News / Africa

Ugandan Police Shut Down Newspaper Offices

Policemen stand guard outside the Daily Monitor newspaper's offices in Kampala on May 20, 2013Policemen stand guard outside the Daily Monitor newspaper's offices in Kampala on May 20, 2013
x
Policemen stand guard outside the Daily Monitor newspaper's offices in Kampala on May 20, 2013
Policemen stand guard outside the Daily Monitor newspaper's offices in Kampala on May 20, 2013
TEXT SIZE - +
— Police in Uganda's capital have closed down the offices of  the Daily Monitor. According to the Daily Monitor's senior correspondent, police have declared the premises of their publication a crime scene and are doing a thorough search of the building.

Earlier this month, the Daily Monitor published a series of stories about Uganda's coordinator of intelligence services, General David Sejusa. The general has demanded an investigation into alleged plots to assassinate key military and government officials who are seen to oppose President Yoweri Museveni’s alleged plans to install his son as his successor.

Last week, the Criminal Investigation Department interrogated the authors of the story and the managing editor of the Monitor for three days, pushing them to disclose the source of their information. They declined.

In response, police obtained a court order telling the journalists to name their source, and also authorizing police to search for a letter written by the general that is held in the publication's offices.  

Government spokesman Fred Opolot says the country’s security was compromised when  the newspaper, published the  letter, “It is alleged by the police [the letter] was doctored by some of the media houses and that prompted an investigation," Opolot said.

Daily Monitor reporter Tabu Butagira told VOA about the police takeover of the newspaper's offices.

“Everything is calm, but tense, very tense ...  At the moment no staff is allowed to leave the premises and the police have taken over the charge of the gate and now they are at the printing press which they want to disconnect it,” Butagira said.

In a post on Facebook, Ugandan police said "We shall continue 2 occupy & search Monitor and Red Pepper premises until we retrieve the said letter of Gen.Sejusa."

Security forces have taken off the air the Daily Monitor's sister radio stations KFM and Dembe FM.  Butagira says there is a systematic search of drawers and lockers, and police have threatened to confiscate cameras and phones.

He says the paper's refusal to disclose the source of their information has agitated security officials.

“So because the paper has been ... unwilling to disclose the source of its information there is suddenly unexpected, high-handed response by [the] government by deploying the police and plain clothes security guards who have now besieged the Monitor head office.  They are clearly interested in finding out, I guess, how the newspaper acquired information about the spy master’s letter to his subordinate,” Butagira said.

General Sejusa has not denied authoring the letter.  Part of the letter reads “I gave detailed intelligence information of some of those claims, like the so-called project of the son being fast tracked outside the law to hold serious positions, many of which he may not be qualified by the set standards, like experience in command and seniority.”

The letter also states that the succession issue is becoming a source of intrigue in the army.

President Museveni, who is in his late 60s, has led Uganda since taking power in a 1986 coup.  His son, Kainerugaba Muhoozi, commands the special forces group responsible for presidential security.

VOA's Peter Clottey contributed to this report from Washington.

You May Like

Wikipedia Proves Useful for Tracking Flu

Technique gave better results than Center for Disease Control (CDC) and Google’s Flu Trends More

Turkish Law Gives Spy Agency Controversial Powers

Parliament approves legislation to bolster powers of intelligence service, which government claims is necessary to modernize and deal with new threats Turkey faces More

Video Face of American Farmer Changing

Average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Jonathan Buttall from: USA
May 20, 2013 7:57 PM
We've traveled around the world including North Africa. However, we've written off sub-Saharan Africa for this lifetime. We've visited places that were Kingdoms (2) and dictatorships (2) but do draw the line somewhere. Sub Saharan Africa seems to be little more than anarchists and brutal dictatorships bent on continuing slavery and genocide, with kidnapping and mercenary murder as their main occupations. How is this an improvement on colonialism?

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Face of American Farmer is Changingi
X
Mike Osborne
April 18, 2014
The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Face of American Farmer is Changing

The average American farmer is now 58 years old, and farmers 65 and older are the fastest growing segment of the population. It’s a troubling trend signaling big changes ahead for American agriculture as aging farmers retire. Reporter Mike Osborne says a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau is suggesting what some of those changes might look like... and why they might not be so troubling.
Video

Video Donetsk Governor: Ukraine Military Assault 'Delicate But Necessary'

Around a dozen state buildings in eastern Ukraine remain in the hands of pro-Russian protesters who are demanding a referendum on self-rule. The governor of the whole Donetsk region is among those forced out by the protesters. He spoke to VOA's Henry Ridgwell from his temporary new office in Donetsk city.
Video

Video Drones May Soon Send Data From High Seas

Drones are usually associated with unmanned flying vehicles, but autonomous watercraft are also becoming useful tools for jobs ranging from scientific exploration to law enforcement to searching for a missing airliner in the Indian Ocean. VOA’s George Putic reports on sea-faring drones.
Video

Video New Earth-Size Planet Found

Not too big, not too small. Not too hot, not too cold. A newly discovered planet looks just right for life as we know it, according to an international group of astronomers. VOA’s Steve Baragona has more.
Video

Video Copts in Diaspora Worry About Future in Egypt

Around 10 percent of Egypt’s population belong to the Coptic faith, making them the largest Christian minority in the Middle East. But they have become targets of violence since the revolution three years ago. With elections scheduled for May and the struggle between the Egyptian military and Islamists continuing, many Copts abroad are deeply worried about the future of their ancient church. VOA religion correspondent Jerome Socolovsky visited a Coptic church outside Washington DC.
Video

Video Critics Say Venezuelan Protests Test Limits of Military's Support

During the two months of deadly anti-government protests that have rocked the oil-rich nation of Venezuela, President Nicolas Maduro has accused the opposition of trying to initiate a coup. Though a small number of military officers have been arrested for allegedly plotting against the government, VOA’s Brian Padden reports the leadership of the armed forces continues to support the president, at least for now.
Video

Video More Millenials Unplug to Embrace Board Games

A big new trend in the U.S. toy industry has more consumers switching off their high-tech gadgets to play with classic toys, like board games. This is especially true among the so-called millenial generation - those born in the 1980's and 90's. Elizabeth Lee has more from an unusual café in Los Angeles, where the new trend is popular and business is booming.
Video

Video Google Buys Drone Company

In its latest purchase of high-tech companies, Google has acquired a manufacturer of solar-powered drones that can stay in the air almost indefinitely, relaying broadband Internet connection to remote areas. It is seen as yet another step in the U.S. based Web giant’s bid to bring Internet to the whole world. VOA’s George Putic reports.
AppleAndroid