News / Europe

Three Reported Dead in Ukraine Clashes

Pro-European protesters take cover behind a burnt bus during clashes with riot police in Kyiv, Jan. 22, 2014.
Pro-European protesters take cover behind a burnt bus during clashes with riot police in Kyiv, Jan. 22, 2014.
VOA News
Officials in Ukraine have confirmed three anti-government protesters have died in the capital, Kyiv, in new clashes with police.

Two protesters were reported to have gunshot wounds. A medical official said another activist fell to his death at the site of the clashes.

Reports indicate the police were trying to dismantle a protest camp in Kyiv Wednesday and fired tear gas at demonstrators, who responded by hurling stones and homemade explosives at police.

The U.S. embassy in Kyiv said in a statement Wednesday that it has revoked the visas of several Ukrainian nationals linked to the violence. The names of those Ukrainians were not released.

Also on Wednesday the European Union's foreign policy chief, Catherine Ashton, urged "an immediate end" to the escalating violence. After the reports of deaths, she "strongly" condemned the violence.

On Tuesday, Ukrainian prime minister Mykola Azarov had warned the protesters that authorities might use force. Azarov told Russia's Vesti 24 television that if those he called "provocateurs" did not stop inciting clashes, officials would have no other choice.
 
He said he hopes common sense will prevail and that many issues can be resolved at the negotiating table.
 
Anti-government protesters marched through Kyiv for a third straight day Tuesday. Fighting between police and demonstrators has injured hundreds.
A pro-European protester gestures, with riot police officers seen in the background, during a rally in Kyiv, Jan. 22, 2014.A pro-European protester gestures, with riot police officers seen in the background, during a rally in Kyiv, Jan. 22, 2014.
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A pro-European protester gestures, with riot police officers seen in the background, during a rally in Kyiv, Jan. 22, 2014.
A pro-European protester gestures, with riot police officers seen in the background, during a rally in Kyiv, Jan. 22, 2014.

Ukrainians took the streets in response to President Viktor Yanukovych's decision in November to back out of a plan to sign a trade deal with the European Union in favor of closer ties with Russia.
 
At their peak late last year, protests in Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, were drawing hundreds of thousands of people.
 
Rallies grew in size again last week when pro-Yanukovych lawmakers in parliament hastily passed restrictive anti-protest laws, which have been condemned by a number of Western governments as undemocratic.

Yanukovych has formed a working group of government representatives to meet with opposition leaders to address their grievances. The opposition demands to negotiate with Yanukovych directly.
 
Meanwhile, Moscow, Ukraine’s former Soviet overlord, has blamed elements in Ukraine’s opposition for the latest violence in Kyiv, accusing them of acting against European norms. Commenting on the situation in Ukraine, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said it is "spinning out of control." He added that Russia will do everything it can to help "stabilize the situation" without meddling in Ukrainian domestic affairs.
 
In Washington, the U.S. Broadcasting Board of Governors expressed outrage over bloody police attacks on dozens of journalists in Kyiv, including RFE/RL reporter Dmytro Barkar and cameraman Ihor Iskhakov. They were covering the protests on Monday when they were beaten and struck on the head by members of the elite Berkut police force.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and Reuters.

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by: Alex from: Canada
January 23, 2014 1:12 AM
Just so you know what are the peaceful protesters are in Ukraine.
Note that police is not armed with any weapons except of rubber sticks and shields.
This is from Ukraine and it is very different from what USA and EU media broadcasting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuO53xeZkm8

by: James Brown from: London
January 22, 2014 9:40 PM
The Yanukovich's regime is a terrorist! It beats people, it makes terror laws, it terrors people, it makes some people radical, it incites radical actions, and it kills people!

Now, facing death, people have no choice but to act in self-defense. They are forced to defend themselves. The regime should take all the responsibility.

Why didn't Yanukovich go to Maiden Square to meet and talk to people, if he thought he was right, If he thought he was not a gangster, if this government was really for people.

He is in deed coward! He is hiding behind the police force, and clings on power at the expense of the lives of Ukrainian people.
He is a liar and professionally two-faced. Yanukovich can today murder people, tomorrow sends wreathes for his victims.

Yanukovich is the first president, in history, after independence, with his hands full of the blood of Ukrainian people.

by: Anonymous
January 22, 2014 7:28 PM
There has been many protests recently in the world, but the most ludicrous of all is that of Ukraine. They agitate to join EU, cant they first develop their nation and then it will be EU to plead for them to join? Those protestors will not achieve much. The more they push for violence the close their nation will go the Syria way. Soon some jihadists will show up to help them on regime change etc. The leaders of the opposition have some faculties missing for sure. They prefer to be in EU to strengthening a nation independent of EU or Russia.
Will NATO send some bombs like was done to Libya to install a puppet at the door step of Russia? How is Syria working out? Ukraine protest leaders are a very confused bunch, I do not see EU going to war for regime change there on their behalf any time soon!

by: Martina from: US
January 22, 2014 8:55 AM
Alex, excellent comment...!!! I always read the VOA comments, far better than their "articles"

by: Rick Speer from: Budapest
January 22, 2014 7:41 AM
The Kyiv Post is down. I don't know for how long.

by: Alex from: Canada
January 22, 2014 3:06 AM


The problem is much simpler that all of westerners think.
There is a war for power and it is used by USA and EU to join Ukraine to EU.
Everything is paid by EU and USA. Those, so called protests last for two month at least. Where the money for protesters come from? They do not work they have families to feed and to dress, they do not have money and they do not get money from the government. They also do not have welfare system as in the west.

