News / Asia

US: China's Sea Claims Are Ambiguous, Problematic

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, second from right, wave to journalists as they visit to Badaling Great Wall of China in Beijing, China, July 8, 2014.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, and U.S. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew, second from right, wave to journalists as they visit to Badaling Great Wall of China in Beijing, China, July 8, 2014.
VOA News

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is in Beijing for annual talks between senior Chinese and U.S. officials expected to focus on China's territorial disputes with its neighbors.

The United States officially takes no sides in the rival claims in the South China Sea. But a senior U.S. official traveling with Kerry said Tuesday China's so-called nine-dash line that outlines Beijing's South China Sea claims is too ambiguous and causing tensions.

Many Asian countries accuse China of using its growing military power to aggressively advance its disputed sea claims and exploit the region's natural resources.

Two days of talks

The two days of talks, which are known as the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue, will also focus on how to deal with the threat of North Korea's nuclear weapons and the sensitive issue of cyber security. The U.S. called off talks on the issue earlier this year when Washington charged five Chinese military officers with cyber espionage — charges China angrily disputes.

Beijing hit back at the United States with accusations of its own, saying the recent revelations by ex-U.S. security contractor Edward Snowden proved the U.S. also engages in improper spying.

One issue on which the United States and China are cooperating is the fight against global warming.

U.S. and Chinese officials signed eight separate agreements Tuesday on sharing information and technology on climate change. They cover clean coal technology and power plants that can capture carbon dioxide before it is poured into the atmosphere.

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, who is leading the U.S. side of the talks along with Secretary Kerry, is also expected to raise long-standing concerns over the Chinese yuan, which U.S. officials say China is undervaluing in order to give its exporters an advantage.

Some information for this report comes from Reuters.

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Comments
     
by: Igor from: Russia
July 09, 2014 4:40 AM
I will not be shock if one day China claim part of The USA's territory as China's one.

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 09, 2014 9:30 AM
And China slavers over some part of Russia( Far-east region), USA, Russia and other nations, we all need to keep our eyes on it. And the whole world should work together to teach this Asian country a lesson-- it is not great.

In Response

by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 09, 2014 7:21 AM
Maybe China should take a nice piece of Russia, since Russia took a nice piece of Ukraine! This is fun, can I play too?


by: Frankie Fook-lun Leung from: Los Angeles
July 08, 2014 9:29 PM
One should study in great detail China's negotiation style. Read the British and Chinese negotiation over the transfer of sovereignty of Hong Kong, you will learn a few lessons.


by: Anonymous
July 08, 2014 9:51 AM
It is very ambitious in international politics , we are not sure which claim is true and which is not. The explosion of information can propagate negative influence if one's unable to see the true picture. A prominent investor said to know the culprit , you need to trace the trail of money , the real beneficial of the whole agenda!

In Response

by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 09, 2014 1:37 AM
So does that mean you can find out who the beneficiary is? I cannot find out because I am still hiding behind my screen name. And I am not cultured enough to do so.


by: meanbill from: USA
July 08, 2014 9:08 AM
WHEN Hagel met with a top Chinese general, and tried to discus the Chinese "EEZ" and "the Nine Dash Line" ... the Chines general walked away saying, "No compromise" and "No concessions" .... (Now tell me), what part of that Chinese response, didn't the US understand?...... (or tell me), what part of what the Chinese said, about never ever giving up "one inch" of the motherland again, wherever that sovereign inch of Chinese land, sea or air may be, didn't the US understand?

What part of China doesn't interfere in the internal politics of other countries, (like North Korea), doesn't the US understand? .... or what part of China saying, they don't want to hear about accusations on them spying... (from the US), "the greatest SPY country in the world"... doesn't the US understand? ...... (NO COMPROMISE, and NO CONCESSIONS) ????

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 09, 2014 11:27 AM

I think China is looking for not only oil and gas rights but a nautical "buffer" in the South China Sea and east China Sea. Their territorial claims have no basis in international law or history of the region. They have intruded on the national integrity of the Philippines, Viet Nam, Japan, Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan.
Most importantly, militarily, they are "bottled" up in the S China Sea with no clear avenue into the Pacific, a strategically debilitating scenario for a nation that gas global power ambitions.
All they have to do is agree to live in peace with their neighbors and to not make land grabs, and to withdraw back to the internationally recognized 200 mile limit.
But they won't as they see this as an opportunity to unsettle and
disrupt the region's democracies and to gain a foothold that might put them in a position to strengthen their bases on the periphery of the sea that hems them in with adversaries all around its outer fringes. At the end of the day, China is going to lose a lot of face.
The South China Sea

In Response

by: 1worldnow from: Earth
July 09, 2014 1:34 AM
"Let no man speweth forth that which he connot proveth" from Sun Tzu, 'The Art of Meanbill BS'........ US the greatest spy country? Well, at least you give some credit for the US having done something right! Right on! I bet that hurts, hehe!! I heard there are a lot of Chinese in China, is that true?

In Response

by: Anonymous
July 08, 2014 10:58 PM
Nobody care what's going on in China motherland, but China cares too much to get extra land from other neighbor countries such Japan, Taiwan, Vietnam, Philippines, and going down to Brunei... It's sign of over population. The earth run out space. The world can see Chinatown in every corner on the earth...People are nervous there are something multiply so fast...

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