News / Science & Technology

    Scientists 95% Certain Climate Change Is Man-made

    Scientists 95% Certain Climate Change is Man-made i
    X
    September 27, 2013 11:02 PM
    Scientists are more certain than ever before that the planet is warming and that humans are to blame. That’s the finding of a new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). As VOA’s Rosanne Skirble reports, the assessment will help inform policy makers and the public as they consider what action to take on climate change.]]
    Rosanne Skirble
    Scientists are more certain than ever that the planet is warming and that humans are to blame.

    That’s the finding of a new report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The assessment will help inform policy makers and the public as they consider what action to take on climate change.

    One hundred and ten governments adopted the scientific consensus that, “It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of observed warming since the mid-20th century.”

    Wake-up call

    At a news conference in Stockholm Friday, World Meteorological Organization Secretary General Michael Jarraud underscored the importance of the finding.



    “It should serve as another wake-up call that our activities today will have a profound impact on society, not only for us, but for many generations to come,” Jarraud said.  

    Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been losing mass and glaciers continue to shrink, the report says, calling the decrease in Arctic sea ice, “unprecedented.” The report notes the mean rate of sea level rise since the mid-19th century is higher than at any time in the previous 2,000 years.

    The international panel also probed the connection between extreme weather events and climate, says Brenda Ekwurzel, senior climate scientist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, who has worked with the panel's authors.  



    “This is a lot of cutting edge research, and the most we can say is that extreme events dealing with coastal flooding and extreme heat, [we have] very high confidence with these events being linked to climate change,” Ekwurzel said.

    Climate change deniers have tried to dismiss the science, citing a 15-year slowdown in atmospheric warming. That was downplayed in the report, which called it a natural phenomenon that masks on-going warming. The report reiterates the 2007 assessment that the warming trend is “unequivocal,” according to Ekwurzel.  

    “The 5th Assessment report has really notched up the confidence level, that greater than 95 percent confidence of the likelihood that the warming that happened on this planet between 1951 and 2010, more than half of it is due to human activities,” she said.
        
    Those human activities include the burning of fossil fuels in factories, buildings and cars, which emit heat-trapping gasses.

    Moving forward

    Past IPCC reports have set the stage for world agreements like the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 climate treaty signed and ratified by 192 nations that expired in 2012. The United Nation’s top climate official says the new IPCC report will help move climate talks forward.     



    “That policy response will have to end up in a global agreement that is going to be legally based and applicable to all countries and will be adopted in 2015. And for that, governments are already working,” Christiana Figueres said.  

    While the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is sometimes criticized as appearing to be too conservative in its predictions, Figueres says this report is right on the mark.

    “Everything that we thought about climate change has been underestimated, that we will have much faster and much more intense effects from the growing concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere," she said. "So it’s a very sobering message that calls for a more invigorated and accelerated policy response to address that.”

    Government leaders and climate experts will get an opportunity to do that at the next round of climate negotiations in Warsaw, Poland in November.

    Friday’s IPCC report will be followed next year by reports on the impact of climate change and what can be done about it.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: mememine69 from: Toronto
    October 26, 2013 3:03 PM
    Why are YOU news editors reporting that my kids are doomed to their CO2 deaths in a CO2 climate crisis that YOU say WILL happen when science has NEVER agreed anything beyond "could be" a crisis?
    Only news editors and politicians believe in this Reefer Madness of Climate Blame and your 30 plus years of needless CO2 panic is for history to judge as a war crime.

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    September 30, 2013 1:21 AM
    I am sure they are IPCC members themselves those who are the most aware of uncertainty of their announcement and ineffectiveness to have any governments conduct any countermeasures against would-be climate changes and global warming. USA left Kyoto-protocol. It is said that it is only Japan that actually reduced Co2 discharge.

    by: km
    September 29, 2013 12:20 PM
    The idiot scientists should learn how a vegetable greenhouse works before publishing their nonsense to the world.
    If CO2 reflects back some outgoing radiation then it must also reflect out to space some incoming radiation.
    How long has this farce been going on! The climate scientists should be sacked and not allowed to teach science to children. They are unaware of the meaning of the word science. These buffoons are unaware that science does not mean speculation!

