News / USA

    Washington React: US Imposes Visa Ban Amid Ukraine Crisis

    U.S. President Barack Obama answers a question about the situation in Ukraine in Washington, D.C. March 4, 2014.
    U.S. President Barack Obama answers a question about the situation in Ukraine in Washington, D.C. March 4, 2014.
    Luis Ramirez
    President Barack Obama says the United States considers an upcoming referendum on Ukraine's future illegal and on Thursday he ordered restrictions on U.S. visas and financial sanctions for Russians and Ukrainians who are impeding the democratic process in Ukraine.

    The new set of visa restrictions and financial sanctions are part of what Obama says is the cost that Russia will have to pay for interfering in Ukraine.

    Speaking to reporters Thursday at a previously unannounced White House briefing, the president condemned a referendum that has now been set for March 16 on whether Ukraine's Crimea region should become part of Russia.

    “The proposed referendum on the future of Crimea would violate the Ukrainian constitution and would violate international law.  Any discussion about the future of Ukraine must include the legitimate government of Ukraine.  In 2014, we are well beyond the days when borders can be redrawn over the heads of democratic leaders,” he said.

    Obama signed an executive order that authorizes sanctions on those responsible for violating what the president says are the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ukraine.   

    U.S. officials did not name the individuals who will have their visas to visit the United States cancelled or denied, but said they will include both Russians and Ukrainians who have been most directly involved in destabilizing the country.

    They declined to say whether Russian President Vladimir Putin will be among those targeted.

    On Capitol Hill, some U.S. lawmakers praised the move. Republican Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen said penalties should be stepped up.

    “Denying and revoking visas of Russian regime members who are connected to belligerent actions in Ukraine and freezing and prohibiting any of their U.S. property transactions are moves in the right direction, but now we must name and shame these persons,” she said.

    The United States has protested what it says is Russia's deployment of troops in the Crimean peninsula - an act Washington says is in direct violation of Ukraine's sovereignty.

    The Obama administration has been working to de-escalate the crisis.  Officials on Thursday said the penalties could be removed if Moscow returns its troops to Russian bases in Ukraine and recognizes Ukraine's new government.  At the same time, Washington warns it will step up sanctions if Russia should decide to move forces farther into eastern Ukraine.

    Secretary of State John Kerry has been in Rome meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, but there has been no agreement on ending the crisis.

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    Comment Sorting
    Comments
         
    by: Maciek from: Poland
    March 08, 2014 4:33 AM
    I'm with you, the USA, and if indeed it comes to military action that I will be one of those who, together with allies oppose aggression from Russia, I'm glad that the state immensely as great as the USA is not indifferent to this situation and you are ready together with the forces of uni European stand shoulder to shoulder and not leave ukraine same against such aggressive mad and unbridled President of Russia to be honest you are the only who can exert on it a fear and pressure to cease operations

    by: Vince257 from: France
    March 07, 2014 6:46 AM
    Russia and Ukraine suffer from their money going abroad, mainly to UE and USA. Those sanctions will remind Russians, Ukrainians(and many others: Indians, Chinese people, and so on) not to trust "Occident" for investing money.
    The whole money system is based on trust, and this trust should be backed by military forces/intelligence/propaganda. Obama and his administration, UE have made a terribly wrong move: they proved their army/intelligence/propaganda inefficient and that in addition they could not be trusted concerning money system! This is very, very bad for USA and UE.

    In addition Obama seems like he somehow forgot he is half black: this is isn't good neither in Russia or Ukraine.


    by: john Mac from: maribyrnong
    March 07, 2014 1:00 AM
    I don't know if Obama administration knows what they are doing ?. Their strategy base on .........."Hope."

    by: çhukwuemeka ukor from: lagos nigeria
    March 06, 2014 12:06 PM
    I just dont know what putin wants.

    by: Godwin from: Nigeria
    March 06, 2014 12:02 PM
    This guy is daft. Is he helping Russia or what is he trying to do? Some Russians may want to leave the country and defect to USA, like Edward Snowden defected to Russia - hmn...talk of one good turn: USA may be asking for its pound of flesh as a result of Snowden snubbing - but visa restrictions will bastardize all of that. USA can pretend to seize the assets of rogue - rather stray - Russians who refused to listen to Putin's warning not to do so, which may be a thank you diplomacy for Putin (Lavrov) helping out during the Syria red-line saga - remember?

    Yeah, it's a game, but I know as USA knows too, that Putin's Russia does not play the game of chess on the field of football. All the noise about sanctions should have their limit; after all it's been Russia holding the four aces in the negotiation of Iran's nuclear program, Syria's civil war, - all of which can impact the Middle East initiative (the Israelis and Palestinians) as well as SALT1 and SALT2 initiatives that have limited drastically the militarization of the Outer Space otherwise referred to by the late Ronald Regan as Stars Wars.

    The West should grow up and find ways of curbing garrulous tendencies capable of reactivating the old order called the Cold War, NATO or not. Remember it's the nuclear age, and Russia has abundance of nuclear materials and capability. Of course we all know that with the exception of Lavrov, Russia is not too used to diplomacy. So we should try as much as possible to avoid situations that can make Russia revert to its old self.

    by: Dmitriy from: Crimea
    March 06, 2014 10:05 AM
    Please help us here in Crimea. Russian invasion will kill us and they are going to migrate us to Far East of Russia. Putin wanna our genocide!!!!
    In Response

    by: Nessa from: UK
    March 12, 2014 9:52 AM
    First of all 56 % of Crimea population is Russian speakers and have close bond with Russia ( large number of the families of mariners from Russia live there ) . Those people also voted for ousted president of Ukraine and not happy to follow pro- western separatists. There is no proof to this point that Ukrainians in Crimea ( minority ) is suffering more than other people involved in a conflict around Ukraine, if so gives us some serious facts not bla bla bla …

    By the way, I am originally from Belarus, and to me your comments sounds one-sided ! I am not supported of Russia however manufacturing, tourism in Ukraine similarly to Belarus attract business from Russian not the West !!!
    In Response

    by: Serg from: Ukraine
    March 10, 2014 8:38 AM
    We will be killed by the government is much faster than the Russian military. Our president has betrayed us. Pensions are not allowed. Salaries are not allowed. Our family will not survive if it would. My father is very ill. I cant go to America because my family have no money even for food. This war will bring death to the Ukrainian people.
    In Response

    by: musawi melake
    March 06, 2014 3:03 PM
    Well, the US and the West have abetted and oversw many Genocides, and saved the perpetrators at venues like UNHRC by giving the authority to investigate and deliver justice to the same perpetrators(like asking the murder to find out wheather he really did it and if so decide the punishment). They surely will do so as long as they remain powerful and are able to dictate terns to less capable entities. The same may be true for Russia, i.e. as long as they have nukes, resources and permanent seat at the UN, they decide!

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