News / USA

US House Passes Border Security Bill

Speaker of the House John Boehner of Ohio, is surrounded by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Aug. 1, 2014, after a closed-door meeting of House Republicans to discuss the border crisis.
Speaker of the House John Boehner of Ohio, is surrounded by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Aug. 1, 2014, after a closed-door meeting of House Republicans to discuss the border crisis.
Cindy Saine

The Republican-led U.S. House of Representatives has approved a $694-million funding bill to secure the U.S southern border and address the humanitarian crisis from an influx of children from Central America.

The Senate, which already left for a five-week recess, is not expected to consider the bill.

Friday’s House vote comes one day after a failed effort to pass a supplemental funding bill in response to an influx of children from Central America. 

Republican lawmaker Michele Bachmann, speaking after House Republicans met Friday to make progress on the issue, said the border bills would now do what a core group of conservative Republicans wants. She said it would stop "the invasion of illegal foreign nationals into our country.”

Obama criticized House members for crafting border legislation he said they know will never be taken up in the Senate and that he has said he would veto.

Watch related video report by VOA's Celia Mendoza and Ramon Taylor

Border Patrol Members Discuss Dangers Facing Migrantsi
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Ramon Taylor, Celia Mendoza
August 08, 2014 7:38 PM
As young, undocumented immigrants from Central America continue to come across the U.S.-Mexican border - in many cases fleeing poverty, crime and gang violence in their home countries - the men and women of the U.S. Border Patrol are on the front lines of the effort to deal with the situation. VOA's Celia Mendoza and Ramon Taylor recently rode along with members of the Border Patrol in Texas' Rio Grande Valley to talk about the dangers migrants encounter when attempting to cross the border.


A statement late Friday from the White House press secretary said the legislation put forward by the House Republicans "does not responsibly address" the problem of unaccompanied children apprehended at the border. The statement said the proposed legislation could result in the deportation of hundreds of thousands of young people who were brought to the U.S. as children and are" Americans in every way but on paper."

Republican lawmakers blame the president for contributing to the influx of 57,000 children from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras this year, saying his rhetoric about immigration reform has caused confusion, which criminal trafficking gangs have exploited.

Republican Congressman Tom Cole said the right thing to do is to send a clear signal to deter children from making the dangerous journey to America. He said the U.S. needs to stop the flow of illegal immigrants in a humane and appropriate way.

House Democrats took to the floor in large numbers to oppose the border bills, calling them harsh and mean-spirited towards desperate children.  Democratic Congressman Luis Gutierrez said Hispanic voters would remember the way Republicans treated the Central American children for many elections to come:

Analysts say the president will likely have to shift funds to provide food and shelter for the children at the border, and that members of Congress will likely face the border issue again when they return in September.

The president had asked Congress for $3.7 billion to confront the crisis in early July. He wants to increase border security, as well as add more temporary housing and more immigration judges.

The influx of migrant children has created a huge burden on the immigration system, including where to house the migrants and whether there are enough judges to decide who gets asylum and who is deported.

 

 

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by: Gwen Vomit from: UK
August 02, 2014 6:08 PM
Despite the fact that doctors in Africa cannot keep Ebola from spreading, United States officials brought an affected patient into the country only days after President Obama signed an executive order mandating the detention of Americans who show signs of “respiratory illness.”

The first known Ebola patient on U.S. soil, Dr. Kent Brantly, was flown into Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, today after contracting the disease in Liberia during the latest outbreak in West Africa which has claimed the lives of over 700.

“Video from Emory showed someone wearing a white, full-body protective suit helping a similarly clad person emerge from the ambulance and walk into the hospital early Saturday afternoon,” CNN reported.

This has stoked concerns among the American public that Ebola could now spread inside the U.S., especially since the virus has been difficult to contain in Africa.




“It sounds like the perfect script for a horror movie: A virus with no vaccine and no cure kills hundreds of people; despite containment efforts, it keeps spreading, but it’s actually all too real in West Africa, where doctors have said Ebola is now ‘out of control,’” wrote Sheila M. Eldred for Discovery News.

Hospitals in America may not fare any better considering that antibiotic-resistant “nightmare bacteria” spread from one medical facility in 2001 to 46 states by 2013.

“Allegedly the Ebola carriers will be quarantined in special rooms, but we already know that American hospitals cannot even contain staph infections,” columnist Paul Craig Roberts wrote. “What happens to the utensils, plates, cups, and glasses with which the ebola infected persons eat and drink and who gets to clean the bed pans?”

“One slip-up by one person, one tear in a rubber glove, and the virus is loose.”

This really highlights the reckless nature of the global elite and government officials for importing a virus into the country which has no specific treatment and a mortality rate of up to 90%.

For one thing, state-funded universities across the U.S. are likewise maintaining weaponized viruses for so-called “bio-defense” under the Project Bioshield Act passed by Congress in 2004.

Because these facilities are only moderately secure for the most part, there is a real risk that a deadly virus could escape into the public and affect millions of Americans in an outbreak on the same level as the pandemics which killed 80% of Native American populations by the 19th century.

The National Research Council found that one infectious-disease laboratory in Kansas, for example, has a 70% chance that a virus will spread from its lab in the next 50 years, even though the facility is designated as “maximum security.”

And it should also be pointed out that this is just one lab out of many in the nation, a good percentage of which have even less security.

There is no doubt that an accidental or an orchestrated release of a virus from one of these labs could result in the deaths of millions as well as a draconian government response to the outbreak, including martial law, through both the Model State Emergency Health Powers Act drafted in 2001 and President Obama’s latest executive order which mandates the apprehension and detention of Americans who merely show signs of “respiratory illness.”

Simply put, instead of preventing Ebola and other viruses from spreading within the U.S., Obama is readying his administration for a power grab if a major pandemic breaks out throughout the country.


by: Ross from: Altadena
August 01, 2014 9:44 PM
If a 14 year old kid runs away, to say Sedona, AZ, what do they do with them? THEY PUT THEM ON A BUS AND SEND THEM HOME.


by: meanbill from: USA
August 01, 2014 8:25 PM
Hypothetically speaking?.... What if a million or more Mexicans and other South Americans just walked across the open US border, with millions more following, and just migrated to the southwestern states the US government took from Mexico by "Unequal Treaties" and force of arms?.... (Hypothetically speaking, what on earth would Obama do?).... ask for more taxpayer money, to feed and care for them?

In Response

by: William HorWill from: Georgia
August 02, 2014 9:49 AM
41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you who are cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me nothing to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me nothing to drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not invite me in, I needed clothes and you did not clothe me, I was sick and in prison and you did not look after me.’

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