News / USA

Russia: No Asylum Request From Snowden

Russia's Federal Migration Service chief Konstantin Romodanovsky is seen at the agency's headquarters in Moscow, in this January 26, 2012, file photo.Russia's Federal Migration Service chief Konstantin Romodanovsky is seen at the agency's headquarters in Moscow, in this January 26, 2012, file photo.
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Russia's Federal Migration Service chief Konstantin Romodanovsky is seen at the agency's headquarters in Moscow, in this January 26, 2012, file photo.
Russia's Federal Migration Service chief Konstantin Romodanovsky is seen at the agency's headquarters in Moscow, in this January 26, 2012, file photo.
VOA News
Russian officials say they have not received a formal request for asylum from fugitive U.S. intelligence leaker Edward Snowden.
 
The head of Russia's Federal Migration Service, Konstantin Romodanovsky, said Saturday that the agency has not yet received an application from Snowden.
 
Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov echoed those comments Saturday at a security meeting in Kyrgyzstan, saying the government is not in contact with the former U.S. intelligence contractor.
 
Snowden, accused of leaking information about classified U.S. National Security Agency surveillance programs, is currently in the transit zone of Moscow’ Sheremetyevo airport - where he has been in limbo for three weeks after U.S. officials revoked his passport.
 
Edward Snowden at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport July 12, 2013, with Sarah Harrison of Wikileaks on the left side of the photo.Edward Snowden at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport July 12, 2013, with Sarah Harrison of Wikileaks on the left side of the photo.
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Edward Snowden at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport July 12, 2013, with Sarah Harrison of Wikileaks on the left side of the photo.
Edward Snowden at Moscow's Sheremetyevo airport July 12, 2013, with Sarah Harrison of Wikileaks on the left side of the photo.
On Friday, Snowden met with human rights activists at the airport, telling them he is seeking temporary asylum in Russia until he can safely travel to Latin America, where three countries, Bolivia, Nicaragua and Venezuela, have offered him asylum.
 
The U.S. criticized Russia for allowing Snowden to meet the activists. White House spokesman Jay Carney said Friday that Russia is giving Snowden a "propaganda platform," which he said runs counter to Russia's declaration of neutrality in the matter.
 
The United States wants to bring Snowden back home to face trial for leaking U.S. secrets.
 
If Russia were to grant him asylum, the effects on the U.S.-Russia relationship would be significant, exacerbating existing tensions between the two nations.
 
Russian President Vladimir Putin has said Snowden would have to stop activities "aimed at harming" Russia's "American partners," before his bid for refuge in Russia would be considered.
 
Putin and U.S. President Barack Obama discussed the Snowden case by phone Friday, along with other issues. No details of their talks have been released.

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Comments
     
by: Jack in the boxer from: THAILAND
July 14, 2013 5:54 PM
it's high time for someone to raise the question about Snowden's credibility and motives, raising the possibility he is not who they want us to believe he is:
http://www.cia-news.com/is-edward-snowden-a-double-agent/


by: Talisman from: Australia
July 14, 2013 12:43 AM
Had he betrayed the "new Soviet Republic" in the manner he did the U.S.A. and its' allies, he would have been tortured and excecuted a.s.a.p. So much for the whistle blowers re. traitors, and their crowing over freedom do betray their country at the drop of a hat, all ending up apealing to dictators to give them refuge. Refuge in slums run by gangsters where the freedoms they insist on exercising are met with the dungeon and the rope.


by: Gennady from: Russia, Volga Region
July 13, 2013 8:56 PM
It looks like I was right in my prediction over Mr. Snowden in my earlier comment in Russia Watch on the VOA.
1) Mr. Snowden, an idealist as he has been, is a realist enough to choose the country for his asylum. Take just recent ruling of the court of law in Putin’s Russia when Mr. Magnitsky being dead for four years was pronounced guilty after uncovering malignant corruption. Take sucked out of fingers charges against Mr. Navalny, an opposition activist.
2) The FSB (federal security government), being vicious to the USA in domestic monopolized TV broadcasting for millions brainwashed Russians, tries to look ready for cooperation with the USA, particularly after the government has already got all valuable information from Mr. Snowden. Now Mr. Snowden isn’t needed any more and is just a “hot potato”. So his asylum requests aren't encouraged.

In Response

by: mike jaeger from: usa
July 14, 2013 12:20 AM
Death or worse are the risks faced by Mr. Snowden concerning his work for and now in opposition to the US Prism data base program - operated by the NSA. He has legitimate grounds and much support for his serious concern and well considered reasons for his actions. How did the land of the free... the home of the brave become the dark fear loving nation we are today?


by: wavettore from: USA
July 13, 2013 1:12 PM
In regard to this surveillance program the public opinion is split once again between those who respect themselves and their freedom and those who instead live in fear, look for protection and welcome the leash of their master.

It is also about a certain culture that had been slave since ancient Egypt.

http://www.wavevolution.org/en/freethinking.html


by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
July 13, 2013 9:39 AM
What else you can expect from Putin? Nobody can straighten the tail of a dog.


by: Johnson Okwu Kamalu from: Port Harcourt. Nigeria
July 13, 2013 7:53 AM
Edward Snowden is an American and not a Russian. So Russia should leave Americans sort their problems.

In Response

by: germanicus62 from: Washington
July 23, 2013 9:33 PM
So he lets US citizens know that the USA has been secretly spying on millions of phone records of US citizens. And that makes the Government the good guy and Snowden the bad guy? Of course Putin doesn't want a human rights advocate like him in Russia. He may start looking Putin's record. So now Putin and the USA have a lot in common. That's sad.

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