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UN: Civilian Casualties on the Rise in Afghanistan

FILE - An Afghan man carries an injured boy to a hospital after two roadside bombs struck the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Nov. 28, 2013.
FILE - An Afghan man carries an injured boy to a hospital after two roadside bombs struck the Achin district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Nov. 28, 2013.
Sharon Behn
A new United Nations report says the number of civilians dying in fighting in Afghanistan continues to rise. 2013 civilian deaths matched the record highs of 2011.

The U.N. said unrelenting armed conflict in Afghanistan killed almost 3,000 civilians and injured more than 5,500 during 2013.

Women and children increasingly bear the brunt of the violence, most of which is blamed on anti-government insurgents.

United Nations Assistance Mission special representative Jan Kubis said the targeted killings were a crime.

"There are groups that are boasting about killing civilians, are making statements about how good it is that civilians are being targeted and killed. These groups should understand this might border on war crimes," said Kubis.

The U.N. report released Saturday said homemade bombs planted by anti-government forces in places like parks, roads, and on bicycles, were the biggest killers of civilians.

A number of anti-government forces, including the Taliban, are operating in Afghanistan.

More civilians also are getting caught in the crossfire between militants and government forces, as Afghan security units try to gain control of the country.

And the U.N. said civilians were still being killed by international forces. But U.N. Human Rights Director Georgette Gagnon said those numbers paled in comparison.

"Of total civilian casualties, that's the total, we found that only three percent were attributed to international forces,  three percent of the total civilian casualties," said Gagnon.

The NATO International Security Assistance Force issued a statement saying it would work with Afghan forces to reduce civilian casualties.  More than 14,000 Afghan civilians have died since 2009. Thousands more have been injured.

Kubis said the number of civilian deaths was still rising so far in 2014.

International combat forces are due to leave Afghanistan by the end of this year.

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Comments
     
by: jimmy from: china
February 09, 2014 11:03 AM
people suffer a lot in the war. why do they like to chase power? it seems that fighting is the only way for them to achieve their goal. however, civilians get too much pains during this.


by: Haron from: Afghanistan, Kabul
February 09, 2014 7:44 AM
if we should have not mention Taliban as brothers we have not seen such days today. our government is in a wrong way. our president has guided the Afghan people and forces in stress and dangerous path.
all the people counting the seconds, Minutes, Hours, Days, Weeks and Finally month to terminate this corrupted government. after one and half month [54 days] we will end to a president whom wear traditional cloths. using simple words in press conferences like a baby at two years class.
these details have been connected to give more opportunities for Taliban to risen the Afghan civilian deaths.
if we had a president to criticize on savage Taliban. calling on people of Afghanistan as a family and Longfellow on International communities we would never seen such risen toll death and problems. from one side pressure are upgrading on NATO, ISAF, and US troops in Europe and United States to bring back their sons and family guardian [those males and females whom involved in military] to their homes. and from one side we watch such people in Afghanistan like Karzai's stimuli to accept Taliban and Pakistani Militants as brothers due their tribalism opinion really me and others are not willing to feel a better future. please Obama use your final talent to perish these problems or otherwise world could prepare overdose [poison] to eat and finish at once.
all the world accomplish their happiness but we [troops, workers, engineers, doctors, teachers, drivers and other tradespeople working] accomplish our sadness to the grave by death rising everyday.

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