News / Africa

US House Sub-Committee to Hold Hearing on Boko Haram Wednesday

FILE - U.S. Rep. Karen Bass
FILE - U.S. Rep. Karen Bass
Peter Clottey
The U.S. House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations will hold a hearing Wednesday to update members about the Boko Haram insurgency as well as conditions in parts of northern Nigeria, according to Congresswoman Karen Bass.

“My expectations are really to get an update primarily from former Ambassador Sanders who was recently in Nigeria. The other witnesses will be giving us their perspective and especially their perspective on Boko Haram,’ she said.

“There will be no representation from the State Department or from any other part of the administration,” said Bass. “And so we will not be getting up-to-date information from the administration’s point of view, and I think that is unfortunate, but that’s who is on the witness list so far.”                                

Her comments follow recent reports of violence perpetrated by the Islamist insurgent group. The United States and other Western countries have volunteered security assistance to help Nigeria combat the Islamist militants following the abduction of over 200 schoolgirls in Chibok over five weeks ago.

Bass says the United State has been involved in helping the West African country find solutions to the violence.

“The U.S. has been involved in helping Nigeria, but it’s a little bit of a sensitive subject in the sense that to the extent that Nigeria wants us to be involved, we are involved, but we can’t get involved any more than the country wants us to,” she said. 

Bass recently accompanied Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker and representatives of U.S. business organizations on a trade mission to the country’s commercial capital, Lagos.

Bass expressed concern about Nigeria’s security.

“That is a sad situation because on the one hand we should be celebrating Nigeria’s success and Nigeria’s advancement to be the largest strongest economy on the continent, and at the same time we are dealing with the tragedy from groups like Boko Haram, and we are also dealing with very poor conditions in the north,” she said. 

Some analysts say the country’s insecurity could undermine foreign investments that could help create jobs for the country’s youth.

Bass says while the latest violence is very troubling she does not believe at this point in time that there are any major threats to the overall economy.

But, she said anytime you have horrific acts, like those being committed by Boko Haram, the country must pay attention to the warning signs and very aggressively respond.
 
Clottey interview with U.S.Representative Karen Bass
Clottey interview with U.S.Representative Karen Bassi
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by: Sunny Enwerem from: Lagos Nigeria
June 11, 2014 8:15 AM
The big change I see on ground is more and more so called Lagos indigent are becoming street hooligans and tout due to the growing developments of the states ,the lack of political will to rain in on the so called Area Boys which are encouraged by the political party ruling the states,now more and more uneducated Northern youths I have met and offered jobs in the labor sector accept the job with delight while who choose to do a self labor job like trolley pushers those taut called area boys will demand fees and also commercial buses or private bus helper,for every plan to develop a site will meet demand from the taut before workers are allowed to work freely,Lagos is developing at thesame time heading for a society free fall.

by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
June 11, 2014 6:07 AM
In the Abuja 1989 declaration, one of the agenda is that Muslim men should love to Christian ladies or marry Christian ladies and have children by them, and those ladies and your kids will become Muslims. They will tell you we served the same God, etc, Just to get their intention accomplish. If we served the same God, why our Christian men cannot marry a Muslim lady? it is forbidding. they will killed the lady for marry a Christian man. If you have Muslim in your area, tell him you want to marry his daughter and see what he will say to you. It is time that the world eyes be open to this so call peaceful religion. Europe and Africa is gone already, they want the U.S.

by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
June 10, 2014 11:23 PM
The sole purpose of Islam is to seduce the world until it comes under Islamic laws. the purpose of the suicide bombing is to terrorized the people and put fear in them until they come under Islam. And in the Abuja declaration, one of the thing they came up with is to replaced Western laws with Sharia laws. And Sharia laws is legal in Canada. Sharia laws supersedes Canada federal laws. Islam is against the West because of our way of life. kidnapping 200 innocent school girls, is that peaceful? Brutal killing, is that peaceful? Look at what happened in London last week, husband killed his wife for going to school? is that peaceful? We have seen so many died in the hands of the so call religion call Islam. Then some people have the audacity to say Islam is peaceful? When the planes hit the wall trade center, Muslim from all over the world was rejoicing, Boko Haram is an instrument for Islam. Why has not been any Muslim leaders from the Arab Countries or around rebuke Boko Haram? Because Boko Haram is working for the same goal to Islamise the world. There is nothing peaceful about Islam. VOA has nothing to do with my point of view. VOA only published what I write.

by: Leroy Padmore from: Jersey City
June 10, 2014 7:43 PM
THE ABUJA DECLARATION 1989
IT IS TIME TO FACE THE TRUTH.
It is time to speak the truth about your so call peaceful religion Islam. You cannot say nothing about this religion, if you do, they will say you offended them. it is one of their strategic that they used to get the media attention. meanwhile, Islam is the one that really offending people. it is time that we all face the truth., They are the one who are doing in discriminating killing, committing sexual violence, they are the one who are suicide bombers, etc etc, in Abuja 1989 declaration, one of their goal is to Islamic the whole world from 2000 to 2020, the world should be Islamic. So in that declaration, they called for for a mass migration throughout Africa, Europe and the US. and with in that declaration, they told Muslims every country you go, infuriate their Government, take on one of the highest seat. and use their law against them. They have taken over Europe and Africa, they want the U.S. They are coming to the U.S, using our laws against, forbidding Christians to pray because it will offend them, They had that meeting to take over the world. so Boko Haram is just carrying on the mandate. It is time that the world wake up to reality.

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