News / Asia

    US, China Split Over More Active Japanese Military

    US, China Split Over More Active Japanese Militaryi
    X
    July 08, 2014 3:58 PM
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel are in Beijing for talks with their Chinese counterparts on economic and military issues. As VOA State Department Correspondent Scott Stearns reports, Washington and Beijing disagree over Japan's military taking a more active role in conflicts outside its borders.

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew are in Beijing for talks with their Chinese counterparts on economic and military issues.  Washington and Beijing disagree over Japan's military taking a more active role in conflicts outside its borders.

    Secretary Kerry comes to this Strategic and Economic Dialogue facing Chinese and South Korean concerns about a more active Japanese military.

    Ending a 1945 ban on fighting abroad, Japanese soldiers will now work more closely with other armies in training and peacekeeping.

    Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said he is protecting Japanese citizens. "By being better prepared, it is possible to deter those who look to go to war against Japan," he said.

    In Washington, U.S. State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki welcomed the move. "In order for it to be successful, it Is important they move forward in a transparent manner.  But we have an open dialogue with Japan about a range of issues, including our security cooperation and partnerships, and so we expect that to be the case," she stated.

    But Chinese President Xi Jinping and South Korean President Park Geun-hye say a more active Japanese military could undermine regional stability. 

    "We demand that Japan earnestly respect the reasonable security concerns of its Asian neighbors.  It must not harm China's national sovereignty and security, and it must not damage regional peace," said Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei.

    Yonsei University Professor John Delury said Chinese and South Korean opposition to the move complicates U.S. policy in the region. "They will try to find some way to present a sort of a united front against Prime Minister Abe in Japan.  And of course, that puts the United States in an awkward position," he said.

    Especially as China and South Korea each have territorial disputes with Japan.  American Enterprise Institute analyst Michael Auslin said it is an opportunity for China. "China has done everything it can to abet a split in Korean-Japanese relations.  And I think the two sides, Seoul and Tokyo, are recognizing that you may not like who your neighbor is, but you have got to live with your neighbor, especially when you have got a much more threatening neighbor," he noted.

    South Korea said it will never allow Japanese forces to affect the Korean peninsula without its consent, urging Tokyo to pursue its new military posture only within the framework of its alliance with the United States.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments page of 2
        Next 
    by: JR from: NYC
    July 10, 2014 6:26 AM
    China just blinked!

    by: Jay from: Nevada
    July 09, 2014 3:35 PM
    If the German government denied the holocaust, and if they enshrined and honored Heinrich Himmler as a great war hero, and if they taught two generations of Germans that their atrocities never happened and that their role in wwii was to liberate and bring prosperity to the world-

    If Germany did all that, would you be comfortable with them re-arming and taking a more active military role????

    That is exactly what is happening in Japan today

    by: NG from: Canada
    July 09, 2014 12:40 AM
    Michael Auslin from American Enterprise Institute said China abet a split in Korean-Japanese relations, Michael Auslin is really an idiot. China and Korean suffered a lot due to cruelty,brutality and atrocity of Japanese Fascists during WWII, japan also attack Pearl Harbor of US in WWII, can this Michael Auslin remember this history? who abet who? Idiot Michael Auslin.

    Japanese fascists are true threat for Asia and the world, learn what Japanese have done in China, Korean and other Asian countries during WWII, idiot Mr. Auslin.
    In Response

    by: derpderp from: here
    July 09, 2014 5:52 PM
    LoL You act like China hasn't slaughtered 60 million of it's own people and spread huge amounts of violence and war crime while spreading communism since then.

    You bring up Korea, yet forget that China once attacked to spread communism there. They are the very reason WE NOW HAVE TO DEAL WITH KIM'S CONSTANT THREATS TO NUKE EVERYBODY AND HAVE TWO FREAKING KOREAS!!!

