The initial version included the death penalty for some actions, like engaging in sexual activity with people under 18. Buturo says the death penalty language has now been stripped from the legislation and replaced with shorter prison sentences.

But the proposal has still drawn widespread international criticism. U.S. President Barack Obama calls it “odious” and some international donors threaten to cut off aid if the bill is signed into law.

Buturo says outsiders who criticize the bill are engaging in a “culture war” with Uganda. He says the bill’s re-introduction after being shelved by the last parliament shows his country will not be deterred by threats of aid cuts.

“We are saying to the world and to those who are supporting this way of life of theirs, ‘Come what may.’ They have no right whatsoever to impose their preference on this nation," he insists.

Clare Byarugaba, the co-coordinator of the Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law says gay rights activists are pessimistic.

“The time that we have from now until Christmas, is a very short time for a bill to be tabled and then debated and then passed," Byarugaba says. "But, of course, there’s fear that it can actually happen.”

Because the bill’s proponents are framing the debate as a culture war between Ugandan and Western cultures, Byarugaba says her coalition is looking to activate local human rights groups to speak out in opposition.

“We call upon the international community not to speak out in the media about these issues. Whatever actions that are going to be done, should be done diplomatically, with the relevant stakeholders of this country," she says. "And, let the Ugandan community and the Ugandan human rights organizations and allies to do the groundwork.”

They are also preparing to raise constitutional challenges to the bill, if it does pass.

Parliament’s Legal and Parliament Affairs Committee is considering the bill before it can be tabled in front of the whole house.

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Comments
     
by: Maria from: Uganda
December 07, 2012 7:44 AM
For all the gay activists in America and the entire world your criticizing of the bill is just making it porpular in my country where it was never going to be passed in the first place it had been dismissed but this business of you people showing off how you are helping us greatly with your aid which in actual sense is enjoyed by top government officials is making Ugandans angry because you think we can't survive without your help and most importantly it is being viewed in my country as imposing western culture on our African culture and because of this that bill may pass just to show you people that we can never be intimidated by your funny threats. So you may think your helping but actually your not if you had ignored this whole thing deep down i know it would never have coz it was harsh in the first place but now it has been revised and the death penalty removed and i do believe the speaker is also in support because the Canadian prime minister tried to threaten her. But now it's too late and there is nothing that can be done. FOR GOD AND MY COUNTRY.

by: Nicole H from: usa
November 17, 2012 8:34 AM
Stop foreign aid to this country until they show some objective measures of improvement in human rights. The ignorance and hate will abruptly stop when the foreign money stops.
The people who quote Leviticus to support this bigoted and hateful barabric view are absolutely ignorant with a 3rd grade knowledge of basic theology. Funny how they ignore the other laws about stoning a disobedient child or someone who works on the Sabbath. Or planting two different crops in the same field as an abomination just as eating shrimp or lobster...lol.
Rather than trying to understand the Bible as a book written in a patriarchal culture with minimal scientific understanding of the world, they choose to select passages to interpret literally to affirm their prejudice. It is anything but Christ like.
In Response

by: Maria from: Uganda
December 07, 2012 7:29 AM
and you think cutting off foreign aid is going to achieve what exactly you people forget we are mainly an agricultural country so people can not really starve because they actually grow their own food plus in case you did not know the money that is sent as aid is used by top government officials to satisfy their own selfish needs so basically that money has not been put proper use anyway so nothing will change I pray with all my heart that bill is passed just to show all of you people that we can actually survive without your so called help.

by: John from: California
November 16, 2012 5:12 PM
I will support economic sanctions. If Uganda wants to do without our values, they can also do without our money, medicines, products...we do not support Barbarians

by: ljrich from: US
November 16, 2012 3:19 PM
Africa will forever be considered a 3rd world country if it cannot move past its violent history.

by: sweetza Richard from: Kampala
November 16, 2012 11:03 AM
Uganda is a funny country with brain-washed 'believers in the Bible' How can we again be slaves to something else? Are we not slaves of religion? Why should u kill innocent people in the name of religion?
In Response

by: Marty from: Sulphur, Oklahoma
November 16, 2012 7:55 PM
The country of Uganda probably based their law on Leviticus 18:22 and Leviticus 20:13, and GOD will bless them for it because they stand for Biblical truth.

by: Marty Butler from: Sulphur, OK
November 14, 2012 12:13 PM
GOD will richly bless Uganda for their Biblical stance on this abominable sin.
In Response

by: Marty from: Sulphur, Oklahoma
November 16, 2012 7:50 PM
You are not to sleep with a man as with a woman; it is detestable. Leviticus 18:22 HCSB
If a man sleeps with a man as with a woman, they have both committed a detestable thing. They must be put to death; their blood is on their own hands. Leviticus 20:13 That is Uganda's law is based out of, the Roman empire violated this Bibliical principles, and they fell.
In Response

by: John D'Ambra from: Butler, NJ
November 16, 2012 4:07 PM
And may that GOD punish "your kind" who put Hate/Violence mongering Bigotry before Human Equality...
In Response

by: leslie
November 16, 2012 10:12 AM
if this passes i want to invade them, let us do what we do best.
In Response

by: jack
November 15, 2012 6:28 AM
We reserve the right to assemble and protest en masse in front of their embassies/consulates worldwide.
In Response

by: jomutenga from: uganda
November 15, 2012 1:53 AM
It appears many forget the first commandments of being fruitful and multiplying. So when it was not good for man to be alone, was another man was created!!!!
In Response

by: Mike from: Japan
November 14, 2012 8:10 PM
Absolutely. Because I believe the commandment was "imprison and spread hatred of your neighbors" right?

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