News / Europe

Ukraine Protesters Fell Lenin Statue, Tell President 'You're Next'

People climb up to the top of a pedestal after a statue of Soviet state founder Vladimir Lenin was toppled by protesters during a rally organized by supporters of EU integration in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
People climb up to the top of a pedestal after a statue of Soviet state founder Vladimir Lenin was toppled by protesters during a rally organized by supporters of EU integration in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
Reuters
Anti-government protesters toppled a statue of Soviet state founder Vladimir Lenin in Ukraine's capital and attacked it with hammers on Sunday in a symbolic challenge to President Viktor Yanukovich and his plans for closer ties with Russia.

The gesture rejecting Moscow's historic influence over Ukraine came after opposition leaders told hundreds of thousands of demonstrators on Kyiv's Independence Square to keep up pressure on Yanukovych to sack his government.

The protesters are furious that the government decided last month to ditch a landmark pact with the European Union in favor of closer economic cooperation with Moscow, Ukraine's Soviet-era overlord.

(Check out our Storify snapshots of the protests in Ukraine at the bottom of this post)

Yanukovych's sudden tack towards Russia has provoked the biggest street protests since the 2004-5 Orange Revolution, when people power forced a re-run of a fraud-tainted election and thwarted his first run for the presidency.

A man with a sledgehammer smashes the toppled statue of Vladimir Lenin in central Kyiv, December. 8, 2013.A man with a sledgehammer smashes the toppled statue of Vladimir Lenin in central Kyiv, December. 8, 2013.
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A man with a sledgehammer smashes the toppled statue of Vladimir Lenin in central Kyiv, December. 8, 2013.
A man with a sledgehammer smashes the toppled statue of Vladimir Lenin in central Kyiv, December. 8, 2013.
”Yanukovych, you are next!” read a poster stuck on the plinth where the red granite statue of Lenin had stood. People hacked off chunks of the prostrate - and now headless - leader of the 1917 Bolshevik revolution to take home as souvenirs.

Cheered by the crowd, a woman planted an EU flag on the pedestal where the 3.5 meter high statue had stood since 1946.

Opposition leaders denied any link to its removal, clearly concerned that such an act could harm their cause. The spokesman of Ukrainian Prime Minister Mykola Azarov called the felling of the statue “barbarism,” Interfax news agency reported.

The authorities and protesters have confronted each other for weeks, raising fears for political and economic stability in the former Soviet republic of 46 million people.

The demonstrators have erected blockades to defend the central Independence Square - now transformed into a tent village, sustained by donations of food and clothing - from any police attempt to retake it. They are occupying key public buildings and on Sunday erected blockades and tents on roads in the government district.

”This is a decisive moment when all Ukrainians have gathered here because they don't want to live in a country where corruption rules and where there is no justice,” said Vitaly Klitschko, a reigning world heavyweight boxing champion and leader of the opposition Udar (Punch) party.

Supporters of EU integration are seen at a rally earlier in the day at Independence Square in central Kyiv, December 8, 2013.Supporters of EU integration are seen at a rally earlier in the day at Independence Square in central Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
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Supporters of EU integration are seen at a rally earlier in the day at Independence Square in central Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
Supporters of EU integration are seen at a rally earlier in the day at Independence Square in central Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
Ukraine's opposition accuses Yanukovych, who met Russian President Vladimir Putin on Friday, of preparing to take the country into a Moscow-led customs union, which they see as an attempt to recreate the Soviet Union.
 
‘Razor’s edge’

Yanukovych has said he decided to shelve the EU trade deal because it would have been too costly for Ukraine's struggling economy and the country needs more time to prepare. He says he is preparing a “strategic partnership” with Russia, but has not committed to joining the customs union.

We are on a razor's edge between a final plunge into cruel dictatorship and a return home to the European community,” jailed opposition leader Yulia Tymoshenko said in a message to Sunday's rally, read out by her daughter Yevhenia.

”Don't give in, not a step back, don't give up, the future of Ukraine is in your hands,” the message read.

Last weekend, riot police beat protesters and journalists, drawing EU condemnation and swelling protesters' ranks.

Klitschko, increasingly seen as a national leader-in-waiting, told Sunday's crowd that their protests must remain peaceful, adding: “We do not want to be kept quiet by a policeman's truncheon.” He demanded the release of political prisoners, punishment of those responsible for last weekend's crackdown, the resignation of Prime Minister Azarov's government and early presidential and parliamentary elections.

Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
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Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso urged Yanukovych by phone on Sunday to seek a dialogue with his opponents and to respect civil freedoms, the EU executive said. EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton will visit Kyiv this week to help to find a way out of the crisis, it said.

Interfax news agency said Yanukovych also discussed the situation with U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Kyiv and Moscow have both denied that Putin and Yanukovych discussed the customs union when they met in the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi, but further talks are planned for December 17.

Yanukovych and Putin, who regards Ukraine as strategically vital to Moscow's interests, are widely believed to have struck a bargain whereby Ukraine will get cheaper Russian gas and possibly credits in exchange for backing away from the EU.

Protest nucleus

A group of protesters, chanting “revolution,” started erecting tents and barricades near the government building after Sunday's rally, apparently aiming to halt normal government activity next week. Riot police stood guard nearby.

”We will stay till our demands are met and there is a change of government,'' said a 22-year-old man draped in a Ukrainian flag who gave his name as Serhiy. “We don't want to be under Russia's thumb.”

Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
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Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
Pro-European integration protesters attend a rally at Independence Square in Kyiv, December 8, 2013.
Independence Square, nucleus of the protest movement, is festooned with blue and yellow national flags and EU flags. People huddle around braziers to keep warm.

In a gesture sure to annoy Yanukovych, protesters hoisted a huge portrait of Tymoshenko onto a New Year tree, plastered with anti-government placards, that towers over the square.

The protest camp has been swelled by huge numbers arriving from Ukrainian-speaking western and central regions, where the opposition enjoys strong support.

A Tymoshenko ally, former interior minister Yuri Lutsenko, urged people in eastern Russian-speaking areas - the bedrock of Yanukovych's power - to join them. “We are the same people as you are, except they stole from you earlier,” he said.

Sales worker Sviatoslav Zaporozhets, 26, said the demonstrators were united by the desire for a change of government. “I don't want to go back to what my parents lived under in the Soviet Union,” he said. “When I am old, I want to live like people in Europe. I want to live in a normal country.”

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Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Sunny Enwerem from: Nigeria
December 08, 2013 7:14 PM
Russia Again!!!!!!
Yanukovych and Putin, who regards Ukraine as strategically vital to Moscow's interests, are widely believed to have struck a bargain whereby Ukraine will get cheaper Russian gas and possibly credits in exchange for backing away from the EU.?????in my country Nigeria we call this move bribery and corruption lol.

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