    Please, that "Japan beat us up" line is getting old. Especially when Red China has proven what they would do whit an active army.

    by: Anonymous
    July 09, 2014 12:33 AM
    Time to put past behind and move forward. Korea will be much better off working with Japan than China. How could Koreans forget China's entanglement during the Korean war! China is the very reason there remains two Koreas. Yes, Japan did by occupying Korea and it was certainly not pretty. I grew up hearing about what the Japan did in Korea as a child but it ended in 1945 so learn from it and move on. But to think that China can ever be a friend of Korea is a hugh mistake! China only wants what China wants and they do not give a damn about anyone else! So, Korea really needs to think very carefully before going to bed with China.
    In Response

    by: Lifejourney from: here
    July 19, 2014 4:01 PM
    Are you telling me that Japanese militarism today is for peaceful mean? No one is attacking Japan, why expanding its military power, after all, the US is its protector with nuclear umbrella. What do the Japanese have to be scared off? Had China attacked Japan? The only attacker I've seen here is the Japanese attacked and kill the Chinese and the rest of Asians by the millions.

    by: allen from: America
    July 08, 2014 9:26 PM
    China is so afraid of Japan. China still gets nightmares what happened on WW2. And now China want to be like Japan back on WW2 today.
    In Response

    by: Robert from: Canada
    July 08, 2014 10:09 PM
    Your comment shows pinoys think like a labor. Makes no sense on a geopolitical scale.

    by: Ping
    July 08, 2014 8:27 PM
    Any one trusts
    Japan to be peaceful is an idiot!
    In Response

    by: pits from: Makati
    July 09, 2014 7:22 AM
    anyone who trust china is worst than an idiot..
    In Response

    by: NO MADE IN CHINA from: JAPAN
    July 09, 2014 12:41 AM
    China is a cry wolf. NO MADE IN CHINA. YES WE CAN.

    by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
    July 08, 2014 7:26 PM
    Japan's move puts USA in a difficulty situation. First, if USA sides with Japan, it will antagonise another Asian ally, South Korea which has historical hostility towards Japan. Moreover, small Asian nations like Philippines also fear Japan's rearmament. Second, if USA dose not side with Japan, Japan will feel that it lacks the capability of defending itself. It is unlikely in the immediate future, Japan will improve its relationship with China. It takes two to tangle. China is experiencing an upsurge of nationalism. USA has to play the game with utmost delicacy.
    In Response

    by: Mark from: Philippines
    July 09, 2014 4:03 AM
    Actually what you said is quite the opposite...Philippines don't fear japan and we are happy on what japan rearmament plan to help us protect our territory from china...

    http://globalnation.inquirer.net/107471/ph-hails-japans-move-to-expand-military-role
    In Response

    by: Muzika from: Helmsworth
    July 08, 2014 10:51 PM
    1st and foremost Philippines(one of the worst country victimized by Japan) welcomed with open arms Japan's rearmament. AFAIK it's president even went to Japan personally to show support.

    Second the US already side with both Japan and South Korea. Both Japan and Korea have only issues with trust but they don't have any disputes hence I don't think it's a big issue of either country if US supports Japan or vice versa.

    by: Delmonte from: DC
    July 08, 2014 6:30 PM
    Abe never admitted Japan invasions against all Japan's neighbors incl USA and Russia. Pearl Harbor attack was called Japan self defense, sex slavery was the women voluntary prostitution.
    Today, warmonger Obama cluelessly makes use of Abe who in turn makes use of that idiot will be shocked but too late, to reals that it as made such a huge mistake for Amercan.

    by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
    July 08, 2014 6:28 PM
    It is time that Japan make constitutional changes in the Article 8 of their constitution so that they can rise up to the military challenges of China. If Japan did not make the necessary constitutional changes, Chinese military threats will grow. Japan should be ready for any Chinese military adventure. Japan cannot rely on the US to protect their country. The future of Japan is in its own hands.

    by: Greg Williams
    July 08, 2014 6:10 PM
    Japan today is not the same Japan of the 1940's....it is becoming one of the worlds leading countries and it needs to take on a bigger role in it security and helping it's neighbors
    Comments page of 2
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