1. Klichko lived in Germany for the past 10 years. For 2013 he actually paid USA taxes which means that he lives there. He also has SSN ( social security number).
He is a boxer with 23 years of experience. 15 years in professional box. He does not have brains to act by himself. Have you ever seen a boxer with live brain cells after so many years in box.

2. Fascist Oleh Tyahnybok. He was awarded Waffen - SS and SS-Galitchina golden cross in 2011 while visiting Canada. He calls to get rid of none Ukrainians. On July 20, 2004, Tyahnybok was expelled from the Ukraine parliamentary after he made a speech in the Carpathian Mountains where he called Ukrainians "to take automatic guns and fight against Moskali ( Russians), Germans, Kikes ( Jews) and other scum"
Besides he demands to introduce in Ukrainian passport the paragraph called nationality so that non Ukrainians will not be accepted into government created jobs.

3. Current president represents Eastern Ukraine mafia.
4. Julia Timoshenko represent Central Ukraine mafia. Her previous boss was arrested and jailed in US for 10 years. (Pavel Lazarenko). She was his deputy and the first assistant. She was also charged with bribery when tried to bribe a general in Russian ministry of defense. She signed gas deal with Russia so that Russia would drop charges against her. This deal costs Ukraine extra $800 million a month.

All the other jerks are close to the west and central mafia groups.

What you are talking about? what values they are fighting for.
They are fighting for the power.
In Response

by: Alex from: Canada
January 23, 2014 1:06 AM
To virus,

I am not talking about young Ukrainians and those who actually want Ukraine to prosper. I am talking about those in power and those who are fighting for power. They are using those youngsters who wants better life. The depressing thing is that whoever wins the power will care about their own mafia group interests as it happened multiple times with those who used to be in power and today is so called opposition as well as with those who were opposition and currently in power. What I was trying to say that there are no good politicians in there. All of them have to be in jail.
In Response

by: Alex from: Canada
January 23, 2014 12:57 AM
for Lorna.

I am not outsider. I am from Ukraine. I was born there and lived more then 40 years there. I still have my sister and brother live there with my parents. My in laws are there as well. I vacation in Ukraine at least one month per year sometimes even more often.
In Response

by: Lorna from: Norway
January 22, 2014 5:23 PM
Alex from Canada, very nice comment from an outsider but not a true one about the underlying reasons of the protest, and given that you are only guessing I don't seem to like your confidence at all.
My best friend is Ukrainian and I happen to know a lot Ukrainian. It's true that people are divided in two groups, one supporting Russia and the other EU. The more intellectual ones, my friends all included are EU supports. Russia is almost a dictatorial country, with high corruption, human right repression and poor economy for its natural resources and area. On the cost of not becoming like Russia they are willing to accept a "worse" deal in economic terms, which supports the idea that they are fighting for ideals. There's not support of what so ever given to the protestants and we are actually working hard on getting at least some minimal support abroad. My friend's father is a doctor and is working for free to help protesters, because the ambulances most of the time end up to the police, where wounded protester are interrogated for hours. I know the opposite isn't worthy either, but half (or more) of Ukraine wants to get in the EU, it's not just about a party
In Response

by: Virus from: Kiev, Ukraine
January 22, 2014 6:43 AM
Very interesting information, and almost everything true. except for conclusions. The are always rightwing, leftwing, new fascists, nationalists, mafia in politics all around the world. Although country is divided into Russia-lovers and Europe-lovers it isn't the issue. Protesters don't care of opposition's power and ideas. They're young, hungry and angry looking for better life. The President and his mafia "family", corrupt government and lawmakers, unprofessional and biased police forces are hated by citizens all around the country. Even in president's mother region Donbas which he's been undressing and raping for years. Even his own backers from Party of Regions are not so happy. They lose their businesses. All recourses go to the "family".

by: Concerned
January 22, 2014 2:33 AM
The US must take more action. Petition the State Department to impose sanctions against the leadership:

http://www.change.org/petitions/u-s-department-of-state-enact-sanctions-against-ukraine-s-ruling-leadership-3

by: Rod Stoneball
January 21, 2014 7:41 PM
Russia isn't playing with Ukraine's affirmative action wannabes. Those nations don't like western style "acting up" or "civil disobedience" as is done in the West, the Eastern bloc doesn't play.

by: Michael Wind
January 21, 2014 3:10 PM
the reality is that now ukraine is part of russia,if the violence continues russia will send in troops to help restore the order russian style,just everybody relax and have a nice day,
In Response

by: Oleksandra
January 22, 2014 10:44 AM
Ukraine is a sovereign country. People do NOT want to become a part of Russia no matter how much money the president takes from Russia and what he promises to Putin in return.
In Response

by: Linda Knox from: Chicago
January 22, 2014 2:52 AM
The US and NATO et al promised Ukraine protection in exchange for Ukraine giving up its nuclear weapons. Seems that everyone has forgotten tht promise.... Has anyone seen Yanukovych since he was reported to have suffered a heart attack after his visit with Putin. His orders are disseminated via his web site. He is absent. Sounds like there already may have been an overthrow of the Ukrainian government by Putin's cronies.
In Response

by: Olga from: Ny
January 21, 2014 6:15 PM
Way it part of the Russia? It Independent Country, yet. If Ukraine is going to be Part of Russia tomorrow it will be Poland, Bulgaria and sun after the world …….. Russia has big appetites.

by: harold from: Florida
January 21, 2014 3:00 PM
There was once a time when this sort of talk preceded a Soviet incursion into the troubled nation at the 'invitation' of the besieged government.

I hope this isn't one of those cases.
In Response

by: arvin from: canada
January 21, 2014 4:51 PM
And what do think would happen if this were to happen in one of the States in the United States. The Feds would just stand by and watch the show?
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