News / Middle East

UN, Iran Reach Nuclear Cooperation Deal

Head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, and IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, pose for a photo following their meeting in Tehran, Nov. 11, 2013.
Head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, and IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, pose for a photo following their meeting in Tehran, Nov. 11, 2013.
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VOA News
The United Nations and Iran have announced an agreement to cooperate on resolving outstanding issues regarding the country's nuclear program. Meanwhile, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said critics of a separate bid to limit Iran's nuclear activity need to let negotiations take their course.
 
Talks Monday between the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Yukiya Amano, and the Iranian nuclear chief, Ali Akbar Salehi, yielded a roadmap that will allow for wider U.N. inspections, including at a heavy water reactor site and a uranium mine.
 
The IAEA has been focused for two years on reaching a deal with Iran to gain greater access to documents regarding the country’s nuclear program, in addition to related personnel and sites.
 
Meanwhile, Kerry said on Monday during a visit to Abu Dhabi that critics, including Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, must recognize that world powers have not yet reached any agreement in their talks with Iran.
 
He said the United States, Britain, France, China, Russia and Germany were united on the plan they presented to Iranian negotiators Saturday in Geneva, but that Iran could not accept it at that time.
 
The powers are seeking to persuade Iran to suspend work that could allow it to build nuclear weapons in exchange for the easing of some sanctions against Iran.  Those negotiations are due to resume next week.
 
Israel, which calls Iran's nuclear drive a mortal threat, has warned against any deal that would leave some of Iran's nuclear fuel-making capacity intact while giving Tehran respite from sanctions.
 
Kerry said on Monday that it would not be responsible to ignore an opportunity to come to a verifiable agreement with Iran that would prevent it from developing nuclear weapons. 
 
There has been hope that the election of new moderate Iranian President Hassan Rouhani in June will lead to progress in both the talks with the IAEA and the group of six world powers.
 
Rouhani told his parliament on Sunday that Iran will not give up what it considers its nuclear rights, including the right to enrich uranium on Iranian soil, in any deal with international negotiators.

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by: Tomasita Alvarez from: Mexico
November 12, 2013 7:02 AM
Iranian imbecility has created the conditions for the powerful Sunni Arab States to virtually adopt Israel.


by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
November 12, 2013 1:05 AM
It must be a worthful first step for international society to be able to watch a reacter site and a uranium mine reflecting on Iranian ever stubborn attitude. The problem seems to be how extent sanctions should be relieved. Anyway it is most important to keep Iran staying on a negotiation table.


by: Change Iran Now from: USA
November 11, 2013 4:50 PM
Iran has only offered access to sites where there is no suspected nuke arms development. The sites identified as potential weapons development sites are off limits to UN Inspectors. Yet another example of empty promises to get sanctions relief in order to buy time and get funds to complete weapons production.


by: Sunny Enwerem from: Nigeria
November 11, 2013 12:30 PM
Which of the UN faction has Iran made a deal with because we all know what we have is an Un-united Nation and we know how easy it is to kick out UN inspectors when it suites,as far as thee Nuclear issue is going on with Iran I believe what ever deal is to be reach let their be an agreement on a military strike to create a change of regime if or when Iran deviates from what is agreed so as not to produce Nuclear weapons.


by: Chkuwuemeka Ukor from: lagos, Nigeria
November 11, 2013 11:44 AM
Am still saying that any nuclear materials the iranians has developed on nuclear must be destroy.what i saw on my net showing so far the ònes they have built must not be allowed to stand even.un convention at genevà must go in there to eradicate all roots and branches concerning any useless talks on that.make sure all these my comments must get to un convention at genevà now.i have seen it all so i dont want any repeatition again in this my life.Go and read my book="My Reincarnation".


by: Chukwuemeka Ukor from: Lagos, Nigeria.
November 11, 2013 11:03 AM
I still maintain that iranians must not be allowed to develop their nuclear programmes.they are threat to their neighbours.no one must. forget amaidneja's comment.that one alone rules out any concertion on them ro even talk about it in the first case.un have to close that matter not discuss it on the 20th Nov.


by: Godwin from: Nigeria
November 11, 2013 9:39 AM
Iran says it has an inalienable right to nuclear program. That is right, as it is with every other country of the world under the aegis of the United Nations considering all nations as free and sovereign. But when Mahmoud Ahmadinejad made it clear that Iran wished to wipe some sovereign countries out of the world map, the UN would only be showing itself as irresponsible and unresponsive to dangers to its members if it allows a rogue regime get away with such a threat where evidence of acrimonious hatred has been established, with the denial of the holocaust which the subsisting establishment views as the most heinous crime against humanity.

By so declaring, Iran made itself ineligible to be allowed to possess, manufacture, or use materials that can be used to produce weapons of mass destruction. To that end therefore, the right to uranium enrichment should be, if not already, withdrawn. A total dismantling of Iran’s nuclear program is the aim. It is either total removal or no deal. A moderation of Iran’s approach under Hassan Rouhani is because Iran may not as yet have its target. If it gets there – if it reaches its target – another North Korea-type of rogue regime would have been born; and a bolder and more impudent Iran, added to the drunken madness from North Korea, would render the planet a jamboree of the drunken gods, with everyone scampering in horror. A picture of survival of the fittest will simply trigger nuclear arms race – as every nation would prefer a readiness to strike back when struck.

On the other hand, we may be too quick in judging what Iran might be doing in its diplomacy. Israel's insistence on every option on the table notwithstanding, Iran may have been playing to the gallery to douse internal opposition or the far right/conservative politicians who will stop at nothing to see that Iran's national pride is not traded away. Wherein Israel's hardline stand makes it more difficult for Rouhani to play the game in his own way to achieve his goal. If Rouhani truly wanted a reprieve, he knows too well what the IAEA and the West's demand is. But that does not mean he would simply go on air and tell everybody that Iran has accepted to drop the nuclear program. Doing that in the face of Israel's vociferous threats and rejection only means yielding to Israel, a subservient position not even Saudi Arabia would wish that Iran takes.

So, is Kerry telling us to keep our fingers crossed so that what happens? Can Iran be trusted if it does not immediately satisfy the demand before it is let off the hook? Coming from a long way of mutual distrust, it cannot but be more arduous unless transparent.

In Response

by: Anonymous
November 11, 2013 4:42 PM
Lenghty yet invalid argument

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