News / Middle East

    Ban to Tell UN Syria Situation Grave and Deteriorating

    Syrian refugee children play with clay after workers end work at Al Zaatri refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, September 2, 2012.
    Syrian refugee children play with clay after workers end work at Al Zaatri refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, September 2, 2012.
    VOA News
    United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon plans to tell the U.N. General Assembly the humanitarian situation in Syria is grave and deteriorating.

    Ban speaks to the Assembly Tuesday, where he is expected to appeal for more global funding for U.N. relief efforts in Syria and neighboring countries housing refugees.

    A Ban spokesman says the U.N. chief understands this is a time of austerity in the world, but also a time of great need.

    Registered Syrian Refugees by Country

    Turkey:      50,227
    Jordan:     39,600
    Lebanon: 35,686
    Iraq:           9,053
     
    Source: UNHCR
    The United Nations says 100,000 Syrians fled the country in August, the highest monthly total since the conflict began last year.

    U.N. refugee agency spokeswoman Melissa Fleming says 235,000 Syrians live in refugee camps in Jordan, Iraq, Lebanon, and Turkey.

    But officials say the true number of refugees may be much higher because not everyone has registered with camp authorities.

    Also Tuesday, Syrian television reported that President Bashar al-Assad said he supports the work of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Syria as long as it remains "impartial and independent."

    Assad met with ICRC head Peter Maurer in Damascus.

    Maurer is on a three-day visit to discuss ways to deliver humanitarian aid to Syrians caught up in the civil war.  The Red Cross said earlier Maurer would address the "rapidly deteriorating humanitarian situation" and the difficulties which the ICRC and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent face in reaching people affected by the country's violence.

    • This image made from video provided by Shaam News Network (SNN) and accessed by the Associated Press on Tuesday, September 4, 2012 purports to show people walking through rubble after shelling in Idlib, Syria.
    • Residents inspect the damage after what was said to be an air raid by Syrian government forces near Azaz, September 3, 2012.
    • A Syrian child stands next to rebel fighters checking a house that was damaged in bombing by government forces in Marea, on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria, September 4, 2012.
    • A Syrian rebel fighter prepares his AK-47 before going on patrol in Marea, on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria, September 4, 2012.
    • A view shows the wreckage after a car bomb exploded in the Jaramana district of southeast Damascus September 3, 2012, in this photograph released by Syria's national news agency SANA.
    • Civilians wait to receive food rations in the Bab Al-Salam refugee camp in Azaz. At the Azaz-Kilis crossing, Syrians described dire conditions for refugees still trapped on the other side of the border.
    • Syrian Hamzah Abu Bakri, displays portraits of his brothers who were killed last week while standing by their vegetable shop in Aleppo, Syria, September 2, 2012.
    • Boys play on a Syrian military tank (destroyed during fighting with the rebels), in Azaz, September 2, 2012.
    • A Syrian refugee hangs clothes to dry at Zaatari Refugee Camp, in Mafraq, Jordan, September 2, 2012.
    • Syrian barbers who fled their homes shave the heads of other displaced men at the Bab Al-Salameh border crossing, in hopes of entering one of the refugee camps in Turkey.
    • A civilian pushes a baby stroller containing his belongings as he flees the El Edaa district in Aleppo, September 2, 2012.

    The Red Cross said earlier that Maurer would address the "rapidly deteriorating humanitarian situation" and the difficulties which the ICRC and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent face in reaching people affected by the country's violence.

    On Monday, Syrian activists said a government air strike killed at least 18 people in a residential area in the country's north, while five people died in car bomb blast in a Damascus suburb.

    The activists said women and children were among those killed in the air strike in the town of al-Bab. They said other people were feared dead under the rubble of damaged homes.

    The car bombing in the Damascus district of Jaramana also wounded at least 27 people.

    On the diplomatic front, international peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi said in an interview with the BBC that he faces a nearly impossible task in trying to resolve Syria's 18-month conflict.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: katia from: UK
    September 04, 2012 9:56 PM
    STOP ISLAMIC IMMIGRATION TO EUROPE!!!

    PLEASE!!!

    by: Kafantaris from: USA, Ohio
    September 04, 2012 4:51 PM
    Sending U.N. envoy Brahimi to Syria is utter foolishness in the midst of aerial bombings and intense ground fighting.
    Indeed, even if peace was still plausible, it would mean loss of power for Assad and his henchmen -- or their answering for war crimes, as they had reached the point of no return to civilized governance long ago. Their only hope now is to fight the rebellion and carve out a chunk of Syria for their refuge.
    The Iranian regime is absolutely determined to help Assad do this -- which is precisely why the path through Syria has become our gateway to Iran.
    And let us not fool ourselves: That regime will have to be confronted militarily, sooner or later. The time to do so is now when we have other nations by our side going into Syria.
    As for Russia and China, these two are reasonable opponents and will do what is best for them -- and the rabid Iranian regime is not much better for them as it is for the rest of us. And like us, Russia and China have given up all hope of taming it.
    It is foreseeable then that Russia and China will again watch as we spend our blood and treasure to knock out another troublesome regime in the world.
    A more pressing question is whether we have any stomach left for another war. Assad and the Iranian regime are betting that we don't.
    But then so did Saddam and Gaddafi.
    In Response

    by: John
    September 04, 2012 10:12 PM
    Frankly, I don't think the US needs another war. I'd put the money into synthetic oil plants, so you could get out of the Middle East entirely. Still, I'm not an American.

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