    by: Al Bore from: Earth
    September 29, 2013 9:41 AM
    Science has NEVER agreed or said their own 30 year old crisis WILL be an inevitable crisis, only "could be" and "likely" and.... Deny that!
    Big Oil doesn't feed us deniers, it's the fact that you believers are saying a crisis WILL happen when science has never agreed on anything beyond "could be" a crisis from Human CO2. WHO is the fear monger here again? If you remaining believers could convince the the millions of people in the global scientific community to agree a crisis is "inevitable" instead of "possible", then this costly debate to "save the planet" would end instantly. But fear and fear alone is the only motivator you doomers know. You climate blamers didn't love the planet, you just hated humanity itself and consider this Liberalism's own Iraq War and did Bush condemn billions of helpless children to an exaggerated crisis just to make sure they stayed environmentally aware and turned the lights out more often. Your Reefer Madness of a 30 year old "maybe" crisis is unsustainable so get ahead of the curve like Occupy has:
    *Occupywallstreet now does not even mention CO2 in its list of demands because of the bank-funded and corporate run carbon trading stock markets ruled by politicians.
    *Canada killed Y2Kyoto with a freely elected climate change denying prime minister and nobody cared, especially the millions of scientists warning us of unstoppable warming (a comet hit).
    We need liberals who doubt question and challenge authority not goose step obediently to an authority that condemns the entire planet earth.

    by: Kitagawa Keikoh from: Daikanyama, T-site
    September 27, 2013 9:06 PM
    Please give me an answer for the following questions.

    1. Why dose sea level rise by melting floating ices?
    Have you ever seen a glass of water with ices?
    Does the water level rise after melting all ices?

    2. What is wrong with increasing sea level just some centimeters during tens of years?
    Will that struck us suddenly like tsunami?
    Are people living at coast too fool to make any countermeasure against that change?
    In Response

    by: Dave from: Tacoma
    September 29, 2013 5:33 PM
    Your using logic and reason to arrive at some decent questions that deserve to be answered but the truth is Global Climate Change is not really about the environment or any so called attempt at saving mother earth. The reason for the movement is "money", It is a big money grab by the worlds governments to generate more cash flow so they can get more control and go on and on and on. We do not and never will control the temperature of the planet.

    by: Manda Ginjiro from: Minami, Namba
    September 27, 2013 8:45 PM
    Why do you media use video clips of smoke coming out from a funnel in order to describe climate change due to CO2? That is just vapor , steam, not CO2 !!

    They think most people are foolish and do not know anything.
    In Response

    by: Yoshi from: Sapporo
    September 30, 2013 4:53 AM
    Does not the amount of Co2 discharge parallel to the amount of white funnel? Eventhough white funnel is actually vapor, does not it represent exhaust gas as easily noticed by general people? Do reporters really think people foolish?

    by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
    September 27, 2013 8:20 PM
    The tectonic breakup and the collusion of Africa and Eurasian plates resulted in forming dry land between north Africa and southern Europe in 12-5 million years ago. The Mediterranean area was filled with water from north Atlantic ocean through the Straight of Gibralter in about 5.33 million years ago. The water flow from Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea happened in a very short time of two years. The super volcanic eruption of Yellowstone, U.S.A. in about 630,000 years ago resulted in the formation of the Island Park Caldera, Idaho. This volcanic eruption caused the extinction of several species of animals including dinosaurs. North Africa became drier in about 75,000 B.C. and this dry spell in north Africa was a contributory for the human population reduced to the verge of extinction. The eruption of Toba in Sumatra, Indonesia in 75,000-72,000 B.C was one of the two worst catastrophic events in human history that reduced the human population to the verge of extinction reducing the human population to about 10,000 humans. This volcanic eruption caused the volcanic winter cooling the earth for a millennium reducing the temperature from 3-15C depending on the elevation. The Mousterian Pluvial is an extended period of wet and rainy climate in north Africa from 52,000-32,000 years ago. The Sahara desert area was a giant inland sea in about 20,000 B.C. at the end of the Second Mousterian Pluvial of extended period of wet and rainy whether in North Africa. The last glacial period was in 18,00-15,000 B.C.. the sea level was about 361-394 feet below the present sea level indicating the rise of sea level consumed several low lying areas under water. Temporary global chilling occurred in 9000 B.C. because of the southward move of Gulf Stream resulting in ice over Europe. The Ice Age ended in 8000 B.C.. The period from 8000-3000 B.C. was a period of warm climate known as the Atlantic Period. the world sea level began to rise due to melting of ice in Antarctica. Warming in Asia began and the glaciers receded in North America. There was no more glaciers in Wisconsin, U.S.A. The receding glaciers formed the rock formations known as Old Man of the mountain in New Hampshire, U.S.A.. Post glacial warming started around the world. Flooding occurred in several low lying area in several regions of the world. during this period about 40 million animals vanished. Studies conducted in polar ice revealed a series of seven massive volcanic eruptions from 7911- 7090 B.C. which lowered the temperature around the world for several centuries. Are the scientists 95% sure that the above climatic changes are human made?
    In Response

    by: Manda Ginjiro from: Minami, Namba, Osaka
    September 28, 2013 8:16 PM
    Make it short, if you want someone to read.

    by: Dr. B from: Sacramento CA
    September 27, 2013 1:43 PM
    wow... 95%...??? hey UN... just pass a resolution condemning the US and Israel... - you clowns!!!

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