News / Africa

US Imposes Sanctions on Military, Rebel Leader in S. Sudan

FILE - U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, Geneva, April 17, 2014.
FILE - U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, Geneva, April 17, 2014.
Mike Richman
The United States has announced its first sanctions against South Sudan, where clashes between pro- and anti-government forces have left thousands of people dead since mid-December.

Secretary of State John Kerry said the U.S. is imposing financial penalties on Marial Chanuong, a government military commander, and Peter Gadet, a military leader loyal to former vice president Riek Machar.

During a Tuesday appearance with EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton, Kerry said both men are responsible for "perpetrating unthinkable violence against civilians."

"We will do our utmost to prevent South Sudan from plunging back into the violence and despair that tore that country apart for so long," he said.

Ashton said the EU also is considering sanctions against Juba.

"I'm worried that this country is on the brink of what could be a civil war, ethnically motivated," she said. "The prospects for famine and a humanitarian disaster are really looming large now, so we need to work together. We need to work to ensure that the leaders in South Sudan really do take the action that you've identified they need to."

The sanctions will freeze any assets the two men have in the United States. The penalties also will bar U.S. citizens and companies from doing business with them.

Kerry visited South Sudan last week and met with President Salva Kiir, who agreed to attend peace talks his rival, Machar, in Ethiopia.

Earlier Tuesday, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Machar had also agreed to attend talks in Addis Ababa.

Speaking in South Sudan's capital, Juba, on Tuesday, Ban stopped short of saying Machar would meet with South Sudan's president, who told reporters that he is ready to meet with Machar in the Ethiopian capital.

Ban said Machar cautioned he might not make it to Addis Ababa by Friday, the projected date for the meeting, because of his remote location.

Machar has been in hiding for months as rebel and government forces clash across South Sudan. More than 1.2 million people have been displaced by the fighting and ethnic violence.

The unrest stems from a power dispute between Kiir and Machar, which worsened in December. The two sides signed a cease-fire agreement in January, but fighting has continued.

On Monday, both sides signed an agreement to facilitate the delivery of aid to populations in need, and to consider a "month of tranquility" so people can plant crops and care for livestock.

The U.N. has warned of a possible famine in South Sudan unless people can safely return to their fields. President Kiir said Tuesday that there would be a "serious disaster ... if we do not allow our people to cultivate now."

The U.N. refugee agency reports that 11,000 South Sudanese have crossed the border into Ethiopia since Saturday, fleeing clashes between government and rebel troops in the Upper Nile region.

The agency says 315,000 South Sudanese overall have fled to neighboring countries since violence erupted in December, while more than 920,000 others are displaced internally.

Tens of thousands are sheltering at U.N. bases across the country.

You May Like

Video On The Scene: In Gaza, Darkness Brings Dread and Death

Palestinians fear nighttime bombardment, VOA correspondent finds More

African Small Farmers Could Be Key to Ending Food Insecurity

Experts say providing access to microloans, crop insurance, better storage facilities, irrigation, road systems and market information could enable greater production More

University of Michigan Wins Solar Car Race

Squad guided its student-designed solar-powered vehicle to fifth consecutive time victory in eight-day bi-annual American Solar Challenge More

This forum has been closed.
Comment Sorting
Comments
     
by: Stephenpam from khartoum
May 08, 2014 1:57 AM
It is well known world wide that the american policy on resources of other countries because of oil in south sudan


by: Sam Dave from: USA
May 07, 2014 9:52 PM
Brother, Bol, you need to study South Sudan's crisis what's caused the war. Let me tell you this war is nonsense, senseless, unthinkable and fueled by greedy leaders like Kiir, Machar, Canuok, and Gadget plus Makuei who was involved himself into crisis. Look, Riek Machar is willing to have peace because he's sleeping under the trees and the rain is raining when he was forced out of Juba city and Kiir enjoyed his 4.5 billion bed and portfolios under the bed with full of billions of dollars that you even don't know and his family are living in Uganda and Kenya countries, drinking beer. But you get mad about US sanctions against president with his followers. Do the President care about his country people? You don't USA. USA try to safe you from president and former Vice president who fight over the office money. Let us pray together for peace and let mighty South Sudan get peace from selfish leaders. One day, one time God will hear us


by: Bol from: Bor
May 07, 2014 4:57 AM
The US is clearly anti-South Sudanese government. How on earth is a South Sudanese army general defending his people and his country be put on par with a rebel without cause?

When ever the rebel capture a town from the government of South Sudan, the US keeps quiet and when the government capture the town from the rebel the US gets outrage.

The US still doesn't know that South Sudanese in the don't give a damn about the US any more. South Sudan and South Sudanese people are now looking East.

To hell with the US.


by: Tobias
May 07, 2014 12:22 AM
"Unthinkable violence against civillians" so say the EU Foreign Policy Chief? Perhaps a study of Gukhurahundi, Murambatsvina, 2008 Elections and other events in Zimbabwe could enlighten peoples thinking as to humanitarian issues, which have "escaped" with the passage of time, but have all been recorded, for their benefit.

Featured Videos

Your JavaScript is turned off or you have an old version of Adobe's Flash Player. Get the latest Flash player.
Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spati
X
Reasey Poch
July 28, 2014 7:18 PM
China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video Vietnamese Staging Chinese Product Boycott After Oil Rig Spat

China recently pulled an oil rig from an area of the disputed South China Sea that Vietnam also claims. Despite the action, the incident has had a lingering effect on consumers in Vietnam. VOA's Reasey Poch reports from Hanoi on an effort to boycott Chinese products.
Video

Video ESA Spacecraft to Land on a Comet

After a long flight through deep space, a European Space Agency probe is finally approaching its target -- a comet millions of kilometers away from earth. Scientists say the mission may lead to some startling discoveries about the origins of the water on earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.
Video

Video Young Africans Arrive in US for Leadership Program

President Barack Obama's Young African Leadership Initiative has brought hundreds of young Africans to the United States for a six-week program aimed at building their knowledge and skills in fields such as public administration and business. Out of the 50,000 young Africans who applied for the program, just one percent was accepted. VOA's Laurel Bowman caught up with some of those who made the cut and has this report.
Video

Video In Honduras, Amnesty Rumors Fuel US Migration Surges

False rumors in Central America are fueling the current surge of undocumented young people being apprehended at the U.S. border. The inaccurate claims suggest the U.S. will give amnesty to young migrants from the region. As VOA's Brian Padden reports from Honduras, these rumors trace back to President Obama's 2012 executive order to halt deportations for some young undocumented immigrants already living in the United States.
Video

Video Students in Business for Themselves

They're only high school students, but they are making accessories for shoes, fabricating backpacks and doing product photography - all through their own businesses. It's the result of a partnership between a non-profit organization that teaches entrepreneurship and their schools. VOA's Mike O'Sullivan and Deyane Moses met the budding entrepreneurs near Los Angeles.
Video

Video Astronauts Train in Underwater Lab

In the world’s only underwater laboratory, four U.S. astronauts train for a planned visit to an asteroid. The lab - called Aquarius- is located five kilometers off Key Largo, in southern Florida. Living in close quarters and making excursions only into the surrounding ocean, they try to simulate the daily routine of a crew that will someday travel to collect samples of a rock orbiting far away from earth. VOA’s George Putic has more.

AppleAndroid