News / Europe

UN Negotiators Agree to Modest Emissions Deal

U.S. climate envoy Todd Stern, right, speaks with Marcin Korolec, Poland’s environment minister, Warsaw, Nov. 23, 2013.U.S. climate envoy Todd Stern, right, speaks with Marcin Korolec, Poland’s environment minister, Warsaw, Nov. 23, 2013.
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U.S. climate envoy Todd Stern, right, speaks with Marcin Korolec, Poland’s environment minister, Warsaw, Nov. 23, 2013.
U.S. climate envoy Todd Stern, right, speaks with Marcin Korolec, Poland’s environment minister, Warsaw, Nov. 23, 2013.
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VOA News
United Nations negotiators have avoided a last-minute collapse of climate talks in Warsaw, approving a modest agreement that clears the way for a 2015 pact to fight global warming.

After two weeks of negotiations at the U.N. Climate Change Conference, delegates from more than 190 countries Saturday agreed on a deal apportioning targets for carbon emissions cuts between rich and poor nations. The deal also covers funding for countries vulnerable to climate change impacts.

The talks carried over into an extra day and only moved forward after negotiators replaced the word "commitments" in the text with the word "contributions." China and India said the word change could give them wider latitude when proposing emissions targets.

Developing nations like China and India insist that richer countries adopt stricter targets than they do. Western nations say they expect emerging economies to do their part to decrease global pollution.

The 2015 deal will be the first to bind all nations to curb damaging emissions created by burning coal, gas and oil.

Some information for this report was provided by AP and AFP.

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by: Alan MacDonald from: US Maine
November 24, 2013 9:57 AM
No progress is being made.

The reason is that there is no focus on the real problem.

Today the climate change movement was where the inequality movement was a decade ago.

There is no globally recognized, simple, and compelling attention (nor easy metric) to show where the real problem is and who is causing it.

With economic inequality a decade ago there was already a simple and easy to understand metric which could point the blame squarely at the global problem of inequality ---- this was the existing, but unpublicized figure of the GINI Coefficient of Income (and Wealth) Inequality ---which is a simple 0 to 1 figure showing full equality to total inequality (US is 0.5 very unequal)

When, ten years later, this simple data became available and publicized to all (not just economists and the CIA), the real effect, real diagnosis, and real blame of inequality started to be recognized and acted upon --- particularly by Occupy.

The GINI of Economic INEQUALITY had to be first known and then understood by the masses.

I know this because I was ranting about the GINI Coefficient of Income/Wealth Inequality a decade ago, when the metric existed but was not published nor understood.

As the UN and CIA figures for GINI of Economic Inequality got public traction, things like Occupy could use it to focus the problem and the blame not just on rich countries, but 'the rich' themselves -- the 1%.

However, today, the simple metric of a GINI of 'Energy' Inequality does not even exist.

Yes, sure, the UN COP talk knows that 'rich'/developed countries are vaguely the key to the problem of global warming because of their 'country' energy profligacy, BUT this is not the ACTUAL heart of the problem, any more than it was for Economic Inequality.

To make ANY progress on the Global Warming/Energy problem there absolutely has to be the clarity of a simple and published GINI Coefficient of ENERGY INequality of countries and classes within countries.

The UN needs to drive this essential first factor of solving the Global Warming/Energy existential problem.

Five years ago I implored Economist, Dean Baker (of FAIR) to build a GINI for Energy Inequality --- which has not been done --- but the UN should be the body that does this NOW.

Best luck on this essential, but side issue to understanding where the ruling-elite's Disguised Global Empire (DGE) is taking us and our world in this almost certain death-spiral.

I have shifted my own efforts entirely to exposing, educating, and confronting the DGE itself, rather than working on any of the many problems it CAUSES --- but I understand that many people are working on the 'symptom problems' that the Empire causes, of which 'global warming'/energy/climate-destruction is perhaps the prominent 'symptom problem' caused by the DGE.

Alan


by: mick from: chinderah
November 24, 2013 1:09 AM
China , India and Brazil are not going to cut back on emissions any time soon no matter what bullshit they tell the United nations committee, the reason being that they are developing nations and want all the comforts of home that we in the west have had for years IE television, washing machine vacuum cleaner, air conditioner and the list goes on, these items don't run on fresh air they need electricity and that's the problem the cheapest form of electricity is coal fired and China is building 160 coal fired power stations over the next 2 years and India about 60 so all these meetings are a waste of time and money not to speak of all the fuel burnt up flying all these parasites first class around the world to attend meetings on global warming

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