News / Asia

China 'Heard Ping' That Could Be Missing Plane

Chinese patrol ship Haixun 01 is pictured during a search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, in the south Indian Ocean April 5, 2014, in this photo courtesy of China News Service.
Chinese patrol ship Haixun 01 is pictured during a search for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, in the south Indian Ocean April 5, 2014, in this photo courtesy of China News Service.
China's official news agency is reporting what could be a breakthrough in locating the Malaysia Airlines jet missing for nearly a month. 

A Chinese ship, searching about 1,600 kilometers northwest of Perth, Australia, says it heard multiple pings that could have come from the missing plane's flight recorder.

The Xinhua news agency reported the Chinese patrol ship Haixun 01 in the southern Indian Ocean detected a pulse signal on the frequency 37.5 kilohertz.

A Chinese Central Television (CCTV) reporter on board the ship, in a live broadcast, said the pings - one second apart - were detected by a hydrophone deployed from the vessel both Friday and Saturday.
 
China's Maritime Search and Rescue Agency is quoted by Xinhua as saying there is no confirmation that the pulse originated from the flight recorder, or "black box," of missing flight MH370.

The Chinese report was not immediately confirmed by authorities in China, Malaysia or Australia. But aviation experts in the United States and elsewhere say it is conceivable that such a signal could have come from the plane, which is presumed to have gone down at sea with the loss of all 239 people on board.

Search planes and boats have been crisscrossing a large area of the southern Indian Ocean off the western coast of Australia, where the plane is believed to have gone down. An analysis of some of the last known data signals from the jet, monitored by a satellite, pointed search teams to that remote stretch of ocean.

The search for signals from the Boeing 777's flight recorders has been intense during the past week, since the batteries powering the emergency beacons could be exhausted at any time.
 
A military ship from Australia and another from Britain, both equipped with underwater sensor technology, also began hunting for the black box signals on Friday.

Malaysian and Australian officials offered only pessimistic forecasts this past week, saying that, without any confirmed recovery of debris from the plane, the mystery of what happened may never be known.

Australia's prime minister has called the search for the plane the most complex such undertaking in history.

The plane disappeared during the early stages of a scheduled flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, in the early hours of March 8.

Steve Herman

A veteran journalist, Steve Herman is VOA's Southeast Asia Bureau Chief and Correspondent, based in Bangkok.

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Comments page of 2
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by: Andre from: Canada
April 06, 2014 8:33 AM
2/3 of the passengers were Chinese nationals.

by: kat from: sa tx
April 06, 2014 7:17 AM
I would just like to thank every person from every country involved in this search. No one had to do it, it was all voluntary. There are still kind hearted people in this world. Thank you world, my prayers go out to each of you.
,
In Response

by: Jonathan huang from: Canada
April 06, 2014 4:03 PM
You are wrong, the Chinese government must do the rescue and search for so many Chinese nationals on board!
I am proud my country never gave up even after 4 weeks without success. This is a responsible government supposed to behave.

by: Eli from: Ghana
April 06, 2014 5:33 AM
Tony... show some respect

by: Anonymous
April 06, 2014 3:21 AM
They won't find it..
In Response

by: Roscoe_Rules from: Blaine, Wa.
April 06, 2014 4:09 PM
I am very curious as why you take this position?

by: Roscoe_Rules from: Blaine, Wa.
April 06, 2014 12:22 AM
Yes China has done a commendable and tireless job in searching for their people. Yes they have had support though that equally deserve credit as well, like Australia.

Great work Republic of China, and I hope that this locates what the lazy Malaysian government have mismanaged.

by: muia from: kenia arms
April 06, 2014 12:21 AM
wat age are we in.a lost plane for 1 full
moon.China pleaaase do it!

by: Muhammad Thani from: Daura Nigeria
April 05, 2014 11:27 PM
Boeing should confirm or repute the claim considering the reported frequency and the signal interval does it look flausible? Also the coordinates of Haisun 01 could be used to technically narrow down the search area. May Allah make this search end soon.

by: AHMED UMAR from: nigeria
April 05, 2014 5:28 PM
this is an awakening call.for other vessels. chinise are doing a great work.
In Response

by: michael from: china
April 06, 2014 5:56 AM
THANKs for yr positvie reply for china ‘s action

by: Tony from: USA
April 05, 2014 4:45 PM
LOL... China - filthy diseased country - heard some Ping Pong... LOL
In Response

by: Eli from: Ghana
April 06, 2014 5:36 AM
U r very funny but hey show some respect to China
In Response

by: Kocy Ouyang from: China
April 06, 2014 4:36 AM
Chinese are doing their best effort to locate the plane.Please show your respect...
In Response

by: Roscoe_Rules from: Blaine, Wa.
April 06, 2014 12:24 AM
What a brainless posting.
In Response

by: fenix from: china
April 05, 2014 9:18 PM
hehe,what a funny guy it is.

by: Jonathan Huang from: Canada
April 05, 2014 3:34 PM
Thanks to the Chinese Navy! You did great job. Can't wait to retrieve the black box and to see what really happened to this plane.
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