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US Aviator Fails to Find Remains of Korean War Comrade

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A highly decorated American pilot from the Korean War prepared to leave Pyongyang after failing to locate the remains of his fallen comrade.

Thomas Hudner returned to North Korea last week to try to find the remains of his wingman Jesse Brown, who crashlanded over a battlefield in December 1950. Brown was the U.S. Navy's first black aviator.

At the time, Hudner tried to land and save him, but failed. Hudner was awarded a Medal of Honor for his effort.

Hudner was part of a private American search team given permission by North Korean authorities to look for Brown's remains at Hagaru-ri at the foot of the Chosin reservoir.

But bad weather in the remote area of North Korea where Brown died prevented the search.



The private visit by Hudner and former U.S. Marine Richard Bonelli is the first attempt at repatriating remains of U.S. servicemen since a joint U.S.-North Korean government agreement of 2011 failed to be implemented.

Nearly 8,000 Americans are still missing in action from the Korean War.

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