News / Middle East

Kerry Says Turkish PM's Zionism Comments 'Objectionable'

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a news conference with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, not pictured, in Ankara, Friday, March 1, 2013.
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a news conference with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, not pictured, in Ankara, Friday, March 1, 2013.
VOA News
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Friday that the United States was dismayed by a comment from Turkey's prime minister likening Zionism to crimes against humanity.

"We not only disagree with it, but we found it objectionable," he said.

Kerry addressed a news conference in Ankara following a meeting with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu.

Kerry said the comments from Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan undermine the push for peace.

"I believe there is a way forward but it obviously gets more complicated in the aftermath such as that we heard in Vienna," he said.

Kerry said he will also raise his concerns during a meeting with Erdogan.

The Turkish prime minister said during a speech in Vienna this week that Zionism should be viewed as a crime against humanity. 

A spokesperson for U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon called the statement unfortunate, hurtful and divisive.

Once-close relations between Turkey and Israel have deteriorated since a deadly 2010 Israeli raid on a Turkish aid ship that was part of a flotilla trying to break Israel's blockade of Gaza. Nine Turks were killed in the raid. Israel says its forces acted in self-defense.

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by: Mark from: Dallas
March 02, 2013 9:40 PM
Not much context here. Kerry says Erdogan said something so we comment on Kerry's report. 120 words of "news" from the VOA. This is reminiscent of the late 70s UN resolution declaring Zionism to be a form of racism. These types of comments don't move anyone nearer to any common understanding, and Kerry isn't helping either.


by: Karen Holmes
March 01, 2013 2:46 PM
Each of the seven major world religions teaches one segment of a body of spiritual knowledge necessary to create the life you want. Christianity teaches coming up with a plan. Judaism teaches bringing in the people. Buddhism teaches the support aspect. Islam teaches stand on the principles.

Each also plays a favorite power game. In the case of the Middle East, when Christians wage war, (the Crusades) Muslims stand in protest--(the jihad), and it starts the proverbial pendulum swinging. Jews believe they are victimized by the conflict, and draw in the Christians for their security, which causes the pendulum to start to rotate, drawing everyone else into the crisis.

This fact is why there seems to be no solution to the Middle East crisis. It is difficult to see what games you are playing because to you they seem logical, but to others, they are oppressive.

The solution is the introduction of a fourth element, which in the case of the Middle East, is the principles of Buddhism. Each of the stakeholders must be able to get their financial support.


by: charlie from: USA
March 01, 2013 1:23 PM
The truth stings, unless people are living in a bubble of self deception. Calling out the North Koreans doesn't sting them because they live in a bubble unrelated to reality. The same goes for much of Europe and the US and other White-ruled states with powerful pro-Israeli interests like Australia. The truth can seem like an insult to the blind but it remains the truth and this truth will outlive the people and self-delusions that prop up a state built for foriegn Jews on the land of native Arabs.


by: Davis K. Thanjan from: New York
March 01, 2013 10:31 AM
Turkish Prime Minister Erdogan comments that Zionism as crime against humanity is despicable. His comment that islamaphobia is a crime against humanity is also despicable. How can any phobia, whether it is zionophobia or islamaphobia, become a crime against humanity?

Erdogan should be treated for his phobias. His crimes against humanity include the occupation of Cypress, the torture of the Kurds and Armenians, the non-recognition of the Armenian massacre, and attacks on press and freedom of expression. These are crimes against humanity rather than just phobias. The EU will never admit Turkey ruled by Erdogan with phobias as a member of the European Union. Erdogan mixes politics with Moslem religion in a country that is constituionally secular. The unconstituional and unconcionable views of Erdogan are regretable and deserves condemnation.

In Response

by: Maithe from: Paris, France
March 01, 2013 4:30 PM
I agree with you Davis : Erdogan should be treated for his 'phobias'! He is a dangerous megalomaniac leader. Peace ? He can't care less ! As you say the EU will not admit Turkey ruled by him as a member . Turkey is already a member of the OTAN - which is quite enough - . Erdogan should really calm down and stop being constantly insulting . Yes his attitude deserves a strong condemnation.

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